CAC74 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 2:46am
post #1 of

I have a question about sheet cakes... I've seen on different websites that people advertise 1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet, full sheet and then the prices. Does anyone know what this translates to in pan size? I only have an 11x15 at this time, and just curious how to 'label' it. Also, from the reasearch I've done, an 11x15 sheet feeds about 30 people. Do you all usually put a second layer on sheets to double the servings? Or just leave it the single layer. I'm really new to sheet cakes, I usually do rounds and tiers. Any info/help is much appreciated!! Thanks! icon_biggrin.gif

Also... what's the average cost for a sheet cake?

26 replies
CWR41 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:28am
post #2 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet, full sheet
Does anyone know what this translates to in pan size?




9x13, 12x18, 16x24. http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

I wrote this in another thread about full sheets:

A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

I only have an 11x15 at this time, and just curious how to 'label' it.




1/3 sheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

Do you all usually put a second layer on sheets to double the servings? Or just leave it the single layer.




Sheets are single layer. Kitchen cakes are double layer.

sari66 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:30am
post #3 of

Welcome, my sheets are as follows 9x13 is quarter, 11x15 is a third and 12x18 is a full. These are the sizes that I offer and I sell them not as a sheet but a rectangle as I double them with a filling and I double the servings. A sheet is typically one layer that you get from the grocer. If you flip your pan over you can measure how many serving you can get from that pan using 2" for your sizes. So yes, your 11x15 will make 30 servings one layer or 60 for two.
hth

NanaSandy Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:31am
post #4 of

This is what I found when I did a search for your answer.


The rectangular pan that most home bakers are familiar with (and that 1 box of Duncan Hines, Betty Crocker or Pillsbury cake mix will make one of) is the quarter sheet pan, which measures 13"x9", with a depth of either 2 or 3 inches. If you laid 4 of these pans together, this would be approx. the size of a full sheet. Hopefully the "chart" below will answer your other questions.

Pan name measurement # of 2-inch 2-inch "party" servings
Quarter sheet 13-inches x 9-inches 20
Half sheet 12-inches x 18-inches 40
3/4 sheet 18-inches x 18-inches 60
Full sheet 18-inches x 30-inches 80

Hope this helps.

CWR41 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:35am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sari66

Welcome, my sheets are as follows 9x13 is quarter, 11x15 is a third and 12x18 is a full. These are the sizes that I offer and I sell them not as a sheet but a rectangle as I double them with a filling and I double the servings. A sheet is typically one layer that you get from the grocer. If you flip your pan over you can measure how many serving you can get from that pan using 2" for your sizes. So yes, your 11x15 will make 30 servings one layer or 60 for two.
hth




The 12x18 is a half sheet... put two together and it's a bit larger than a true commercial full sheet. (full sheets won't fit in a home oven.)

CWR41 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:38am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

This is what I found when I did a search for your answer.


The rectangular pan that most home bakers are familiar with (and that 1 box of Duncan Hines, Betty Crocker or Pillsbury cake mix will make one of) is the quarter sheet pan, which measures 13"x9", with a depth of either 2 or 3 inches. If you laid 4 of these pans together, this would be approx. the size of a full sheet. Hopefully the "chart" below will answer your other questions.

Pan name measurement # of 2-inch 2-inch "party" servings
Quarter sheet 13-inches x 9-inches 20
Half sheet 12-inches x 18-inches 40
3/4 sheet 18-inches x 18-inches 60
Full sheet 18-inches x 30-inches 80

Hope this helps.




Don't know how to bake an 18x30 full sheet when the pans aren't that long.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:46am
post #7 of

CWR41 is correct and what the grocery stores have now considered a half sheet, (11x15) is actually more like a 1/3 sheet but instead of raising prices they have cut the size to increase profit. Ok sorry about the rant! LOL What I have done is let go of the sizes and just go by servings. I have found that people understand more of how many people they want to feed.

NanaSandy Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 3:48am
post #8 of

CWR41: now that I look at that closer...your right.

so now I am confused. What do you use to make a full sheet pan? Do you use 2 half sheet pans? What size pan do you use for your half sheet?

cakeandpartygirl Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 4:10am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

CWR41: now that I look at that closer...your right.

so now I am confused. What do you use to make a full sheet pan? Do you use 2 half sheet pans? What size pan do you use for your half sheet?




my home oven won't fit a full sheet so I bake 2 12x18's and put them on a really sturdy board and ice and decorate as usual

indydebi Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 7:23am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl

CWR41 is correct and what the grocery stores have now considered a half sheet, (11x15) is actually more like a 1/3 sheet but instead of raising prices they have cut the size to increase profit. Ok sorry about the rant! LOL What I have done is let go of the sizes and just go by servings. I have found that people understand more of how many people they want to feed.


Bingo on this one! Its on my LONG list of reasons why I refuse to use the terms "half" and "full" when describing a sheet cake. I would tell someone my half sheet is $75 and they would tell me "the grocery's 1/2 sheet is $50" and I'd have to explain to them that the grocery's half sheet is NOT a half sheet and its not as big as my LEGIT half sheet.

My primary reason for not using the terms is because most cake civilians have no freakin' clue how big those cakes are to start with....

Them: How much for a half sheet cake?
me: I dont' know .... how big IS a half sheet cake?
Them: Gosh I dont' know!
Me (thinking to myself): Then what the heck are you doing ordering something that you have NO IDEA what you are ordering!?

One guy, I swear to god, asked me for a full sheet cake price. I asked how many people he needed to serve. He told me TEN! TEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I said, "Then why would you want to pay for 100 servings just to feed 10 people?" icon_confused.gif

They ask me "how much for a blah blah sheet cake?" I ask them how many peole they need to feed. They tell me. I then tell THEM what size cake they will need.

CAC74 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 1:53pm

Thanks Everyone!! This is why I LOVE CC!! You are all so helpful! icon_biggrin.gif

cakeandpartygirl Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 8:50pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl

CWR41 is correct and what the grocery stores have now considered a half sheet, (11x15) is actually more like a 1/3 sheet but instead of raising prices they have cut the size to increase profit. Ok sorry about the rant! LOL What I have done is let go of the sizes and just go by servings. I have found that people understand more of how many people they want to feed.

Bingo on this one! Its on my LONG list of reasons why I refuse to use the terms "half" and "full" when describing a sheet cake. I would tell someone my half sheet is $75 and they would tell me "the grocery's 1/2 sheet is $50" and I'd have to explain to them that the grocery's half sheet is NOT a half sheet and its not as big as my LEGIT half sheet.

My primary reason for not using the terms is because most cake civilians have no freakin' clue how big those cakes are to start with....

Them: How much for a half sheet cake?
me: I dont' know .... how big IS a half sheet cake?
Them: Gosh I dont' know!
Me (thinking to myself): Then what the heck are you doing ordering something that you have NO IDEA what you are ordering!?

One guy, I swear to god, asked me for a full sheet cake price. I asked how many people he needed to serve. He told me TEN! TEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I said, "Then why would you want to pay for 100 servings just to feed 10 people?" icon_confused.gif

They ask me "how much for a blah blah sheet cake?" I ask them how many peole they need to feed. They tell me. I then tell THEM what size cake they will need.




And you, indydebi, are the very reason why I let it go!! thumbs_up.gificon_biggrin.gif

amcakemaker2011 Posted 14 Apr 2011 , 11:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

1/4 sheet, 1/2 sheet, full sheet
Does anyone know what this translates to in pan size?



9x13, 12x18, 16x24. http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

I wrote this in another thread about full sheets:

A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

I only have an 11x15 at this time, and just curious how to 'label' it.



1/3 sheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAC74

Do you all usually put a second layer on sheets to double the servings? Or just leave it the single layer.




What do you mean by Kitchen cakes? If you are making a sheet cake you can add a 2nd layer to it right too feed more?

Sheets are single layer. Kitchen cakes are double layer.


CWR41 Posted 15 Apr 2011 , 12:09am
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcakemaker2011

What do you mean by Kitchen cakes? If you are making a sheet cake you can add a 2nd layer to it right too feed more?




Of course... a.k.a. a kitchen cake.

Imegahan Posted 9 Jan 2013 , 3:00pm

You are phenomenal! 

macdonaldb Posted 29 Sep 2013 , 12:52pm

AHello, I have a question about sheet cakes. If a 11x15 sheet pan serves 30 ( I would think it would serve more) and its a single layer how does a double layer filled serve 60. The cake didn't grow in length just in height. So do you make the slices smaller or cut in half where you added the filling. I get the same amount of pieces filled or not filled. Appreciate any help Thanks

CWR41 Posted 29 Sep 2013 , 4:48pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by macdonaldb 

So do you make the slices smaller

Yes... single layers are cut into 2x2x2 slices, double layers into 1x2x4 slices.

CakesbyGeorge Posted 29 Sep 2013 , 5:49pm

I use a 10x15 sheet and always one layer.  I can divide into 35 2x2 squares or 60 3x1 slices.

 

A 12x18 can be divided into 54 2x2 squares or 84 3x1 slices.

 

You can get these K & S Quik Press Cake Dividers from CK Products 

macdonaldb Posted 30 Sep 2013 , 12:01pm

AThank you everyone for your help.

SweetSinsationz Posted 31 Oct 2013 , 8:07pm

12x18 is a cookie sheet no? how do you go about baking a cake in that??

kimbm04r Posted 31 Oct 2013 , 10:59pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by SweetSinsationz 
 

12x18 is a cookie sheet no? how do you go about baking a cake in that??

No, a 12 x 18 cake pan is 2" deep.

SweetSinsationz Posted 31 Oct 2013 , 11:47pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by kimbm04r 
 

No, a 12 x 18 cake pan is 2" deep.


oh, well i must get one haha i only have a 12x18 cookie sheet XD

sweetheart1978 Posted 1 Nov 2013 , 10:30pm

Hi there. I'm new to making sheet cakes. I wanted to find out if a normal cake mixture can be used in making sheet cakes please :)

SweetSinsationz Posted 1 Nov 2013 , 10:32pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by sweetheart1978 
 

Hi there. I'm new to making sheet cakes. I wanted to find out if a normal cake mixture can be used in making sheet cakes please :)

for an 8' or 9' you can usually use a 9x13 pan

sweetheart1978 Posted 1 Nov 2013 , 10:37pm

Great! Thank you SweetSinsationz ;-D

Amanda_K_Bass Posted 10 Jun 2015 , 12:59am

I realize this thread is a couple of years old, but I hope someone sees it. I need to make a cake to feed 50 people. I noticed that Publix sells a cake that they label as a 3/4 sheet cake that feeds 60. I don't get many requests for this type of cake so I really hate to go buy a special pan for this. I wonder if there is a way to make it with 9x13 pans and put them together on a cake board?? Any ideas?

CWR41 Posted 10 Jun 2015 , 3:39pm


Quote by @Amanda_K_Bass on 13 hours ago

I need to make a cake to feed 50 people. I noticed that Publix sells a cake that they label as a 3/4 sheet cake that feeds 60.

12 x 18 1/2 sheet = 54 servings

Quote by @%username% on %date%

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