This Seems Too Easy....

Business By Motta Updated 25 Apr 2011 , 12:50am by Motta

Motta Posted 22 Apr 2011 , 4:58am
post #1 of 9

I emailed a hotel (very large, successful chain hotel) and suggested they add a custom cake to one of their grad packages - it was worth a shot! icon_smile.gif The catering manager declined that but told me to bring some business cards and brochures and she would put me on her preferred vendor list for weddings! I called her immediately and we chatted about business.

I'm meeting with her next week. She said she's running out of business cards for wedding bakers and her brides need someone to call. I don't know if she even looked at my website! This seems way too easy. Any stories or advice on dealing with hotels?

8 replies
indydebi Posted 22 Apr 2011 , 8:36am
post #2 of 9

Get to know their in-house wedding coordinator. Find out ahead of time if they need a copy of your HD license in their file; if they need a certificate of liability (your agent can provide this); what door you should use for delivery; delivery times (i.e. "I like to deliver my cakes one hour (or your preferred time frame) prior to the event ... does that work well with you?").

If you have equipment that needs returned, will the hotel hold it for you to pick up the next Monday or will you have to make the bride responsible for it? Every hotel I worked with was happy to hold my equipment for me .... I provided a box or sometimes a white trash bag with my name and phone number written in black magic marker on it for them to put the stuff in. I even told them not to worry about washing anything. They loved this arrangement. (the only thing they liked better was "nothing needs returned .... just trash everything." boy, they will REALLY love you if you can do this on all of your cakes!) thumbs_up.gif

Motta Posted 22 Apr 2011 , 2:13pm
post #3 of 9

Hi Debi - good idea about taking the license, insurance, etc. I want them to know they are working with a professional.

I like the white trash bag idea! Right now everything can be thrown out except the cake stands. That's one reason I hesitate to buy Cake Stackers - too many small parts to lose!

Anyways, great advice as usual - thank you!!!

homebasedbaking Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 1:50am
post #4 of 9

As someone who appreciated the W Hotel handling a special birthday cake for my daughter (made by a HBB while visit the ATL) I can tell you this was a true blessing for me. Last year the W Hotel in Atlanta (which does not offer celebration cakes), asked their resident baker on call to design a special birthday cake for me. The cake was amazing and she even provided a little business card with her contact info and website. Excellent advice from the seasoned bakers above, and if this is organized properly could be a great opportunity. I am in a major city and this baker, who I did call and use again, said she averages 10-12 cakes a month just from the hotel. Good luck to you. Oh yeah, this baker has a monthly newsletter that showcases her signature cake flavors...just thought that was a nice touch.

indydebi Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 2:01am
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motta

Hi Debi - good idea about taking the license, insurance, etc.


Please be aware that taking a copy of your insurance policy is not the same as a Certificate of Insurance. A C of I is issued by your agent and actually lists the hotel as an add'l insured (and ask them how they need this made out and get the email/fax number they need this sent to). Then your agent does all the work. Just be sure to tell them you can provide that for their file if they need it. thumbs_up.gif

mplaidgirl2 Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 2:26am
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motta

Hi Debi - good idea about taking the license, insurance, etc.

Please be aware that taking a copy of your insurance policy is not the same as a Certificate of Insurance. A C of I is issued by your agent and actually lists the hotel as an add'l insured (and ask them how they need this made out and get the email/fax number they need this sent to). Then your agent does all the work. Just be sure to tell them you can provide that for their file if they need it. thumbs_up.gif




I work in a business where we deal with COIs on a daily basis. 80% of the places can and will take a generic form just showing that you are insured. The other 20% are the biggest pains ever that require you to go back and forth with the insurer to add different things.

indydebi Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 4:15am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by mplaidgirl2

I work in a business where we deal with COIs on a daily basis. 80% of the places can and will take a generic form just showing that you are insured. The other 20% are the biggest pains ever that require you to go back and forth with the insurer to add different things.


good info! I must have been dealing with only those 20%!!!!! icon_lol.gif

mplaidgirl2 Posted 24 Apr 2011 , 12:53pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by mplaidgirl2

I work in a business where we deal with COIs on a daily basis. 80% of the places can and will take a generic form just showing that you are insured. The other 20% are the biggest pains ever that require you to go back and forth with the insurer to add different things.

good info! I must have been dealing with only those 20%!!!!! icon_lol.gif




ITs because those 20% are such pain you don't remember the easy ones lol.
We need about 5-10 a day and only need 1 or 2 filled out with all the businesses info. The fun ones are the ones that say they accept the generic ones until you get there and then have to scramble to get the correct one

Motta Posted 25 Apr 2011 , 12:50am
post #9 of 9

Thank you all for your helpful responses! Nice to hear that story about the hotel, Denay icon_smile.gif

Do you think I should take cake samples?

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