How To Make The Rainbow Cake?

Decorating By Maria925 Updated 29 Apr 2011 , 4:00pm by sweetmonkeycheese

Maria925 Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 1:42am
post #1 of 10

I'm making a rainbow cake for my friend's daughter. It is the cake that has 6 layers in each color. I've seen where you can make very thin layers. I was thinking of making 2 9" cakes (3 layers each).

Is it possible to stack the 2 cakes directly on top of each other like that without a cake board in between? And also how do you cut that??? Do you just slice really really thin pieces?

If anyone has done this and could offer advice I would greatly appreciate it!

TIA icon_biggrin.gif

9 replies
hrnewbie Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:00am
post #2 of 10

I'd be afraid to have 6 layers of cake stacked on top of each other without something happening. You could dowel it to keep them from moving around but I'd be worried about the weight. Of course, if your layers are really thin (1/2 - 3/4" each) then I might give it a try. But I wouldn't do it with 1" thick cakes. I'm just not that skilled yet. You could make two cakes with 3 colors each, stack them with a board, and then give everyone a slice of both.

Have you seen the rainbow cake that's searchable online by googling Omnomicon. Her recipe is too diet for my tastes but the appearance is neat. That might be another option to do the full spectrum of the rainbow without having to do a traditional layered approach.

Good luck and I can't wait to see what you create! icon_biggrin.gif

klutzy_baker Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:07am
post #3 of 10

I have a couple different sites that might help.

The first one by Whisk Kid is the six layer rainbow cake. But it is baked in individual pans. So it would take a little time.

http://whisk-kid.blogspot.com/2009/08/say-it-with-cake.html

The next site by Almostbourdain is a rainbow swirl cake. This one I don't see how you can torte. But you could bake it so it's nice a level and make it a double layer by baking two cakes?

http://almostbourdain.blogspot.com/2010/09/rainbow-swirl-cake.html

HTH

CookieD-oh Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 6:00am
post #4 of 10

I made the 6 thin layers once, (two tiers' worth) and it was a bit of a pain, but not too awful. It was really pretty when it was sliced. Pic for reference: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1595196/1595206
I think to make 6 full-sized layers you would need a board/dowels in the middle for structural support.

Maria925 Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 11:32am
post #5 of 10

Thank you all. I had seen the Whisk Kid's, but I just couldn't figure out how tall that cake was. I realize now that making 2 full cakes is probably going to be a bad idea...LOL!

It's just the layers in the Whisk Kid's (and others) seems so very thin. Maybe I will experiment and make them a little larger, but not as a big as a full size cake layer.

Sounds like this will be an experiment (before I made the REAL cake...LOL)!

novice Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 12:00pm
post #6 of 10

I have done it with two layers. You just put three colors in each layer, then use a colored filling between the two layers that matches one of the colors next to it. Make sure you put your colors in the pan in the correct order (for when you stack it) so you will get the rainbow effect.

Event though you put the colors one on top of another in the pan, baking makes the bottom color creep up the sides, so the final product is not as perfect as doing each color individually, but it is a lot easier and still gives you the wow when cutting it.

sweetmonkeycheese Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:37pm
post #7 of 10

I thought I saw once someone take a large sqaure an that is shallow ( sorry I have no idea what anything is called) has a small "lip " to the side and they took the colored batter (it was thinkish) and the put down each color next to each other on the pan - ok more a a retacgle pan not a perfect square) and then baked it. when it came out they cut out each color and then then iced and stacked. This way they did not have 6 or so little pan baking but only the one large flat-ish one.

I have a feeling I am making no sense, I can see it in my head... but hard to explain since I dont know the terms.

klutzy_baker Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:43pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maria925

Thank you all. I had seen the Whisk Kid's, but I just couldn't figure out how tall that cake was. I realize now that making 2 full cakes is probably going to be a bad idea...LOL!

It's just the layers in the Whisk Kid's (and others) seems so very thin. Maybe I will experiment and make them a little larger, but not as a big as a full size cake layer.

Sounds like this will be an experiment (before I made the REAL cake...LOL)!




Whisk Kid's cakes are very thin. I watched her Martha Stewart video to get a scale of the layers, and I would say they are around 3/8'' - 1/2''. I'm not too good with estimating volume, but I would hazard a guess that they amount of batter she's putting in each pan is about 1.5 cups? You might be able to get a better idea than I if you watch the video.

Good luck experimenting!! icon_biggrin.gif

sweetmonkeycheese Posted 29 Apr 2011 , 3:47pm
post #9 of 10

I think the pan I am talking about is called a jelly roll pan. I have yet to find what i was.. maybe it was a video and I cant see videos at work.. but what about this idea

http://www.bakerella.com/fourteen-for-the-fourteenth/

but w/ just the number you need and w/ color?

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