Bride Signed Wrong Date On Her Contract...

Business By mom2spunkynbug Updated 18 Apr 2011 , 7:01pm by KoryAK

mom2spunkynbug Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 7:41pm
post #1 of 38

Ok, so I met with this bride last weekend and signed a contract for her wedding cake. I filled out most of the contract, including the date, she filled out her name, address, phone & email. I wrote the date as Saturday, April 16 2011.

I told her to fill out the top of the form, look over the rest of the form, and sign at the bottom. She mentioned nothing of the date and signed.

I just went to deliver the cake and the wedding is NOT today, it is NEXT Saturday, the 23rd.

Ok, sooooooo WTF do I do now?! I've been in business for about 4 years and this has never happened to me. Any and all advice is appreciated. (I know what I WANT to do, but I'm not gonna do that! LOL!) icon_mad.gificon_razz.gif

Thanks in advance

37 replies
WykdGud Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 7:59pm
post #2 of 38

So did they TELL you it was the 16th? Where did you get the date from unless they told you...? I'm confused...

KoryAK Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 8:13pm
post #3 of 38

Freeze it.

Brittany6231986 Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 8:40pm
post #4 of 38

ok why would a bride be ordering a cake 1 week before the wedding? or even 2 weeks before? that is crazy! and if she did tell you that it was the 16th I would freeze the cake....if it is not the best cake next week...its her fault but i think it will be fine! and if she did not tell you that....I would chum it up as a loss and make a new one next week!

cakesbycathy Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 10:31pm
post #5 of 38

Hopefully you can freeze it. If not, tell bride she can either have the cake you made for today -the date SHE put on the contract- or she can pony up the $$$ for you to make another one.

This is the BRIDE'S mistake. Not the decorator's. No way OP should have to come out of her pocket to pay for more ingredients.

pogostik Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 10:45pm
post #6 of 38

I'm sorry this happened but you are the one that wrote the wrong date.

tiggy2 Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 10:46pm
post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by pogostik

I'm sorry this happened but you are the one that wrote the wrong date.


thumbs_up.gif

dsilvest Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 10:56pm
post #8 of 38

You wrote the date as the 16th. She did not catch it. Who is at fault? Both of you unless she told you the date was the 23rd.
Hopefully you can freese it until next week.

costumeczar Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 12:17am
post #9 of 38

If she signed the contract then she approved the purchase of a cake for today. You need to call her and tell her that the cake is made and that she ordered it for today by signing the contract. I agree with giving her the option of paying for another one or arranging for freezing that one. Could the reception site hold it for her if you boxed it up and put it in their freezer?

Out of curiosity, why is she ordering a wedding cake one (or two) weeks before the wedding? That's really short notice.

I'd say that you should confirm all details three weeks out with each bride, but that obviously wasn't an option here.

labmom Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 1:46am
post #10 of 38

Your lucky you only had the date wrong.. I had a mom order a cake because the bride lived out of state. Everything was fine.. She gave me the date and time and paid for everything because she didn't want to worry about things at the last minute.

As I was doing my bake list of when to start things and what I needed to buy for this cake.. I noticed that the date was not a saturday. I have a few brides to be married on fridays or sundays but this was a Wednesday..yes I was confused.

I called the mom and she sounded puzzled on the phone when I told her why I was calling. She started laughing and said now she knew she was too stressed the wedding date is July 29 the said.. I don't know where my head is..

So it happens to everyone... just glad that we caught it.

leah_s Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 2:16am
post #11 of 38

Well, I'm going to be odd gal out. If the baker wrote the wrong dates on the contract, it's the baker's fault. This happened to me several years ago. The bride claims to have emailed with a postponement. I didn't get the email and showed up with the cake.

Oops.

I took it to the local Salvation Army kitchen and made her cake again on the correct date.

Pissing off brides is never a good idea, nor is arguing about who is at fault. They run in packs and every other bride in town will hear all about this if you make her take the cake a week early, or freeze this one. Bad PR.

tokazodo Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 2:18am
post #12 of 38

Mid February, I had someone contact me for a full sheet cake (100 servings) for the 25th. I mistakenly made the cake on February 25th when I didn't need it until March 25th. You can only imagine my surprise when I went to deliver the cake! No worries!

I took a bad thing and turned it into a good thing. I took it to work with me and fed it to the entire middle school. The kids loved me!
The liked the way the cake turned out the second time around.

Here's the cake: The additional photos are of the first cake (mistake)

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1983317

Mac Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 2:26am
post #13 of 38

Well, I actually had a bride contact me last week on the 6th for a wedding today 4-16th, so lots of brides do wait until the last minute.

JohnnyCakes1966 Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 3:13am
post #14 of 38

I agree with Leah. Sometimes what we WANT to do is not what we SHOULD do if we want to stay in business. To protect myself, for every event order, I have the client initial beside the date, time, and location of delivery.

In fact, I have them initial 7 things: that the deposit to reserve the date is non-refundable; down payment info; final payment info; cancellation policy; that the cake set/stand will be returned or they will be charged; delivery date, time, and location; and that they acknowledge that I have thoroughly gone over everything I had them initial.

No such thing as being too safe when it comes to your business!

jlynnw Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 3:49am
post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyCakes1966

I agree with Leah. Sometimes what we WANT to do is not what we SHOULD do if we want to stay in business. To protect myself, for every event order, I have the client initial beside the date, time, and location of delivery.

In fact, I have them initial 7 things: that the deposit to reserve the date is non-refundable; down payment info; final payment info; cancellation policy; that the cake set/stand will be returned or they will be charged; delivery date, time, and location; and that they acknowledge that I have thoroughly gone over everything I had them initial.

No such thing as being too safe when it comes to your business!




well said

scp1127 Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 4:22am
post #16 of 38

Agree with Leah_s all the way.

JulieMN Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 2:41pm
post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac

Well, I actually had a bride contact me last week on the 6th for a wedding today 4-16th, so lots of brides do wait until the last minute.




One of my sister's was a last-minute bride.....she knew she wanted a cake, but it wasn't one of her top priorities for the wedding. Next thing you knew, the wedding date was staring her right in the face. Fortunately she found a bakery that was able to accommodate her on relatively short notice. It does happen.

ConfectionsCC Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 3:21pm
post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Well, I'm going to be odd gal out. If the baker wrote the wrong dates on the contract, it's the baker's fault. This happened to me several years ago. The bride claims to have emailed with a postponement. I didn't get the email and showed up with the cake.

Oops.

I took it to the local Salvation Army kitchen and made her cake again on the correct date.

Pissing off brides is never a good idea, nor is arguing about who is at fault. They run in packs and every other bride in town will hear all about this if you make her take the cake a week early, or freeze this one. Bad PR.





I agree with Leah on this one! You said YOU filled out the contract, and although she was supposed to check to make sure everything is filled out correctly, you can not put her at fault for this because she doesn't do this everyday, you do. Donate the cake, make her a fresh one. Trust me, do not piss off the bride, wedding cakes are the big money makers, you do not want bad reviews on how you handled it poorly! She will make sure everyone knows she was right, you were wrong, even though its not really your fault 100%! Some people are saying freeze the cake, but your name is on everything you put out the door! Make sure you put quality over everything, it will make a difference!

lchristi27 Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 3:34pm
post #19 of 38

I have to agree as well, showing compassion to this bride (regardless of who's fault it is) will show great customer service on your part. Not to mention, brides have so much going on that it's hard to keep track of things.

Sorry this happened, such a frustration but you will reap benefits by keeping the customer happy.

Mac Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 4:02pm
post #20 of 38

The ONLY time I have frozen a decorated cake for a wedding was when the caterer who ordered the cake, told me the wrong date. This was the SAME caterer that used to pick up cakes he had ordered and deliver them, telling them he had decorated them.

costumeczar Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 7:00pm
post #21 of 38

So out of curiosity, if the bride had initialed the date and it was still wrong, would you all still be saying that you should go ahead and make another one? What's the limit to what you're responsible for and what the client is responsible for?

I still say that if the bride signed a contract for that date, then that's the date the cake was contracted for. Are you supposed to be a mind-reader?

If there had been more lead time I assume that the details would have been checked out. The only thing that I would suggest is that you start calling the venues early in the week before the wedding to confirm details of start time, etc. It's one way to make sure that you have everything in place in case the bride is being flaky.

leah_s Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 7:33pm
post #22 of 38

If the bride had completely filled out the contract AND written in the wrong date AND initialed the wrong date, then I *might* offer to make her another cake at 75% of retail, after she'd paid for the first one of course. Then again if she's totally and completely at fault, she might have to pay full price the second time.

costumeczar Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 8:05pm
post #23 of 38

I fill out the contracts myself, but if someone signs it then that's the day the cake is contracted for. It's in the contract that if the date changes from that date then I might not be available for the new date.

If I signed a contract without reading it then I can't expect the business to make good on something that wasn't contracted for. I asked about the short lead time because if I was contacted to do something on short notice like that, I'd assume that the bride had all the details correct since it would be unlikely that something would be changing at that point.

Let's say that the bride contracts for a 6:00 start time, and you have other deliveries that day that will let you deliver her cake in time for 6:00. Then you get a call that day as you're out delivering other things with the reception venue calling at 2pm saying where's the cake, the reception starts at 3:00. There's no way that you can get the cake there in time based on your other deliveries...Would you point to the contract that the bride signed to show that she contracted for a 6pm start? Or would you refund her money when she called to complain that you were "late" for the delivery?

Unfortunately in the OP's case it's not a theoretical questions. I just think it's interesting to go through these heinous scenarios to see what the options would be. Personally, I say that the contract is there to protect both the client and the business, so when you start saying that the bride isn't responsible for what she signs off on, you're opening a can of worms.

jlynnw Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 8:24pm
post #24 of 38

OP how are you dealing with the situation?

MikeRowesHunny Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 8:44pm
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I fill out the contracts myself, but if someone signs it then that's the day the cake is contracted for. It's in the contract that if the date changes from that date then I might not be available for the new date.

If I signed a contract without reading it then I can't expect the business to make good on something that wasn't contracted for. I asked about the short lead time because if I was contacted to do something on short notice like that, I'd assume that the bride had all the details correct since it would be unlikely that something would be changing at that point.

Let's say that the bride contracts for a 6:00 start time, and you have other deliveries that day that will let you deliver her cake in time for 6:00. Then you get a call that day as you're out delivering other things with the reception venue calling at 2pm saying where's the cake, the reception starts at 3:00. There's no way that you can get the cake there in time based on your other deliveries...Would you point to the contract that the bride signed to show that she contracted for a 6pm start? Or would you refund her money when she called to complain that you were "late" for the delivery?

Unfortunately in the OP's case it's not a theoretical questions. I just think it's interesting to go through these heinous scenarios to see what the options would be. Personally, I say that the contract is there to protect both the client and the business, so when you start saying that the bride isn't responsible for what she signs off on, you're opening a can of worms.




thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

When I contract a wedding cake, after the initial consult/tasting and they want to book, I send them my 'client info form' to fill in. This includes all the releveant info about them & their wedding. The contract dates/times are written from the info provided on this form BY THEM. So if this were to happen to me, I would say tough noogies to the bride! I also call the venue a few days ahead to let them know when to expect me, because waiting around for cake tables to be found and laid with linens etc annoys the crap out of me.

WykdGud Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 9:14pm
post #26 of 38

It sounded to me like OP got the date wrong, but was trying to transfer the blame onto the client by saying "well, they signed it!"

Perhaps I'm wrong?

Kitagrl Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 9:30pm
post #27 of 38

I would like to know if there are any emails to look back on and see what date was discussed...even in an initial contact email....to see if the correct date is anywhere in any correspondance.

Also was any contact made at all to confirm delivery or take care of last minute questions? How many times was the date mentioned or confirmed?

The big question, I guess, is WHY the OP got the date wrong. If the OP put the wrong date in the contract after being given the correct date, then it would be the OP's fault, mainly....although the bride should double check carefully, she may have assumed "We just talked, I'm sure this is fine." However if the OP can prove they were given the wrong date, then they would not be at fault nor required to make a brand new cake.

costumeczar Posted 17 Apr 2011 , 9:39pm
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by WykdGud

It sounded to me like OP got the date wrong, but was trying to transfer the blame onto the client by saying "well, they signed it!"

Perhaps I'm wrong?




I read it as the date was written, the bride signed it, and that's that. This would be similar to a bride not reading the proof of her invitations, so when they come back with her parents' names spelled wrong, it's her fault if her signature is on the proof form.

cakesbycathy Posted 18 Apr 2011 , 12:28am
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by WykdGud

It sounded to me like OP got the date wrong, but was trying to transfer the blame onto the client by saying "well, they signed it!"

Perhaps I'm wrong?



I read it as the date was written, the bride signed it, and that's that. This would be similar to a bride not reading the proof of her invitations, so when they come back with her parents' names spelled wrong, it's her fault if her signature is on the proof form.




This is a good analogy.
Before they sign I tell all my clients to look over the entire contract to make sure everything is correct before they sign. If the OP had her bride do this then it's really not the OP's fault.

I'm curious as to how the OP ended up handling the situation.

kellertur Posted 18 Apr 2011 , 3:26am
post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeRowesHunny

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I fill out the contracts myself, but if someone signs it then that's the day the cake is contracted for. It's in the contract that if the date changes from that date then I might not be available for the new date.

If I signed a contract without reading it then I can't expect the business to make good on something that wasn't contracted for. I asked about the short lead time because if I was contacted to do something on short notice like that, I'd assume that the bride had all the details correct since it would be unlikely that something would be changing at that point.

Let's say that the bride contracts for a 6:00 start time, and you have other deliveries that day that will let you deliver her cake in time for 6:00. Then you get a call that day as you're out delivering other things with the reception venue calling at 2pm saying where's the cake, the reception starts at 3:00. There's no way that you can get the cake there in time based on your other deliveries...Would you point to the contract that the bride signed to show that she contracted for a 6pm start? Or would you refund her money when she called to complain that you were "late" for the delivery?

Unfortunately in the OP's case it's not a theoretical questions. I just think it's interesting to go through these heinous scenarios to see what the options would be. Personally, I say that the contract is there to protect both the client and the business, so when you start saying that the bride isn't responsible for what she signs off on, you're opening a can of worms.



thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

When I contract a wedding cake, after the initial consult/tasting and they want to book, I send them my 'client info form' to fill in. This includes all the releveant info about them & their wedding. The contract dates/times are written from the info provided on this form BY THEM. So if this were to happen to me, I would say tough noogies to the bride! I also call the venue a few days ahead to let them know when to expect me, because waiting around for cake tables to be found and laid with linens etc annoys the crap out of me.




YEP thumbs_up.gif

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