Before Or After?

Decorating By nikkigonzalez Updated 3 Apr 2011 , 10:23pm by wiggler

nikkigonzalez Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 9:22pm
post #1 of 9

When a recipe calls for powdered sugar or flour sifted, do you measure it out first, then sift before mixing....or do you measure it out after its been sifted???

8 replies
wiggler Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 9:47pm
post #2 of 9

I do it at the same time ! I place a bowl on my digital scales and sift the flour / sugar in to the bowl until it weighs what I need .

DanaG21 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 9:48pm
post #3 of 9

I recall hearing that if the word is before like 1 c sifted flour - then you sift then measure. Or it would be 1 c flour sifted then you measure and then sift. Hope this helps!

indydebi Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 9:58pm
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaG21

I recall hearing that if the word is before like 1 c sifted flour - then you sift then measure. Or it would be 1 c flour sifted then you measure and then sift. Hope this helps!


Agree. That's how we were taught when a Home Ec class was still called "Home Ec"! icon_biggrin.gif

Gerle Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 9:59pm
post #5 of 9

I heard it for years the same as Dana. If the word sift is before the ingredient, it's sifted, then measured. If the word sifted is after the ingredient, you measure, then sift.

wiggler Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 10:04pm
post #6 of 9

As a beginner , I am wondering what difference it makes ? Seems ok for me either way ? icon_redface.gif

indydebi Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 10:07pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggler

As a beginner , I am wondering what difference it makes ? Seems ok for me either way ? icon_redface.gif


If you measure one cup of flour ... then sift it .... then measure one cup of the sifted flour ..... you'll have about 2 teaspoons or 2 Tablespoons (can't remember which) of flour left over.

Had to teach an (ex) sister in law this once when she complained that she couldn't make a certain recipe and how hers tasted too heavy. She then confessed that "Oh I don't sift! That doesnt' make any difference!" Well, with 4 cups of flour, she was adding about 8 more spoons of flour to the mixture! When I pointed that out and showed her that why it was coming out "heavy", she got it.

So yes .... when measuring it out, sifting DOES make a difference.

FromScratchSF Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 10:12pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggler

As a beginner , I am wondering what difference it makes ? Seems ok for me either way ? icon_redface.gif




1 cup of sifted flour means sift flour direct into your cup. 1 cup flour, sifted means scoop or spoon 1 cup of flour then sift it to add air. Problem is they weigh totally different, possibly as much as 1 oz! That's why weighing is the preferred method, because 7 oz sifted flour weighs the same as 7 oz flour, sifted.

wiggler Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 10:23pm
post #9 of 9

Thanks guys . I am learning so much from all of you ! Much appreciated

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