I Won't Do That Again...

Decorating By Jennifer1970 Updated 3 May 2011 , 4:42am by Kristie925

Jennifer1970 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:18am
post #1 of 12

Not what I'd call a "disaster", but disappointing, yes. I made a cake to bring to my good friend/boss this week. While cracking the eggs, I got some shell in the batter. Couldn't fish it out, so thought I'd use my sieve and put the batter through it, leaving the shell. It worked fine, until I had a piece of cake. I could tell something was off just looking at it, the texture was almost like cornbread. My friend loved it, but I told her I owe her a do-over! Lesson learned, next time I use my hands to fish out the shell!

11 replies
bobwonderbuns Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:45am
post #2 of 12

I know what that's like! Now I crack each egg in a separate bowl and dump the egg into the mixer -- much easier to fish out shells in a tiny bowl!! icon_biggrin.gif

Kitagrl Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:46am
post #3 of 12

Oops!!!!

Next time if you break the eggs into a bowl first...and let it sit a minute...the shells will sink to the bottom and you can make sure they don't pour out with the eggs.

amanda37 Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:54am
post #4 of 12

or use a piece of egg shell, egg shell to egg shell are like magnets sucks right to it!

Unlimited Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 1:16am
post #5 of 12

If you crack eggs into a stainless steel bowl, any egg shells will stick to the bowl.

dldbrou Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 3:01am
post #6 of 12

Why do you crack your eggs in your batter. Believe me if you ever get a rotten egg, you will regret that you cracked it in the batter. I always crack in a separate dish one at a time and then put the eggs one at a time in the batter. I learned this lesson when I was in home economics and my partner did the eggs in the batter. It is not often that you find a rotten egg, but I wouldn't want to ruin my batter on a chance. Lesson learned.

leah_s Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 3:18am
post #7 of 12

Good sanitation rules mean that you don't crack eggs into the batter. You always crack eggs into a separate bowl.

bakingkat Posted 3 May 2011 , 3:43am
post #8 of 12

Just another reason as to why to crack eggs into a separate bowl. Just today I was cracking 98 eggs, and one, just one was bloody. I was super glad I was cracking into a little bowl because that way I only wasted 2 eggs (I was cracking and adding 4 at a time since there were soo many) instead of up to 90 eggs. Thank goodness your friend still enjoyed it. We learn something new everyday!

Kaybaby Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:03am
post #9 of 12

I always thought that the salmonella was on the outside of the shell.

Vonda

Coral3 Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:07am
post #10 of 12

I used to always crack my eggs directly into the mixer bowl while the mixer was going - but then I dropped the shell in on a couple occasions, and well, in about one second it's smashed up into a million pieces all through the batter. Needless to say I don't do that anymore. If I'm feeling lazy and making a small batch of batter I do still crack them directly into the mix (just not with the mixer going!). Less mucking around, saves time and mess (but yeah, you do have to be prepared to throw the whole lot if you get a bad egg!)

Coral3 Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:12am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaybaby

I always thought that the salmonella was on the outside of the shell.

Vonda




I *think* that's where it starts out, but bacteria can pass through the shell (which is porous), especially if the shell gets wet. Salmonella is most likely to be hanging around in the fat, ie the yolk. Whites on the other hand are very low risk.

Kristie925 Posted 3 May 2011 , 4:42am
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaybaby

I always thought that the salmonella was on the outside of the shell.

Vonda



I *think* that's where it starts out, but bacteria can pass through the shell (which is porous), especially if the shell gets wet. Salmonella is most likely to be hanging around in the fat, ie the yolk. Whites on the other hand are very low risk.



And, cooking to at least 160 degrees will kill the bacteria.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%