Nwbi Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:49am
post #1 of

Here is the link to the recipe for Prince William and Kate Middleton's wedding cake, which includes the instructions for making the tamarind fruit cake batter, icing, cake decorations and assembly. This recipe will feed 120-150 people. (The actual Royal Wedding Cake serves 850.)

http://abcnews.go.com/International/Royal_Wedding/royal-wedding-cake-recipe-pastry-chef-fiona-cairns/story?id=13459548

27 replies
Cohaja12 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:05am
post #2 of

Am I the only one that thinks this cake doesn't sound very appetizing?? Especially for a wedding?

rharris524 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:20am
post #3 of

No, it sounds pretty gross to me, too

heather208 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:25am
post #4 of

doesn't sound very tasty to me .........

kathyx1 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:47am
post #5 of

A rich fruit cake is traditional in the UK and, in days gone by Australia. A good fruit cake is delicious. I think I'll try this recipe out and let you know icon_smile.gif

Cohaja12 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:00am
post #6 of

Definitely let us know how it turns out! I guess as a wedding cake its just odd. I'm an odd ball that LOVES a good fruitcake.

Like kathyx said, it is a traditional cake. Guess they could say the same thing about red velvet!

poohsmomma Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:05am
post #7 of

I am probably one of the few people in the world who like fruit cake. It's a big Christmas tradition in our family, and I get the job of making it.

My only qualm is how it must taste covered in icing/fondant. Just can't imagine that.

klutzy_baker Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:08am
post #8 of

I must be the minority here because I think is sounds pretty good. I like fruit cake, though I'm not sure about an entire wedding cake (I'm from the US) haha. Thanks for the recipe icon_smile.gif

kathyx1, I'll be looking forward to your update on the recipe icon_smile.gif

BecuzImAGurl Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:24am
post #9 of

yes...whats bad about America is that they have their ways of making other countries or other places' things taste SO different and mislead many people on how the originals taste. I use to hate fruit cake because i had horrible ones but ever since I had one made by french chefs...I was in love, so I never say something is bad until I taste it...plus its funny how people just say something taste bad just by looking and reading about it. hahaha

klutzy_baker Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:37am
Quote:
Originally Posted by BecuzImAGurl

yes...whats bad about America is that they have their ways of making other countries or other places' things taste SO different and mislead many people on how the originals taste. I use to hate fruit cake because i had horrible ones but ever since I had one made by french chefs...I was in love, so I never say something is bad until I taste it...plus its funny how people just say something taste bad just by looking and reading about it. hahaha




You have totally hit the nail on the head! I'm a big advocate for trying different or what we would think are exotic foods....the don't knock it till you try it. Also, like you said about judging taste merely by reading the ingredients, you would be surprised what flavor combinations can go together.

It is a HUGE difference when you can get the authentic version though. I've had authentic Thai food and then Thai food at a restaurant and it's like night and day.

mcaulir Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:40am

A rich fruit cake is delicious! And they've been everyone's wedding cake covered in fondant here for years and years - the only way I'd ever eaten fondant until recently. Not at all strange.

Coral3 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 5:17am

I love a good traditional fruit cake. It goes really well with fondant icing - I would say it goes with fondant way better than any other cake does.

JanH Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 5:29am

My husband likes fruitcake, so I've tried quite a few recipes. And I must say that homemade is so much better than anything I've purchased.

This recipe sounds good and I'd try it as written at least once because I'm a candied ginger fan (peel not so much). icon_smile.gif

warchild Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 10:45am
Quote:
Originally Posted by BecuzImAGurl

yes...whats bad about America is that they have their ways of making other countries or other places' things taste SO different and mislead many people on how the originals taste. I use to hate fruit cake because i had horrible ones but ever since I had one made by french chefs...I was in love, so I never say something is bad until I taste it...plus its funny how people just say something taste bad just by looking and reading about it. hahaha




Right on. I'm always amazed when I see comments made about an unfamiliar food or recipe as being gross, awful, doesn't look tasty etc. The only way a recipe or food can be judged as being tasty or "gross" would be to try it.

People the world over have different traditions, they eat different foods than we do. Some of them make fruitcakes covered in marzipan, fondant, or royal icing for weddings instead of North American style cakes covered in buttercream, because its thier tradition. Why do some of us have such a need to mock that difference by saying its gross or awful?

Occther Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:09pm

Count me in as another fruit cake fan. But am not as fond of brandy. Of course, one could always make some substitutions.

teezed Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:47pm

I live in West Africa and over here, fruit cake is considered the only(or most appropriate) cake for weddings, Only people on a serious budget would go for other options ....
I happen to be a fruit cake fan too and I think the recipe looks promising, icon_biggrin.gif

teezed Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:48pm

I live in West Africa and over here, fruit cake is considered the only(or most appropriate) cake for weddings, Only people on a serious budget would go for other options ....
I happen to be a fruit cake fan too and I think the recipe looks promising, icon_biggrin.gif

artscallion Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:13pm

I love a good fruitcake. I'll definitely try this recipe.
Agree that the Americanized versions of other countries' foods can be misleading. The stuff you get in a Chinese restaurant is far from what folks actually eat in China. It's our version of it...deep fried and swimming in sugar syrup and fruit. Conversely, in China, they have adapted their McDonalds' American food to better suit their tastes...

http://www.weirdasianews.com/2010/03/23/blank-interesting-menu-items-mcdonalds-asia/

warchild Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:28pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Occther

Count me in as another fruit cake fan. But am not as fond of brandy. Of course, one could always make some substitutions.




Jamaican rum is a good sub if you're a fan of dark rum. I've been making a Jamaican Black Fruit Cake for my Christmas goodie gift packages since finding the recipe on the NYT website. I ended up buying the cookbook they got the recipe from too. The Black cake recipe has a fair amount of liquor in it, 3 1/2 cups total, so you'd have to be a fan of liquor in fruit cakes to appreciate the taste. I use a mixture of Jamaican rum, brandy, and Chambord (raspberry liqueur) and I leave the fruits soaking in the liquor mixture for two months before making the cakes.

Heres the link to the NYTs article on Jamaican Black Cake. You might like to give it a go if you're a fan of fruitcakes.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D06E4DE163DF93AA25751C1A9619C8B63&pagewanted=2

mcdonald Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:45pm

now that recipe sounds interesting... never tried a fruit cake but might have to explore!! Thanks for sharing

LNW Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 2:17pm

That's very neat she puts out all the instructions and everything to make the cake.

MaBakes Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 3:47pm

Fruit cake was always made for the groom's cake in Canada. (At least in eastern Canada) It has been only in recent years that it has taken a swing away to chocolates or fudge. Now I see some are requesting 3D cakes geared to the groom's hobby. Losing our British roots I guess! icon_cry.gif

Nwbi Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 4:11pm

The Jamaican Black Cake sounds delicious but it looks like too much work and expense for me, as does the Royal Wedding Cake recipe. I usually just buy fruit cake or hope someone passes one on to me at Christmas.

warchild Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 4:31pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaBakes

Fruit cake was always made for the groom's cake in Canada. (At least in eastern Canada) It has been only in recent years that it has taken a swing away to chocolates or fudge. Now I see some are requesting 3D cakes geared to the groom's hobby. Losing our British roots I guess! icon_cry.gif




Nah, we're not losing our British roots, we're just branchin out a bit! Check out a few British cake sites and you'll notice they're offering traditional fruit cakes as well as North American style wedding cakes, and cupcakes with swirls of frosting & sprinkles, as well as the traditional fairly cakes with glace icing and a petite flower.

New ways of doing things or baking things are taken on all the time. But.... when an important event comes along, its usually the old tried and true traditions that are the most requested. The Royal Wedding cake being a prime example of that! thumbs_up.gif

Chef_Stef Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 4:33pm

No one I know will even consider eating fruit cake, because of the shrink-wrapped chunk of fake colored fruit filled *whatever-it-is* that they sell in stores here.

I have always used a recipe from Rose Levy Berenbaum that I LOVE, and everyone who's tried (cleverly disguised as "Jamaican Rum Cake" heh heh) loves it too. It is rich, dark, moist, rummy, and has just the right amount of finely chopped nuts and REAL dried fruits (usually citron, apricot, cranberry, and whatever else I find, but none of those red or green cherry things).

I don't know that I'd do it as a wedding cake, because its crumb is pretty soft, but it sure goes over well at the holidays.

If she made it for the wedding; I bet it's wonderful.

warchild Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 5:21pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Stef

No one I know will even consider eating fruit cake, because of the shrink-wrapped chunk of fake colored fruit filled *whatever-it-is* that they sell in stores here.

I have always used a recipe from Rose Levy Berenbaum that I LOVE, and everyone who's tried (cleverly disguised as "Jamaican Rum Cake" heh heh) loves it too. It is rich, dark, moist, rummy, and has just the right amount of finely chopped nuts and REAL dried fruits (usually citron, apricot, cranberry, and whatever else I find, but none of those red or green cherry things).

I don't know that I'd do it as a wedding cake, because its crumb is pretty soft, but it sure goes over well at the holidays.

If she made it for the wedding; I bet it's wonderful.




Thats what I like about the Jamaican black cake, its all dried fruit and nuts as well. I vary the dried fruits to whatever suits my fancy at the time. Alton Brown has a lovely sounding fruit cake on his website thats dried fruits & nuts as well. I've had it printed out for ages, but have yet to try it as the Jamaican cake is so well liked by my family and friends.

auzzi Posted 1 May 2011 , 5:49am
Quote:
Quote:

My only qualm is how it must taste covered in icing/fondant. Just can't imagine that.




Royal Icing and Sugarpaste [rolled fondant, RTR , soft white or plastic icing] was invented for fruitcake - not sponge cake, pound cake, butter cakes, chocolate cakes or mud cakes, or any of the other cakes that are served at modern weddings - f r u i t c a k e!

JanetBme Posted 2 May 2011 , 2:08am

I think it is all what you are raised with and used to. There is no right or wrong, just what you are exposed to. I think that type of cakes evolved more according to climate and climate control than anything.

We tend to have big fridges and airconditioning everywhere - So in general we don't need to have a cake that will survive two or three weeks on the counter in any weather.

When we think of fruitcakes, its a heavy dense brick of a cake that is soaked in liquor for days, weeks...or more..(that grandma made). Most clients think we bake their cake the day they pick it up, they would be offended if they thought it was over a day or two old, and if they thought it was a week old, they wouldn't eat it!

It makes perfect sense that fondant was invented to seal in the fruitcake so it stays fresh while it ages....It wasn't until the last few years that many Americans have tasted fondant. It isn't a taste issue for most, it is a texture thing. We aren't used to chewing icing.

I lived an hour from Paris (in Belgium) for three years, and traveled throughout Europe. I never could get used to the sweets there. It's not right or wrong, just different.

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