How To Keep Cake Fresh After Covering In Fondant

Decorating By monawhite_rose Updated 15 Jan 2016 , 8:37pm by jellybeanlane

monawhite_rose Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 8:53am
post #1 of 19

I've had cake orders where they wanted the cake to be covered in fondant but they wanted a filling that is perishable like mousse or buttercream.

I've always kept the cake in the cooler in the past after covering with fondant, but I've recently heard that I shouldn't do that because the fondant will absorb the moisture and fall off. I've never had that problem, but want to avoid it.

How should I go about keeping the cake fresh so no one gets sick and have it covered in fondant?

18 replies
specialtycakecreations Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 9:28am
post #2 of 19

I am guessing it has a lot to do with humidity in your area.
Same as you I started out putting fondant covered cakes in the fridge but after reading warnings about condensation and moisture I stopped doing that.

But some fillings can't stay out too long. So recently I started putting those in the fridge again. With no problems at all. I didn't see a single condensation drop set on after taking it out.
I live in Kelowna, which is dry with low humidity. My husband is from Calgary and always tells me that it was even less humid there.

So unless you are worrying that the moisture from the filling is affecting the fondant from the inside, I don't think there is any issue with keeping it in the fridge.

Cakepro Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 9:38am
post #3 of 19

You need to do what you KNOW works for you, not what others tell you.

I put every fondant-covered cake I do in the fridge, regardless of what filling is inside, and in all these years, I have never had any problem.

People will tell you all kinds of stuff, especially here. LOL

pattycakesnj Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 10:23am
post #4 of 19

If the filling is perishable, it needs to go in the fridge. If not, then I leave it out. Our walk in cooler has a humidity issue so we just keep the dehumidifier cranked up high in there.

maitej17 Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 1:05pm
post #5 of 19

I live down south where it's very humid and I've NEVER had my fondant fall off a cake that was placed in the fridge. I always my perishable filling cakes that are fondant covered in the fridge with out all the accents and decor, I do all that the morning of. If you have a problem w/condensation or sticky fondant when it comes out from the fridge, you can do 2 things, (1) place the cake in a cool room for a few hrs to let the condensation dry or (2) place a small fan near the cake and rotate it every few min until you see that it is no longer sticky (that's what I usually do). But I really wouldn't worry about it falling off. Sometimes too much internet information is not a good thing! Reminds me of the Bing commercials, "information overload"! icon_lol.gif If somethings working for you, don't listen to others mistakes. HTH icon_smile.gif

cakeandpartygirl Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 1:18pm
post #6 of 19

I think some of it has to do with what type of fondant that people are using. I use MFF (Michelle Foster's Fondant) and have put mine in the refrigerator with no problems!!

dukeswalker Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 1:44pm
post #7 of 19

I out all of mine in the fridge too with no problems - and I've done it with MMF, MFF & Sating Ice

MikeRowesHunny Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 2:55pm
post #8 of 19

Put the cake in a cardboard cake box before you put it in the fridge (invest in stacked cake boxes that you can reuse over and over). The temperature in the fridge will chill the cake, but the box will help keep the moisture out.

cakedout Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 3:07pm
post #9 of 19

icon_surprised.gif Whaaa...???? the fondant will "fall off" !!?? That's a new one!

The only other thing I would add to the advice already given, it that if your cake comes out with condensation, DO NOT TOUCH the fondant!! Wait until it dries!

tonedna Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 5:07pm
post #10 of 19

The condensation happens when the inside of your fridge is too cold and there is humidity out.
Here in Florida we are prone to that issue. Specially over the summer months. The fondant doesnt fall but it can sweat. You can raise the temperature of your fridge so the difference between inside and outside is not too much.
Or.. You can put the cake in a box to protect it. Each household will be different. Some people will have lots of problems, others will never. But it really depends on where you live.
I say make a test run to see what happens, and that way you know how to deal with the issue.

Edna icon_smile.gif

Cakepro Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 6:37pm
post #11 of 19

Refrigerators can't be warmer than 40 degrees F or foods will be in the danger zone. It's not realistic to raise the temperature of the fridge enough to decrease the temperature differential between room temp and fridge temp.

She already said she's been successful but was questioning her results because of what she's read/heard from others.

Monawhite_rose, you're fine to keep putting your cakes in the fridge! icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 8:21pm
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Refrigerators can't be warmer than 40 degrees F or foods will be in the danger zone. It's not realistic to raise the temperature of the fridge enough to decrease the temperature differential between room temp and fridge temp.

She already said she's been successful but was questioning her results because of what she's read/heard from others.

Monawhite_rose, you're fine to keep putting your cakes in the fridge! icon_smile.gif




That depends..you can have a refirgerator just for this purpose. SOme people do.
I dont suggest doing that in a refrigerator where you put things at home.
But, if you do it at home, put the cake in a box. It will save the cake from taking flavors of other foods.
Edna icon_smile.gif

jackie929 Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 9:31pm
post #13 of 19

I dont have a lot experience in this so, my silly question is what kind of box are we talking about a cake box? or a plastic box?
thanks

Mettek Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 9:52pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackie929

I dont have a lot experience in this so, my silly question is what kind of box are we talking about a cake box? or a plastic box?
thanks




a cardboard box - if you use plastic there's the humidity issue again

tonedna Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 10:55pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mettek

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackie929

I dont have a lot experience in this so, my silly question is what kind of box are we talking about a cake box? or a plastic box?
thanks



a cardboard box - if you use plastic there's the humidity issue again




thumbs_up.gif

CVB Posted 22 Apr 2011 , 11:57am
post #16 of 19

One thing that might make a difference is if you are keeing alot of items in your fridge that have moisture. ie veggies, fruit. If you reduce the humidity/ moisture in your fridge it will help. The box idea will help as well. I have never had a problem with a fondant covered cake in the fridge and we have crazy humidity here.

jackie929 Posted 22 Apr 2011 , 3:50pm
post #17 of 19

thts what I was thinking thnks ladies , but another question if you are going to put a cake in the freezer and I'm talking about a regular freezer (not commercial)do you put the cake in a plastic box?
thanks again

monawhite_rose Posted 23 Apr 2011 , 2:31am
post #18 of 19

Thanks everyone for the advice!

I live in calgary so my cakes never have condensation on them when I put the cakes in the cooler and the fondants never fallen off before but a co-worker told me not to so I was worried there. What worried me more was what to do with the cake if I had mousse in it. So thanks guys, I'll feel so much better keeping it in the cooler.

jellybeanlane Posted 15 Jan 2016 , 8:37pm
post #19 of 19

Ok so I was reading all the responses to her question and I had a couple of questions... Lol sry 

If placing the cake in a box in the fridge to keep the fondant from drying out is an option does it change the taste of the fondant and or cake?

Also placing it over night for a delivery at 10 am the following morning what time should it be taken out that morning to be sure it's not too cold and or sticky etc. 

I've never tried this and have a cake to do for Monday if anyone has around the arkansas area eesp and has advice that would be great! Thank you

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%