Serving Sizes

Decorating By tbmichals Updated 3 Apr 2011 , 8:39pm by tbmichals

tbmichals Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:46pm
post #1 of 9

I have been searching the internet before asking this and have read so many different things that I thought I would ask. I am going to make a cake that needs to feed 20-25 people. I am using a 2" pan and usually make them 3 1/2-4" high. I will not be cutting the cake so I can only assume how big they will be. Thought about telling her to cut them 1 1/2x2x4. So do I need a 10 or 12 round? Her budget is lower than I usually do ($60) so I don't want to go bigger if I don't need to. Thanks....

8 replies
Marianna46 Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 11:46pm
post #2 of 9

According to Wilton's guide for cutting wedding cakes (1" x 2" x 4" slices), you get 36 servings from a 10" round. If you want to cut them a little larger, you should still be able to get 20-25 servings from one that size. By the way, if you want to make the cake cutter's job easier, slip her a print-out of Indydebi's blog post on how to cut wedding cakes - it makes everything SO much easier that the traditional way! Here's the link:
http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/search/label/cake%20comb

CWR41 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 1:17am
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbmichals

I am going to make a cake that needs to feed 20-25 people. I am using a 2" pan and usually make them 3 1/2-4" high. I will not be cutting the cake so I can only assume how big they will be. Thought about telling her to cut them 1 1/2x2x4. So do I need a 10 or 12 round?




You'll get 26 (12 cu. in.) servings from a 10" round.

See The Cake Calculator by Metria:
http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator_byVolume.cgi

CWR41 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 1:25am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbmichals

Her budget is lower than I usually do ($60) so I don't want to go bigger if I don't need to. Thanks....




Since the 10" round actually serves 38 (industry standard 8 cu. in.) servings, the $60 budget divided by 38 = $1.58 per serving. Do you normally charge $1.58 per serving? If not, it's something to consider before you decide what size to quote or bake. Her $60 will only go so far.

CWR41 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 1:25am
post #5 of 9

Duplicate post.

tbmichals Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 2:38am
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41



You'll get 26 (12 cu. in.) servings from a 10" round.

See The Cake Calculator by Metria:
http://shinymetalobjects.net/cake/calculator/cake_calculator_byVolume.cgi




I haven't ever seen this, thank you! So if I did 1x2x4 I could get 31 servings from a 9"? And if I slipped her Indydebi's blog post on how to cut it she should get the servings right?
These could be my two new favorite tools. I am questioning this every time I do a cake.
I told her I would do a cake to feed 20-25, I haven't told her a size. She is a friend of mine and we have been emailing back and forth. That's why I wanted to make sure I didn't supply her with a cake to feed 40 and waste my profit.

CWR41 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 3:48am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbmichals

I haven't ever seen this, thank you! So if I did 1x2x4 I could get 31 servings from a 9"?




31.7925 rounded up to 32 servings.
32 servings on the Wilton Chart:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbmichals

And if I slipped her Indydebi's blog post on how to cut it she should get the servings right?




Perhaps, or she can use the Wilton wedding cake cutting guide:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/cake-cutting-guides/wedding-cake-cutting-guide.cfm

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbmichals

I told her I would do a cake to feed 20-25, I haven't told her a size. She is a friend of mine and we have been emailing back and forth. That's why I wanted to make sure I didn't supply her with a cake to feed 40 and waste my profit.




If the 8" serves 24, why would you want to give her a 9" that serves more than what she needs? You must be a true friend! You didn't mention your per serving price, but I think most would charge at least $3 per serving and give her a 7" that serves 19 for her $60 budget (for non-friends). JMO.

Marianna46 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 5:53pm
post #8 of 9

For some reason, I always forget about Metria's great calculator! But no more - I just put a reminder in with my other cake tables (the ones for batter, icing, etc.), so I'll always remember it. I suggested Indydebi's serving guide because I've used it and it seems easier to me than the Wilton guides which have you cut a circle inside the cake. For some reason, I never can cut that circle right in the middle! With Indydebi's guide, you cut a round cake just like a square or rectangular one.

tbmichals Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 8:39pm
post #9 of 9

I have actually cut a couple of my cakes using Indydebi's method. Works well. It will take a little practice with the laying it down without it falling first and making a mess. That's probably just me though. What can go wrong, usually will.

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