Dehumidifiers And Drying Fondant/gumpaste

Decorating By CiNoRi Updated 25 Aug 2014 , 3:05am by cakesforu

CiNoRi Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 6:51pm
post #1 of 11

Hey all!

I was wondering if anyone had tried using a dehumidifier to help dry your fondant/gumpaste decorations?

10 replies
CiNoRi Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 12:57pm
post #2 of 11

Any thoughts? I thought about getting one and possibly making a drying "box" with it

ibmoser Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 4:52pm
post #3 of 11

I have and constantly use an old dehydrator - but only for gum paste. Fondant melts - horrible mess. Mine is an old, round stacking unit with only about 1 1/2 inches between the trays, so DH made a couple of collars (from plastic laminate) to use as tall spacers so that I can dry bigger/taller items. Couldn't live in a coastal swamp and dry gum paste any other way LOL.

CiNoRi Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 4:59pm
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibmoser

I have and constantly use an old dehydrator - but only for gum paste. Fondant melts - horrible mess. Mine is an old, round stacking unit with only about 1 1/2 inches between the trays, so DH made a couple of collars (from plastic laminate) to use as tall spacers so that I can dry bigger/taller items. Couldn't live in a coastal swamp and dry gum paste any other way LOL.




I have a dehydrator... and you are right about the heat, that's why I was thinking of a dehumidifier... since as far as I know heat wouldn't be an issue.

I don't have access to one to try... and if hate to go buy one if it's not worth it icon_wink.gif

ibmoser Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 6:04pm
post #5 of 11

I'm sure the dehumidifier would help. I store thoroughly dried gum paste in air-tight boxes with a little container of Damp-rid - amazes me to see the moisture that collects even with the silicone seal on the boxes. Wish I had a dehumidifier to try in a confined area. Let us know how it works if you decide to try it.

cheatize Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 7:34pm
post #6 of 11

I haven't tried it with fondant yet, but I just used one last night for buttercream. I had to thin it a lot because the cake was crumbling (carved cake) and after 4 hours it wasn't crusted. It was also stormy here last night (and the last few weeks, actually). Within an hour, it had crusted. Too much, of course, but it did crust. I'm hoping this is the answer to my summer fondant problem as I don't have central air and window air conditioners weren't enough last year.

Texas_Rose Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 7:44pm
post #7 of 11

The dehumidifier puts out a lot of heat. I used one before when I didn't have a decent air conditioner in my apartment. It cost almost $300 and we used it for the whole summer. Every day it took about 6 gallons of water out of the air which made it much more comfortable...but it constantly blows out hot air.

It did make it possible, barely, to do cakes with no air conditioning. Marshmallow fondant decorations (like bow loops) dried in a day when I was using it.

The heat that it generates and the expense of the machine itself are the real reasons for not using it. When I can't get a cake to crust now, I stick it in the fridge for a few minutes and that always does the trick.

pburgess68 Posted 28 Apr 2011 , 7:48pm
post #8 of 11

Last week I had forgotten to make petals for some flowers I was putting on a cake, due the next day. I made them out of fondant instead of gumpaste (that's what I had handy and already in green!), and I knew they would take forever to dry out.

I had remembered reading a trick about turning the oven light on and putting your deco's in there, so that's exactly what I did. Once or twice I turned the oven on 350 for like 10 seconds, just enough to get SOME heat, then I shut it off (it was extremely hot and humid last weekend!). This worked absolutely perfectly and I was actually able to make some last minute gumpaste daisies and dry them the same way. ALL of them were perfectly dry and ready to use.

cheatize Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:07am
post #9 of 11

The problem is: when it comes out of the fridge, it melts again, and quickly. I haven't found a complete answer yet- other than to get central air. I tried putting gumpaste under a desk lamp in a window air conditioned room, putting it in just a window air-conditioned room without the desk lamp, and then tried the oven light. I could get it to harden last summer, but the moment I removed it from it's safe environment it started to soften again and within minutes was a floppy as when I made it.

Someone please convince my hubby that we need central air or I cannot cake for several months of the year!

Evoir Posted 30 Apr 2011 , 12:46am
post #10 of 11

I use a food dehydrator for gumpaste items when the weather is humid and I need things in a hurry! But for cakes I have a reverse cycle A/C in the room I work and this controls heat/cold/humidity perfectly. You can buy a unit for one room much cheaper than installing a ducted system through your whole house icon_smile.gif

cakesforu Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 3:05am
post #11 of 11
 

Hi, I have a major project due next week which requires lots of flowers and little leaves. so i decided to start 2wks in advance to lets things role smoothly.  Than the rain begins and the humidity and all my flowers go droopy and limp and the stress begins. After trying to save them putting the fan on and AC not wanting to work properly i start with a fresh batch with 50 gumpaste and 50 fondant and an overdose of Tylose powder. This works perfectly but it rained again and they softened  and i was'nt going to start over again, so i went yesterday morning and bought the Sunbeam dehydrator and started straight away placing them in and keeping an eye on it every hour. YES they finally dried out and i put new batch in this morning and kept an eye on the ones i did yesterday and they are still firm as. I have the little leaves which have dried finally on there own but worried if it starts to rain again are they going to soften so when i get home this afternoon i will put them in for a few hours.

 

All fingers crossed this will work and even if it rains they will hopefully stay very firm.

 

so i guess spending $105 was worth it and wish they made the trays much higher.

 

Wish you all the best.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%