Transporting A Cake On A 2 1/2 Hour Trip?

Decorating By CakeCrystal5308 Updated 27 Apr 2011 , 12:42am by tokazodo

CakeCrystal5308 Posted 26 Apr 2011 , 11:12pm
post #1 of 4

Any advice on transporting a cake on a roughly 2 1/2 hour trip?
it will be two tiers, the first tier being covered in "grass" and the 2nd tier looking like a tree stump, I was thinking I could transport them seperately, take my frosting and such with me, and assemble on site? Since, I will also have 5 stand up 3D edible characters that go on the cake as well, (I am making the Fraggle Rock puppets out of rice crispie, chocolate, and MMF)

Since this cake is for family, they won't mind me assembling it on site. I am just trying to think of any troubles we may run into (besides needing to keep the car super cold), and assembling away from my home where all my stuff is...

Ideas Please?
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Attached is my rough draft sketch #1 of this cake

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f60/leila86/RobynDraft1.jpg

3 replies
AmysCakesNCandies Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 12:12am
post #2 of 4

Pack each tier in its own cake box & the figures resting on food grade tissue or crumpled up parchment for cushion in thier own box. Put the completed tiers on a board & box about 1 inch larger, "glue" the cake board to the extra cake board with royal icing. Pack the boxes so they will not shift- i like to use sqaures of plywood tp fill in open space around them in the back of my car so there is no room for the box to shift. and bring a repair kit, with anything you might need to fix a bumo or bruise. good luck!

AmysCakesNCandies Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 12:22am
post #3 of 4

Pack each tier in its own cake box & the figures resting on food grade tissue or crumpled up parchment for cushion in thier own box. Put the completed tiers on a board & box about 1 inch larger, "glue" the cake board to the extra cake board with royal icing. Pack the boxes so they will not shift- i like to use sqaures of plywood tp fill in open space around them in the back of my car so there is no room for the box to shift. and bring a repair kit, with anything you might need to fix a bumo or bruise. good luck!

tokazodo Posted 27 Apr 2011 , 12:42am
post #4 of 4

I like using Edna De La Cruz's (Designmeacake.com)stacking method. I did it with a two tier wedding cake which traveled 2 hours, stacked. (Edna Rocks! I am so thankful she puts her videos out there where we can watch them for free!)
I am not brave enough to drivI did it with a two tier wedding cake which traveled 2 hours, stacked. I am not comfortable, driving, with three tiers stacked yet.
I let the 3rd tier ride shot gun.
I drove with the cake in the front seat of my car. I level the box with a bottle of drinking water in the crease of the seat. I also seat belt the box in place.
Personally, if it was me, I'd stack the two layers and place the figures when I got on site. You never know what kind of 'kitchen', you will find and what kind of little fingers will want to 'help'.
For me, it's easier to have all the work done and then sit and visit with company or family.
But that's just me. That's my opinion, and we all know what they say about opinions.
This is the cake that traveled 2 hours and it made it just fine.
http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1961311

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