Doubling A Cannoli Cake Recipe -- Help Please????

Baking By JGMB Updated 19 Apr 2011 , 4:27pm by JGMB

JGMB Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 12:16pm
post #1 of 14

I need to make a Cannoli Cake to feed 32 people. I've never made one before, but found a recipe on the internet that feeds 16. It's a 10-inch round.

Should I make 2 10" rounds and stack them to make a taller cake that you'd just cut into smaller slices, or should I use a bigger pan to begin with?

Oh, and can I say that I've never even seen or tasted a cannoli cake either??? So, I hope I'm not in over my head! TIA icon_razz.gif

13 replies
whisperingmadcow Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 12:58pm
post #2 of 14

I would double the length of the cake, not the height. If you double the height, you will end up with 16 really tall slices.

I am not sure on the design, but maybe you could make a tiered cake or a sheet cake?

Hope that helps!

ashleyb4 Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 1:52pm
post #3 of 14

They are cutting some big slices! A 10 inch round is about 38 servings

http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm

If they want bigger servings than standard (which is plenty), then I would double the recipe and make a 6in and 8in, tiered. Traditional Cannoli cake is DELICIOUS!!!! Are u using a recipe with alcohol?

LindaF144a Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 3:12pm
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMB

I need to make a Cannoli Cake to feed 32 people. I've never made one before, but found a recipe on the internet that feeds 16. It's a 10-inch round.

Should I make 2 10" rounds and stack them to make a taller cake that you'd just cut into smaller slices, or should I use a bigger pan to begin with?

Oh, and can I say that I've never even seen or tasted a cannoli cake either??? So, I hope I'm not in over my head! TIA icon_razz.gif




Where did you find the recipe? I've never heard of a cannoli cake.

ashleyb4 Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 3:17pm
post #5 of 14

Check out the deliciousness...

http://www.food.com/recipe/cannoli-cake-126279

JGMB Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 3:26pm
post #6 of 14

Honestly, I'd never heard of one either until our alderman called to ask for one for Monday's city council meeting!

I just decided maybe I'd better give it a test run, since I found the recipe online. There's one 10" round in the oven right now. That way, I can decide whether to go vertical with it when I double it, or make it in a rectangular pan.

I'll keep you posted!

And, Ashley B4, it says you can use orange liqueur or OJ. Which would you recommend?

ashleyb4 Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 3:32pm
post #7 of 14

Traditionally it is orange liqueur. With it being for a council meeting... I'm not so sure. I'd ask the alderman which he would prefer.

LindaF144a Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 3:47pm
post #8 of 14

So, it's a cake with cannoli filling, not a cake with cannoli pastry cream incorporated into the cake.

Two different things to me. One is a cake with a filling just like any other layered cake. Why is a cannoli cake different than a layered cake? Am I missing something?

JGMB Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 4:05pm
post #9 of 14

Linda, it's the ricotta/chocolate chip filling that earns it the title of "Cannoli Cake". Otherwise, if you filled it with BC or something, it would just be a layer cake.

LindaF144a Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 4:10pm
post #10 of 14

Okay, I see.

Although to me a layer cake can be filled with anything you want, it doesn't have to be BC. But that is just how I describe it. I'll know when one talks about a cannoli cake that it is not baked with the cannoli cream.

Thanks for the clarification.

ashleyb4 Posted 16 Apr 2011 , 4:11pm
post #11 of 14

A cannoli cake is a traditional Italian dessert, originally called Cassata Cake. The layers are vanilla cake, brushed with Grand Marnier, and filled with a ricotta/mascarpone cannoli filling. Frosting is a light whipped butter based. Of course there are variations, but this is the "original". I've had it with just the cannoli cream filling, but the orange flavor gives it that little oomph.

JGMB Posted 18 Apr 2011 , 1:37am
post #12 of 14

Okay, it's made and in the frig! I ended up making the sponge cake in a 9x13" pan. The filling tasted good, but had a strange mouth feel to me. The frosting was to die for -- I could've eaten the whole bowl!!!

Now, I just hope it gets firm enough to allow for delivery time and a short council meeting and that it won't be runny by the time it's cut and served.

I tried to attach a photo here, but it wouldn't work. The cake looks like a nice, billowy cloud topped with chocolate shavings. icon_smile.gif

JGMB Posted 19 Apr 2011 , 12:26am
post #13 of 14

I just delivered the cake and the guy seemed happy with it. He popped it into his office frig until after the Council Meeting. I offered to stay around and serve it, but he said that wasn't necessary. I was a little disappointed, as I wanted to taste it myself and, also, to see if it was well received by the crowd. Oh, well, at least I left with a $75 check in hand for my favorite charity!! Here's the link to the photo: http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2008658

JGMB Posted 19 Apr 2011 , 4:27pm
post #14 of 14

Okay, this is my last writing about this, I promise!!!

I was just sooooo worried that this cake was going to be runny or yucky and that I'd have to be embarrassed.

I just got an unsolicited e-mail from someone who attended the meeting and she said people RAVED about the cake, asked who made it, etc. She said they even talked about promoting my charity baking on the city's website.

I'm so relieved!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! thumbs_up.gif

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