Stacking Cakes

Decorating By totita Updated 27 Apr 2011 , 7:35pm by Marianna46

totita Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 5:48pm
post #1 of 7

Hello everybody! I'm new to this site and I love it! Anyway, i have a few questions about cake stacking. Im making a two tiered minnie mouse cake for a birthday party. It's supposed to feed 100 people!!!! I thought of making a 16" botom tier and 12 " top tier and a few cake pops for the kiddos. It will be buttercream and needs to be transported. Is that enough cake for the party? How many dowels should I use for support? And do i need a center dowel to go through entire cake? If so should i prehole to make it easier?
If anyone can help....please please please!!!!

6 replies
Marianna46 Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 6:02pm
post #2 of 7

If you want to know how many people your cake will serve, go to this excellent cake calculator posted by metria here on CC:
http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator.cgi
The cake you're thinking about will be much too large. A 14" and a 10" would be closer to the mark, although that will give you a little more than you need too. You can forget about the cake pops, unless you really want to make them. There will be enough cake. If it's only two tiers, I wouldn't use a center dowel, but since it's buttercream, I'd think seriously about transporting it unstacked and assembling it there. Five or six supports will be enough , but I have another suggestion there, too: don't use dowels, but straws cut to the proper length (if you can get bubble tea straws, which are wider, that would be good, but I just use regular drinking straws). Straws are sturdy and don't displace as much cake, making the cake less likely to crumple. Good luck with this!

ajwonka Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 6:14pm
post #3 of 7

Curious, why would you recommend not transporting a stacked buttercream cake? I've only transported stacked fondant tiers - how does buttercream change the process?

CWR41 Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 6:19pm
post #4 of 7

Stacked construction:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/tiered-cakes/stacked-tiered-cake-construction.cfm
Servings:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm
156 servings from 16" and 12"... too much for the 100 goal.
A center dowel will help to prevent the tiers from sliding apart from one another during transport... just hammer through all tiers and the one cake circle in between--it's easy.

Marianna46 Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 7:34pm
post #5 of 7

Ajwonka, I'm just a chicken about buttercream! It takes me forever to do right (and then it doesn't look any too good!), so I try to stack as close to the end of the process as possible so that I can repair anything that happens on the road. I was so happy when people started using fondant on their cakes - my buttercream cakes always looked totally amateurish. Now that I'm turning pro, I'm better at it, but still not great. Sorry about the triple post here. I'd delete the others if I knew how to!

Marianna46 Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 7:34pm
post #6 of 7

Ajwonka, I'm just a chicken about buttercream! It takes me forever to do right (and then it doesn't look any too good!), so I try to stack as close to the end of the process as possible so that I can repair anything that happens on the road. I was so happy when people started using fondant on their cakes - my buttercream cakes always looked totally amateurish. Now that I'm turning pro, I'm better at it, but still not great.

Marianna46 Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 7:35pm
post #7 of 7

Ajwonka, I'm just a chicken about buttercream! It takes me forever to do right (and then it doesn't look any too good!), so I try to stack as close to the end of the process as possible so that I can repair anything that happens on the road. I was so happy when people started using fondant on their cakes - my buttercream cakes always looked totally amateurish. Now that I'm turning pro, I'm better at it, but still not great.

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