Thinks I'm Gonna Cry :(

Decorating By yamber82 Updated 24 Apr 2011 , 9:10am by allaboutcakeuk

yamber82 Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 8:23pm
post #1 of 18

wedding is in just a few hours and my cake is sweating super bad.

i posted a few times already about it. my first attempt at stenciling. i stenciled the black on the white and it started bleeding so this morning i scraped it off and started over. NOW my cake is sweating really bad and i have no idea why!!! i should have just left it alone icon_sad.gif i still have the top tier to stencil. i put it back in the fridge to sit for a while and hope that helps. any ideas what is going on???

17 replies
yamber82 Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 8:29pm
post #2 of 18

i'm afraid that once i get it there and leave it will start melting or something. it's been in the fridge.

leah_s Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 8:52pm
post #3 of 18

The problem is putting it in and taking it out of the fridge over and over again. Of course condensation will develop.

allaboutcakeuk Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 8:53pm
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by yamber82

i'm afraid that once i get it there and leave it will start melting or something. it's been in the fridge.




Did you put it in the fridge to start with or after you had done the stencilling?

Kitagrl Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 9:04pm
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

The problem is putting it in and taking it out of the fridge over and over again. Of course condensation will develop.




I do this all the time, though....and its never a big enough problem to worry about! I put my cake in the fridge and take it out all the time.

yamber82 Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 9:08pm
post #6 of 18

well i finished stenciling again. it doesn't look terrible but it's not as good as the first time. i'm really bummed. it was sooo good the first time i did it. my bc was perfect and everything.

yamber82 Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 9:09pm
post #7 of 18

ok i'm going to deliver in about an hour, should i take it out and leave it out? i have to stack the top tier again and put the ribbon back on. or should i leave it in the fridge until we leave?

leah_s Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 9:14pm
post #8 of 18

Well, Kita, wouldn't it depend on the temp difference between the ambient air and the fridge. I will never understand why people want to put cakes in the fridge.

Putting a bc cake in the freezer to firm up prior to stenciling, I get that.

Kitagrl Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 9:19pm
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Well, Kita, wouldn't it depend on the temp difference between the ambient air and the fridge. I will never understand why people want to put cakes in the fridge.

Putting a bc cake in the freezer to firm up prior to stenciling, I get that.




They travel much better (for those of us who still don't use SPS hahaha) and its so much easier to apply the fondant and easier to stack and easier to do almost everything....

I realize there are decorators that are so much more talented than me who can do a room temp cake with no problem, and deliver a room temp cake with no problem...unfortunately I am not one of them. icon_smile.gif But my cakes are always moist and flavorful (I recommend they be served at room temp) and so since its not "broke" I don't need to fix it.

I just feel people should not be afraid to refrigerate their cakes.

Of course if the OP is in a hot, humid climate I do apologize, as that can be a problem.

sweetmonkeycheese Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 10:30pm
post #10 of 18

I love cold cake best so I like mine from the frig! but I am just a hobby baker.

Good luck on the cake delivery!

kel58 Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 11:24pm
post #11 of 18

I had had sweating problems befors when using black icing or fondant and removing it from the fridge. The condensation made a bit of mess but luckily it was a freebie cake for my friends b-day. I will still refriderate a cake but i think twice if im using dark coloured accents with tend to run worse (more concentrated colour maybe?)

I hope your delivery went well!

yamber82 Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 12:53am
post #12 of 18

i am not a professional, more of a hobby baker semi in the business. anyways, i live in a very humid climate, texas. i thought i was SUPOSED to refrigerate my cakes unless they were fondant. i hoenstly did not know that. thanks so much for the info! it did bleed on the ride over icon_sad.gif i didn't get a chance to talk to the bride so hopefully she wasn't too upset about it. all the onlookers thought it looked great still but imo it wasn't up to par. i wll add a pic in a few.

yamber82 Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 1:04am
post #13 of 18

the pic is up. honest opinions please. constructive criticism welcome.

tokazodo Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 1:28am
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by yamber82

i am not a professional, more of a hobby baker semi in the business. anyways, i live in a very humid climate, texas. i thought i was SUPOSED to refrigerate my cakes unless they were fondant. i hoenstly did not know that. thanks so much for the info! it did bleed on the ride over icon_sad.gif i didn't get a chance to talk to the bride so hopefully she wasn't too upset about it. all the onlookers thought it looked great still but imo it wasn't up to par. i wll add a pic in a few.




Yamber, I'm glad you told us where you live. I live on the Outer Banks of North Carolina here summer time temps can reach over 90 degrees in June and the humidity is almost 60% - 80% on a daily basis. I have had to tweak all kinds of recipes to deal with the heat and humidity here. If I take anything out of the fridge, it instantly sweats, no matter what it is.

Hope this helps.

P.S. I liked your cake, it was pretty!

Kitagrl Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 1:30am
post #15 of 18

I'm sorry, I missed the Texas part...

yamber82 Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 2:28am
post #16 of 18

i havn't done cakes in over a year until jsut now. i didn't charge her much either because this was kind of my trial run to see if i could hand'e it with two kids. i charged her 300 for both the bride's and groom's cake. (tackle box). i think i way under charged her and was kicking myself for it. i baked about half the cake and realized it tasted like poo so i threw it all away and started over with a new recipe.

i did a 3d duck cake too which turned out great except it started sweating too and the fondant was bubbling and melting. it was aweful. i'll add a pic of that one too. i think it was because i put the fondant on the cake when it was still semi frozen. either that or because i had it sitting on the table with a big plastic storage container over it to keep my toddler from seeing/touching it. it may have made it somewhat air tight under neath. i'm not sure.

i seem to have forgotten the basics tips on those things. i don't ever remember having these problems when i did cakes before.

is there a place i can go to or a good thread of basic tips like this on when to refrigerate and when not too etc?

BlakesCakes Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 4:01am
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by yamber82


i put the fondant on the cake when it was still semi frozen. either that or because i had it sitting on the table with a big plastic storage container over it to keep my toddler from seeing/touching it. it may have made it somewhat air tight under neath. i'm not sure.




Not a good idea to fondant a frozen cake. The condensation that will form on the back of the fondant will melt the fondant from the back.

Also not a good idea to ever cover a fondant cake with a plastic storage container. Being pretty airtight, again, you have the problem of the moisture in the cake beginning to melt the fondant from the back, hence all the air bubbles.

As for refrigeration, if it has perishable icing or fillings, then it needs to be refrigerated and the design & storage have to take that into account. It may mean that a stenciled cake has to be stenciled immediately before delivery.

I work only in non-perishables. I bake, freeze, defrost most of the way, fill, crumb coat, refrigerate for maybe 15 mins. to stiffen only, finish coat, refrigerate for again maybe 15 mins. to stiffen, cover in fondant, and then leave at room temp for decorating. Depending on the travel time, temp. on day of delivery, etc., I may refrigerate the completed cake for up to an hour before putting it in the car.

HTH
Rae

allaboutcakeuk Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 9:10am
post #18 of 18

I have never put my cakes in the fridge. Ok I leave in the dear old UK but this week its super hot and all my cakes are delivered from kitchen to person with no fridge. I once did the fridge to firm up a pumpkin cake prior to fondant - big mishap and the whole thing had condensation and was soggy and sticky. I'm not sure how it works with the fridge thing for people in hot countries but I can't get it to work that way for me icon_smile.gif

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