Cherry Blossom Branches...

Decorating By CiNoRi Updated 12 Apr 2011 , 5:43am by SweetCakesbyAmy

CiNoRi Posted 8 Apr 2011 , 7:21pm
post #1 of 7

Hi all,

I am sure this has probably been answered... but i can't seem to find anything on here.

I am looking to do my first cherry blossom cake soon. I plan to cut, veine, and dry the flowers early...

I have seen where people use fondant, pipe, or modeling Chocolate to do the branches right on the cake. But how are the branches that stand off the cake created? I had thought about dipping wire in chocolate... but no sure how easy that would be to work with/ or how easy it would be to dip/ cover such and odd shape.

Does anyone know of a good tutorial or video on doing these?

Thanks!

6 replies
langranny Posted 8 Apr 2011 , 7:45pm
post #2 of 7

Modeling chocolate. I made a snowman cake this winter and used MC for the "arms". They looked almost real.

CiNoRi Posted 8 Apr 2011 , 7:49pm
post #3 of 7

oh yeah I forgot to mention, the weather is getting warmer here and last i used Modeling Chocolate, it never hardened. I'll probably make some early in hope that it will work... but a backup plan would be sweet! icon_wink.gif

CiNoRi Posted 8 Apr 2011 , 8:50pm
post #4 of 7
DeniseNH Posted 8 Apr 2011 , 10:13pm
post #5 of 7

I've done several and how I handled it was to gather several lengths of cloth covered wire and wound it with brown florist tape. As you work your way up the branch, bend a few of the wires to the left and right and cover in brown florist tape then clip to the correct length. You can make some of the flowers on wires and secure them to the wire branch and leave others unwired and sprinkle here and there. To secure the branch to the cake once you've incorporated the twists and bends needed, wind a few pieces of wire around the branch and cover with florist tape - twist them and pinch with needle nose pliers - make sure the wires are in the back and when pushed into the cake will act like toothpicks to keep the branch securely against the cake. Write a note to the hall manager making sure they remove the branch before cutting and serving but letting them know that the scattered flowers are OK to eat.

Terri66 Posted 10 Apr 2011 , 12:27pm
post #6 of 7

Hi,
I would use wire...you know that hard "flower" stem kind and cover it in green floral ribbon first, then chocolate fondant. The wire can be bent in any shape or direction and the fondant won't melt like modelling chocolate in heat. You could run a fork over the fondant when its formed to give it textured look like bark. When the cake is removed to cut it and pieces are being handed out to the guests, the branches are just set aside. The flowers are still edible, as are the leaves.

SweetCakesbyAmy Posted 12 Apr 2011 , 5:43am
post #7 of 7

Cover some grape twigs in royal icing. It looks great!

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