HoHo5 Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 12:26am

Just bought some disco dust, cant wait to try it but I was wonderin, Is it edible?
Can I put it on fondant pieces that I will be applying right on the cake?
Anybody that has used it, I'd appreciate you thoughts!!!
icon_biggrin.gif

40 replies
MamaMia808 Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 12:38am

Not "edible" but "non-toxic." There's another post on this somewhere. I think everyone there was saying that disco dust is exactly the same as non-toxic craft glitter. It won't make you sick but your body probably won't digest it (or something like that).

BlakesCakes Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 3:42am

It's fine grain plastic glitter and although non-toxic, it's not edible.

It should only be used on items that will be removed before eating.

Rae

srkmilklady Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 3:58am

I asked this last week and these are the responses I got....

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-7098968-.html#7098968

Chonte Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 4:07am

don't put it on anything that is going to be eaten. i don't know what you could use to get truly edible sparkle. i just called Madame Chocolat in LA because they were on the food network and they have "Glitter truffles" i asked what the glitter was because obviously they wouldn't cover a truffle in disco dust! She told me that her supplier will not tell what the secret is but it's totally safe and edible

BlakesCakes Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 4:18am

Yep, it comes up pretty much weekly.

The concept that lots of small plastic particles aren't harmful is an over-generalization.

People with diverticulitis or diverticulosis, Crohn's disease, IBS, etc. have to be very careful about consuming things that can stick in the creases of the intestinal lining--think strawberry seeds, kiwi seeds, nonpareils, etc.

Seeds don't digest easily and plastic doesn't digest at all. If those small things get stuck in that lining--even in a healthy person--serious infection can result.

Since fine plastic particles aren't something that the average person would even imagine would be on the food their eating, someone who is ordinarily very careful about their diet might be caught off guard.

Fact is, no one should have ever decided to put the stuff on food to begin with. Sometimes, "pretty" just isn't worth it.
Rae

Marianna46 Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 4:43am

Besides everything else, disco dust is very disagreeable to eat. It tastes like nothing and is extremely gritty. I know this because I tried it on a piece of fondant before I used it on a cake, not knowing that it was supposed to be removed before you ate the cake. It was so disgusting I decided not to use it. Just as well, because I was going to put it on something that wasn't actually removable!

srkmilklady Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 5:27am

You know what really bugs me is when you see these top notch cake decorators on tv putting the stuff everywhere on a cake in places that you know are going to be eaten. One show I saw last week, showed the exact same disco I had purchased and it was used on pieces that were definitely going to be eaten unless the baker sent instructions to peel all of that off before eating the cake. They all seem to use it, so we think it must be ok. And I can't believe that they inform their clients that "Oh, by the way, you can't eat that sparkly stuff that's all over your cake!"

I do use it occasionally but I don't sell my cakes, they are for my family and they all know about the disco dust discussions that have been here on CC. If the information has been passed on as to what this stuff really is, well if it doesn't matter to you, what can I say? I know my kids have eaten and passed worse things than that while growing up, as I'm sure most of us have.

I definitely agree that people with certain ailments have to be careful about consuming things that may cause further problems for them. And for that very reason, my father who did have diverticulitus had to be careful with what he put into his body. He loved the cakes I made, but because he knew about the disco dust, he just "ate around it" if I had put some on that particular cake. If he ate somewhere other than at home, he was extra vigilant as to what he consumed, as I would assume most people with dietary ailments would be or at least should be.

It is very true, that this stuff should have never been put out there in the first place if it wasn't considered food safe. However it is there and some will decide to use it and some won't. I guess if the proper warnings are presented, then it's up to us as individuals to decide what lines to step across where our health is concerned and then face the possible consequences as a result. Just my humble opinion.... icon_smile.gif

MikeRowesHunny Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 11:07am

and yet poisonous aspartame is rampantly consumed icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif

Reimagining_Confections Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 12:11pm

Aspartame controversy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The artificial sweetener aspartame has been the subject of several controversies since its initial approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1974. The FDA approval of aspartame was highly contested,[1] with critics alleging that the quality of the initial research supporting its safety was inadequate and flawed and that conflicts of interest marred the approval of aspartame.[2][3][4] In 1987, the U.S. Government Accountability Office concluded that the food additive approval process had been followed properly for aspartame.[2][5] In spite of this, critics like anti-aspartame activist Betty Martini[6] have promoted undocumented claims that numerous health risks (such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, methanol toxicity, blindness, spasms, shooting pains, seizures, headaches, depression, anxiety, memory loss, birth defects and death[7]) are associated with the consumption of aspartame in normal doses. These health risk claims have been examined and debunked by numerous scientific research projects, and are also generally dismissed by governments and major health and food safety organizations.[2][8][9]
Publicity of this controversy has been spread through an elaborate health scare[10] and "Internet smear campaign"[11] involving hoax[10][12][11] e-mails repeating Betty Martini's widely circulated conspiracy theory. Her undocumented claims are still repeated by thousands of self-published Web sites.
Aspartame has been found to be safe for human consumption by more than ninety countries worldwide,[13][14] with FDA officials describing aspartame as "one of the most thoroughly tested and studied food additives the agency has ever approved" and its safety as "clear cut".[4] The weight of existing scientific evidence indicates that aspartame is safe as a non-nutritive sweetener.[8]

foxymomma521 Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 12:19pm

You know, I saw that show too. At one point he refers to them as "Disco Truffles" or something along those lines. She also "bronzes" a chocolate bunny with luster dust which she claims is edible, but it's not...

HoHo5 Posted 20 Apr 2011 , 12:51pm

THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR HELP!!!
Glad I asked before I disco dusted everything! LOL!
Have a great day everyone! icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

Chonte Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 3:46am
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

You know, I saw that show too. At one point he refers to them as "Disco Truffles" or something along those lines. She also "bronzes" a chocolate bunny with luster dust which she claims is edible, but it's not...



your talking about the "Glitter Truffles" at Madame Chocolat!! it was on the food network. I called the shop yesterday to ask what they use. their glitter is definitely NOT disco dust. and since when is Luster dust not edible? i haven't heard this yet granted im not a professional. i use wilton pearl dust and i assume that it's the same thing just a different brand and wilton says it's edible, FDA approved and certified Kosher

BlakesCakes Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 3:56am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chonte

...since when is Luster dust not edible? i haven't heard this yet granted im not a professional. i use wilton pearl dust and i assume that it's the same thing just a different brand and wilton says it's edible, FDA approved and certified Kosher




Well, not all luster dusts are edible. Some are, again, merely "non-toxic". There are gold & silver "highlighter" luster dusts that are, indeed, marked for "decoration only", which is to say that they are to be used only on items that will be removed before eating. I also believe that there is a sapphire blue luster with the same designation, but I haven't seen it for awhile. For the most part, if it isn't marked FDA approved, or marketed as such, then it isn't edible.

There are a few FDA approved lusters out there. The one's I use are from Crystal Colors (sugarpaste.com). If I need a luster color that they don't have already made up, I mix their super pearl or bright silver pearl with a flat color from their line & it works very well.

The Wilton pearl dust isn't the same as most luster dusts. It's very "weak" and has a lot of filler in it. Either PS or CS--but I've forgotten at the moment. Yes, it is FDA approved, edible, & Kosher.

Rae

srkmilklady Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 4:00am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chonte

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

You know, I saw that show too. At one point he refers to them as "Disco Truffles" or something along those lines. She also "bronzes" a chocolate bunny with luster dust which she claims is edible, but it's not...


your talking about the "Glitter Truffles" at Madame Chocolat!! it was on the food network. I called the shop yesterday to ask what they use. their glitter is definitely NOT disco dust. and since when is Luster dust not edible? i haven't heard this yet granted im not a professional. i use wilton pearl dust and i assume that it's the same thing just a different brand and wilton says it's edible, FDA approved and certified Kosher




Not the same show I was referring to. The one I saw, they were definitely using DISCO DUST....not glitter. This was used on a cake, not on truffles...by a well known baker, on a well known show.

Chonte Posted 21 Apr 2011 , 5:32am

that's crazy cause the lady also covered a bunny in luster dust. and i never thought of mixing the dusts to get custom colors...GENIUS!!! thanks for the tip!!! icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

SunshineBaker Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 12:59pm

I was viewing wedding cakes online. I saw one cake that was totally covered in silver glitter and wondered what they had used, since I knew many glitters were "non-edible". I wrote to the bakery and asked what they used and got the reply that they used a non-toxic glitter called Disco Dust. I was very surprised that they did not know it is considered "non-edible".

tarabara Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 1:49pm

The only issue I have with this topic is that it seems to matter what country you're living in when determining way ether something's "edible". From the Sugarcraft website, on their page selling disco dust, luster dusts and petal dusts:

"Although these items are classified as "edible" in Europe, in the United States they are classed as "NON-TOXIC FOR DECORATION ONLY" AND NOT considered edible. Buy at your own discretion. Sugarcraft presumes no responsibility for use on food, nor will any refund be issued."

It's the same product but Britain's health department deems it safe to eat. (And, by the way, their health system is ranks higher than the US's so it's not like the professionals evaluating these items are somehow less qualified than those working at the FDA.) It doesn't change the fact that disco dust is made of very fine particles of plastic but it certainly makes me reexamine my perspective. I'd have to disagree about craft glitter being exactly the same thing as disco dust though. At least disco dust is presumably made in a food-safe factory, unlike scrapbooking glitter Same goes for all those other items that we find in the baking aisle that are cheaper in the scrapbooking, woodworking or flower arranging aisles (dowels, wires, etc). Some of those things can be washed so it may not be as big a deal but you'd have a hard time washing glitter. Not to get preachy. I just like to look at things from all angles.

Rosanaymi Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 2:32pm

If you eat a small amount of the stuff nothing will happen becauae its non- toxic. It is the same as if a kid eats a crayons, and lets faced it kids are very curious and sometimes they do this, nothing happens to them thats why they make kids crayons non-toxic because they will probably want to give it a taste. Your not going to eat the whole bottle but if you dust a cake and eat it in a small amount its ok

Panel7124 Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 3:57pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarabara


"Although these items are classified as "edible" in Europe..




Probably not in the whole Europe. In Switzerland they are considered non-edible, non-toxic, for decorative use only.

SammieB Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 4:44pm

Just for an on topic laugh, once when changing my daughter's diaper the day after a birthday party I foun bunches of glitter in there. It was definitely the non-edible craft kind. And she's just fine. icon_wink.gif

chrissypie Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 5:56pm

So, if you disco dust a few flowers to make them "jazzy" (lol!), that is ok as long as they are removed? I bought some disco dust to add some girly sparkle to flowers for my daughters cake, but I always remove those sort of things before serving. Would that be safe?

BlakesCakes Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 9:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarabara

disco dust is presumably made in a food-safe factory, unlike scrapbooking glitter.




Since it's NOT a food product, there is absolutely NO good reason to make this ASSUMPTION.

From what I have seen, as a result of knowing several people who re-package "disco dust" for re-sale in smaller quantities, there is nothing "special" about the way the glitter is made. It's bought in bulk from the same suppliers who supply craft companies.

Some of the glitters contain metals as well as plastics. icon_eek.gif YUCK!

Just because you've used it and "nothing bad has happened" doesn't mean it's something that should be used on an edible.

Those small particles can wreak havoc with anyone who has digestive isssues like Crohn's disease, diverticulitis, diverticulosis, etc.

Since a layman would think that what's on food is OK to eat, it could be disastrous should they consume some of this crap.

I don't have plastic or metal on my ingredient lists, so I won't use it--OR EAT IT.

Rae

carmijok Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 10:06pm

Of all the disgusting things that are perfectly allowed in food manufacturing...such as the acceptable amount of insect particles in chocolate...I think all the to-do about disco dust is overrated.

I wouldn't recommend eating it by the spoonfuls, but then, I wouldn't eat food coloring by the spoonful either. A small amount adds shine and bling to cakes and it hasn't affected my IBS one bit! It's not like people are going to eat it everyday in the huge quantities it would take to make someone sick. And it's usually sprinkled on decor that doesn't even get eaten!

BlakesCakes Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 10:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok


I wouldn't recommend eating it by the spoonfuls, but then, I wouldn't eat food coloring by the spoonful either. A small amount adds shine and bling to cakes and it hasn't affected my IBS one bit! It's not like people are going to eat it everyday in the huge quantities it would take to make someone sick. And it's usually sprinkled on decor that doesn't even get eaten!




I'm glad that it doesn't affect your IBS--but we don't all respond in exactly the same way to things, either.

No one knows what quantity could harm someone, as it hasn't been tested or regulated by a food monitoring agency.

If it were ONLY "usually sprinkled on decor that doesn't even get eaten", we wouldn't have to talk about it at all. It would mean that people were using it responsibly--but THEY'RE NOT.

I've seen it sprinkled--heavily--all over cookies & cake surfaces. icon_eek.gif

I see people asking about sprinkling it liberally all over buttercream surfaces for a really "blingy" look and when sanding sugar is suggested as an edible option, they balk at the texture--yet they seem perfectly happy to cover it in plastic craft glitter?????????????????

No, there's no problem putting on non-edibles and something to be removed before serving. I never said that there was a problem using it properly.

Rae

costumeczar Posted 28 Oct 2011 , 11:52pm

All I know is that when I tell brides that it's plastic glitter, they don't want it anymore, and they're horrified that people would put it on cake that's going to be eaten. I wouldn't put it on anything that's going to be eaten, and if I did use it on flowers or something I'd tell the client not to eat the gumpaste pieces that it was on. I use the Crystal Colors too, and their luster dusts are nice and shiiiiiiny.

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