The Bottom Crust On White Cakes: How To Remove/avoid? Agbay?

Baking By SugarFiend Updated 9 Apr 2011 , 12:31am by tigachu

SugarFiend Posted 6 Apr 2011 , 12:53am
post #1 of 5

Does anyone know what I'm talking about? I know this might sound bizarre to be concerned about, but the bottom crusts of my white and yellow cakes are always visible and stick out like a sore thumb, especially if I'm using white icing to torte and fill. I want them to be ALL white, with no crust line.

(This came to my attention after I made a Ron Ben Israel vanilla cake and compared my sliced cake to the pic in the magazine. While mine, like his, was straight and even, mine had a more "homemade" look to it. It took me a few minutes to realize it was the crust. His lacked the crust line and looked SO much better.)

Using parchment circles in the bottom of the pan doesn't help, and I'm trying to avoid flipping the cake upside down to "level" the bottom. I also hate the idea of losing more cake to another leveling. Can an Agbay do this, for those who have one? Or maybe there's a way of treating the parchment circles so that they stick to the cake just enough to sort of peel away that crust?

It just seems like if a wedding cake is gonna be white, it should be white white white.

Does anyone have any thoughts? Thanks in advance!

4 replies
honeypie Posted 7 Apr 2011 , 3:59am
post #2 of 5

Hi Sherri, I know exactly what you are talking about and I totally agree with you. I should first tell you that I am Maureen Agbay as in Agbay Cake Levelers. I dont usually post, but this was brought to my attention and I thought I might be able to help answer this question for you as you've asked about an Agbay.

On every white cake (or yellow) that I do, I set my Leveler 1/8 higher than I want the layer to be before I cut off the crown. After leveling the crown, I do flip the cake over, set the Leveler down 1/8 and cut the brown bottom right off. Growing up helping my parents do cakes, we always lined the bottom of our cake pans with wax paper. I dont remove the wax paper from the cake because it helps in several ways. First, it seals in moisture. Second, it almost glues the cake to the table so that it doesnt move when I level it. And third, when I cut that 1/8 off the bottom, it simply helps me to peel away that bottom layer, wax paper and all with practically no loss of cake.

Then I have nice white icing on white cake without the brown line through it. I can tell you that this is how I do it very easily with our Levelers. Im sure others can offer you advice on how they do it.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions at all. Good Luck!

SugarFiend Posted 7 Apr 2011 , 2:21pm
post #3 of 5

Wow, thank you so much, Maureen! I've been contemplating getting an Agbay for awhile now, and this is one more check mark in the "just get it" column. icon_rolleyes.gif It would be so nice to get rid of that brown line without mangling the bottom of my cake!

Using the steps you described, am I correct in understanding that the single-blade model might be simpler to use if I were to level, remove the crust, and tort? It would require three separate blade adjustments and three passes, but would reduce the possibility of confusion about where the blades should be for each pass. For me, anyway. (Although I could also see how the 2-blade model could be used, removing one blade for the first levelling, flipping the cake, and then using both blades to remove the crust and tort at the same time...)

Hm. Just "thinking out loud" here... Can they accommodate 3 blades at once? That would be EXCELLENT: One pass to level, tort, and remove the crust all at once. A wedding cake would be done in seconds! icon_biggrin.gif

Thank you again!

honeypie Posted 7 Apr 2011 , 5:48pm
post #4 of 5

While the single blade leveler is very easy and quick to adjust, you are right that it would take three cuts. If doing multiple layers (as in a wedding cake) that all require the same cuts, to save time,make all the cuts you need for each height adjustment at the same time.

With the Agbay Deluxe, you seldom would very need to remove the upper blade frame. Simply lift the upper blade to its highest position and leave the blade guard on while you cut the crown off using the lower blade. Then flip your cake over and set both blades at your desired heights. For example: you have a 3 cake that you want to level, split and remove the bottom brown layer. Your first cut would be with the bottom blade set at 3 1/8 to cut the crown off. Then flip the cake over and set the top blade at 3 and the bottom blade at 1 ½. This way you remove the brown bottom layer and get all three cuts with two passes of your leveler. I hope this makes sense.

If most of your cakes are leveled and split, the upper blade could be set and youd only need to change the lower blade setting when doing those white cakes.

As for a third blade, it wouldnt work with this design. Each blade has its own frame because each blade is under its own tension. Thats part of what gives you those perfectly flat level cuts and allows slicing through nuts and chocolate chips.

Let me know if you have any other questions or need further clarification.

tigachu Posted 9 Apr 2011 , 12:31am
post #5 of 5

I just received my Agbay Deluxe last week! It arrived in just 3 days!! icon_lol.gif I have always wanted to get one but especially after making my own anniversary cake. I worried silly trying to level and it leaned!! icon_eek.gif Luckily, it didn't fall icon_redface.gif but still embarassing to say the least. I always kind of "rubbed" the crust off of the tops, bottoms, and sides. Now I can use my Agbay!

I have a way to go before my cakes will look perfect but at least they will be perfectly levelled! icon_cool.gif

As you can already tell, Maureen's customer service is both awesome and almost unheard of nowadays. thumbs_up.gif

You will not regret it!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%