Open For Business

Business By kimbordeaux Updated 25 Apr 2011 , 6:44pm by CalhounsCakery

kimbordeaux Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 1:00am
post #1 of 10

My shop is open! Well, it has been for about 2 months now just haven't had the time to sit down and post about it. Its alot of work, one woman show right now until I start making enough money to actually pay someone. Making enough to pay rent, lights, water, phone, buy supplies and little extra. I'm in the position where I need to accept more orders so that I can afford to hire help but cannot take more orders because its only me and there's no way possible it could get done. Oh, and my children ride schoolbus to shop and they hang in front part of shop until my husband gets off work. It will all come together. I will not fail! I dream big icon_smile.gif

(Tried to post my logos but it didn't work... I can never get files to post in the forum)

9 replies
sari66 Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 1:02am
post #2 of 10

Congratulations!!

Motta Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 1:56am
post #3 of 10

Congratulations Kim! I remember you posting about your shop and how hard you've had to work for it. I'm so glad to hear that it's working out well!! I wish you continued success.

As for hiring, you can sometimes find help for free from high schools who have cooking programs. These students need practice in a real bakery and you don't have to pay them if it's part of a school curriculum. Of course, you'll have to check your local details but that's how it is around here and I'm in Alberta, Canada.

Or, gov't programs to help people back to work - they will subsidize the salary so you only pay a portion, not all of it.

Or, a part-time person to mix icings and batters only. Just some ideas for you..

What are your current hours?

scp1127 Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 6:23am
post #4 of 10

Kim, you need to take a hard look at an employee. All businesses are stagnated by the amount of work the owner can do. If you want to pm me, I will tell you a way to do this. My method has been scrutinized by the IRS and the Feds (I was a witness in a tax fraud case) and it is thumbs up. If I post it, it will be up for debate. And unless we have a caker who is also a tax fraud prosecutor fo the IRS, I have no intention to debate. I have a degree in accounting and economics, and have owned three businesses using this method.

JanH Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 6:31am
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbordeaux

(Tried to post my logos but it didn't work... I can never get files to post in the forum)




The attachment to post feature software has been malfunctioning for awhile now.

HTH

kimbordeaux Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 11:52am
post #6 of 10

Thanks ya'll!

Motta, the Culinary Arts teacher from the local high school has already contacted me about hiring some of her students after school so that they can gain experience and earn credits. I was all for it until I realized I had to pay them, lol. I was hoping since they were working off school credits it would be free work but the teacher wouldn't go for that icon_sad.gif

HappyCake10609 Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 12:58pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbordeaux

Thanks ya'll!

Motta, the Culinary Arts teacher from the local high school has already contacted me about hiring some of her students after school so that they can gain experience and earn credits. I was all for it until I realized I had to pay them, lol. I was hoping since they were working off school credits it would be free work but the teacher wouldn't go for that icon_sad.gif




Congratulations on your shop!

That stinks about the high school students, they would be eager helpers! What if you try to work it out as an internship? I think it is fairly common in business for high school/college students to "intern" for credit only and not for pay. My husband is a chemist (I know it's a completely different industry), but they get interns all the time, from college, and they are happy to just have actual work experience they can put on their resume... I would think it would be similar with baking!

CupQuequito Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 2:57pm
post #8 of 10

Congratulations!

You can always "advertise" for an intern icon_wink.gif

cakesbycathy Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 3:24pm
post #9 of 10

I'm thinking you might be more successful in looking at either a college or trade school for unpaid interns. They may be more reliable/responsible than high school students. ALso, if they aren't going to get credit or get paid I don't think the interest will be as serious from high school students.

CalhounsCakery Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 6:44pm
post #10 of 10

I don't know about in the states, but I know in Canada we have co-op placements. It's basically an afternoon or morning when the highschool student goes to "work". They learn something about what they want to do after highschool, and get evaluated by the employer, and graded based on that. I know many students who did that when I was in highschool, and I myself did it in a kindergarted classroom. Maybe you can see if any local highschools have a program like that? It may not be the most consistant work, but it might help.

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