Swiss Meringue Bc

Baking By Kitagrl Updated 2 Apr 2011 , 11:50pm by blissfulbaker

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 5:56pm
post #1 of 46

I'm going to try out some swiss meringue buttercream for the first time this week...I don't care for my current recipe of non-crusting bc and would like to change.

Two questions...first can leftovers be refrigerated and/or frozen and then used again?

Secondly....is it like other buttercreams and you have to cover the paddle to be able to get it bubble-free? If anyone happens to know about how many pounds of butter fit into a 6 qt bowl that would be awesome!!!! (I mean so I know how many recipes to make....if you can tell me how many lbs of butter you use for a full bowl.)

Thanks SO much!

45 replies
3GCakes Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:31pm
post #2 of 46

I make IMBC...I do refrigerate it and use it within a week or so, or I freeze it and use it in three or so months. You'll have to let it come back to room temp and re-whip.

I don't have problems with air bubbles. They are really not part of the equation with this type of icing, atleast not for me.

Are you going to use fresh eggs or pasteurized?

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:34pm
post #3 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes

I make IMBC...I do refrigerate it and use it within a week or so, or I freeze it and use it in three or so months. You'll have to let it come back to room temp and re-whip.

I don't have problems with air bubbles. They are really not part of the equation with this type of icing, atleast not for me.

Are you going to use fresh eggs or pasteurized?




I use regular eggs from Sams Club...I assume they are pasteurized....

So this icing is made with a whisk or paddle? I know its whisked before the butter is added, but I keep the whisk on even when adding butter? And there is no air whipped in, but stays creamy?

Sorry to ask such newbie questions!

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:38pm
post #4 of 46

I have used powdered egg whites with no problems, However, I can taste a difference when I have tried using meringue powder (I can detect a slight aftertaste, but my family can't taste a difference). I also have a 6quart Kitchen Aid and I use 6 sticks of butter, which fills it.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:40pm
post #5 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

I have used powdered egg whites with no problems, However, I can taste a difference when I have tried using meringue powder (I can detect a slight aftertaste, but my family can't taste a difference). I also have a 6quart Kitchen Aid and I use 6 sticks of butter, which fills it.




Why do you use powdered, do the real egg whites spoil? Do you have to order that?

Normita Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:43pm
post #6 of 46

Hi kita...

Yes the leftovers can be refigerated and I'm almost positive the icing can be freezed.

I have done a single recipe and have not had the paddle be completely covered and had not had an issue. And if it does have some slight bubbles....it can be easily taken care of with a hot spatula. And most of my cakes are covered in fondant anyway.

The most I was able to do in my KA was a double recipe, could not triple it. IDK why?? But I now have a 6 qt viking so I will try it out.

For a double recipe you need about 1.5 pounds of butter (6 sticks), so for triple recipe you need 9 sticks of butter which is a little over 2 pounds.

This recipe is awesome....so delish!! My favorite is berry smbc....pureed some strawberries and slowly poured that in little by little when the icing was finished...I then added some strawberry torani syrup....WOW was it good icon_smile.gif

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:43pm
post #7 of 46

No real eggs do not spoil, but the slightest amount of yolk can ruin the meringue. Also, I hate wasting the yolks. I never know what to do with them. However, yesterday someone posted a French Buttercream recipe that uses only yolks, so I may go back to using real egg whites now that I have a use for the yolks.

Normita Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:44pm
post #8 of 46
Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:46pm
post #9 of 46

I can't wait to try it! I haven't had time lately, do not want to use it on an order....but I have a cake show thingy I'm going to soon, so I think I'll ice my tasting cakes in it, if I like it (I'm sure I will!). My current non-crusting icing has a smooth consistency that customers really like, but I know how much butter and shortening go in it and its WAY WAY too much shortening for my taste (and for my tummy...bleh) so I think the meringue icing is gonna be the way I need to go. I will probably still use regular american buttercream under fondant, especially during the summer....

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:52pm
post #10 of 46

SMBC can get soft during the summer months. We were having this discussion last summer at the Wilton School, Collette Peters was teaching the class, she suggested adding a solid vegetable shortening (Crisco or Sweetex) to the SMBC and some powder sugar. She said that would help it stand up in the heat and humidity. She didn't give use exact amounts, she said "just play around with it". There has been times when I had a little regular buttercream and a little SMBC left over, so I have mixed the two of them together. That was very yummy.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:59pm
post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

SMBC can get soft during the summer months. We were having this discussion last summer at the Wilton School, Collette Peters was teaching the class, she suggested adding a solid vegetable shortening (Crisco or Sweetex) to the SMBC and some powder sugar. She said that would help it stand up in the heat and humidity. She didn't give use exact amounts, she said "just play around with it". There has been times when I had a little regular buttercream and a little SMBC left over, so I have mixed the two of them together. That was very yummy.




I find that my current non-crusting icing, which hardens up great in the fridge, tends to get too soft and bulgy under fondant for my taste when working at room temp on a cake. Not super terrible, but not as smooth and flawless as the regular American buttercream. But I much prefer a non crusting icing for buttercream wedding cakes.

As a side note...if you use two buttercreams...do you let your customers choose, or do you just use the one that works best with your cake flavors and that particular project? Or do you only just use one buttercream?

aswartzw Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 7:08pm
post #12 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

SMBC can get soft during the summer months. We were having this discussion last summer at the Wilton School, Collette Peters was teaching the class, she suggested adding a solid vegetable shortening (Crisco or Sweetex) to the SMBC and some powder sugar. She said that would help it stand up in the heat and humidity. She didn't give use exact amounts, she said "just play around with it". There has been times when I had a little regular buttercream and a little SMBC left over, so I have mixed the two of them together. That was very yummy.




Somebody on here uses Smart Balance during the summer and subs it in for the butter during the summer.

You don't need to worry about air bubbles. You do need to make sure everything is grease free or it will never come together.

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 7:08pm
post #13 of 46

My cakes are for friends and family, So they get whatever I have or feel like making unless they tell me specifically. I do make suggestions on what frosting works best with certain cakes. In my opinion, regular buttercream or a stiffer SMBC works best under fondant.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 7:20pm
post #14 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by aswartzw

Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

SMBC can get soft during the summer months. We were having this discussion last summer at the Wilton School, Collette Peters was teaching the class, she suggested adding a solid vegetable shortening (Crisco or Sweetex) to the SMBC and some powder sugar. She said that would help it stand up in the heat and humidity. She didn't give use exact amounts, she said "just play around with it". There has been times when I had a little regular buttercream and a little SMBC left over, so I have mixed the two of them together. That was very yummy.



Somebody on here uses Smart Balance during the summer and subs it in for the butter during the summer.

You don't need to worry about air bubbles. You do need to make sure everything is grease free or it will never come together.




Yeah I learned the hard way on that...I did a HUGE HUGE cake for someone in a s'more's theme for a fancy wedding. Swirled meringue (no butter, just meringue icing) then torched on site. I was doing it the day before because I did not know how long it would hold up. It was hot and humid...summer wedding. Some of my meringue held up pretty well but other batches did not whip up as stiffly as I wanted them to. I feel the entire cake was an absolute disaster (had to stack on site and everything) but they seemed fine with it...after all, a true "s'more" is sort of puffy and uneven...but I was internally mortified. Later I read about having tiny bits of yolk ruining the meringue and I realized in hindsight that I hadn't known about that and I had accidentally allowed some very small traces of yolk remain in the meringue. *sigh* Won't ever do that again.

aswartzw Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 7:25pm
post #15 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by aswartzw

Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

SMBC can get soft during the summer months. We were having this discussion last summer at the Wilton School, Collette Peters was teaching the class, she suggested adding a solid vegetable shortening (Crisco or Sweetex) to the SMBC and some powder sugar. She said that would help it stand up in the heat and humidity. She didn't give use exact amounts, she said "just play around with it". There has been times when I had a little regular buttercream and a little SMBC left over, so I have mixed the two of them together. That was very yummy.



Somebody on here uses Smart Balance during the summer and subs it in for the butter during the summer.

You don't need to worry about air bubbles. You do need to make sure everything is grease free or it will never come together.



Yeah I learned the hard way on that...I did a HUGE HUGE cake for someone in a s'more's theme for a fancy wedding. Swirled meringue (no butter, just meringue icing) then torched on site. I was doing it the day before because I did not know how long it would hold up. It was hot and humid...summer wedding. Some of my meringue held up pretty well but other batches did not whip up as stiffly as I wanted them to. I feel the entire cake was an absolute disaster (had to stack on site and everything) but they seemed fine with it...after all, a true "s'more" is sort of puffy and uneven...but I was internally mortified. Later I read about having tiny bits of yolk ruining the meringue and I realized in hindsight that I hadn't known about that and I had accidentally allowed some very small traces of yolk remain in the meringue. *sigh* Won't ever do that again.




LOL. It's fantastic when it comes out but it can be an absolute PAIN sometimes. I switched to IMBC because it is much easier and reliable.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 7:29pm
post #16 of 46

What IMBC recipe do you use? Is it similar in flavor and consistency?

Sangriacupcake Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:19pm
post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl


Later I read about having tiny bits of yolk ruining the meringue and I realized in hindsight that I hadn't known about that and I had accidentally allowed some very small traces of yolk remain in the meringue. *sigh* Won't ever do that again.




You have to be careful of any fat at all getting into the meringue....even a tiny amount on the beaters, bowl, scraper will affect the meringue. One time I was handling some sticks of butter (in their wrappers!) then cracked the eggs for the meringue....sure enough, the egg whites never whipped correctly!!! Now I swish some boiling water in my mixing bowl and over the beater attachment, whisk & scraper before making smbc. Some people use ever clear.

I just recently started having success with smbc. It does take some practice, but wow, is it worth it!!! Good luck icon_smile.gif

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:36pm
post #18 of 46

This is the recipe I use for IMBC, I have a 6 qt Kitchen Aid, and it fills it. I once tried doubling it and it was a huge mess, I'll never make that mistake again.
1/2 cup water
2 1/4 cup sugar
1 cup egg whites (I use 1/4+2T+2t of powder egg whites with 1 1/4 C of warm water)
6 sticks of soft unsalted butter
1t vanilla

Boil the water and sugar for 5 minutes on the stove, start the mixer (with whip attachment) with the egg whites and while the sugar mixture is boiling beat the egg whites for 2 minutes on high. After 2 minutes pour the sugar syrup slowly down the side of the mixing bowl (the mixer is still on high). When all the sugar syrup is add it should look thick and fluffy. Now change to the paddle attachment, put a towel over the bowl (this helps reduce the mess of splatter getting all over the place) and beat on high speed for about 10 minutes or until it is cool to the touch. Now add the butter. Add butter a few tablespoons at a time. If you think the meringue mixture is too warm, stop adding the butter and put the bowl and paddle into the fridge for a few minutes to cool. Then finish adding the butter. Add vanilla, and make sure you have scraped the sides of the bowl.

I have froze this, let it come to room temp and then remixed it. It is very tasty, not so sweet and very smooth.

Like I said in the an earlier post, I use powder egg whites because there is no chance of getting any of the yolk in the meringue. I have used both, real eggs and powder egg whites and I can't taste a difference. I have tried it using meringue powder and I can detect a slight after taste which I did not like. My family did not notice any difference when I used the meringue powder in place of powder egg whites.

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:39pm
post #19 of 46

OOPS, I left out an important item. Where it says egg whites, it should say 1/4 CUP + 2T+2t of powder egg whites

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:40pm
post #20 of 46

So the main difference is that in SMBC you cook the sugar with the eggs and in IMBC you only cook the sugar?

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:43pm
post #21 of 46

YUP, I can't taste any difference between the two. Just make sure if you are making SMBC that the sugar is all dissolved in the egg whites before you take if off the heat and start adding the butter. Otherwise it will be gritty. I have also used powdered egg whites for SMBC.

pmarks0 Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:57pm
post #22 of 46

The main difference between IMBC and SMBC is that with the IMBC you make a sugar syrup and pour that into the mixer when you're beating the egg whites. With SMBC you've combined the sugar and egg whites in a double boiler and whisk them over a simmer until the temperature is 160F and then put them into the mixer bowl (I put my KA bowl over a simmering pot of water) and use a whisk to beat them. When they reach the peaks you need, you switch to the paddle and add the softened butter. I haven't made IMBC because I like my SMBC (which is on this site). One thing, watch your quantities because one of the biggest complaints from people (us included) is that the taste is too buttery.

Check out this thread. FromScratchSF has done some great posts about SMBC and has her recipe in the thread as well. And she also has a tutorial on SMBC on her blog that I found really useful. One important thing she does say, and I totally agree with, is weigh your ingredients.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-711181-.html&sid=dd33504ff1a649ea88b2da8c4316f7e7

This is also a good thread.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-712173-.html&sid=d6564f2b9ff360cc7ed0b5128aef2058

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:03pm
post #23 of 46

So...is there a huge flavor difference in the two? IMBC does sound easier in a way...I dunno....

pmarks0 Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:07pm
post #24 of 46

I think overall the taste and silky texture is the same. I think there are fans of both methods. It's really which you prefer. I think I prefer the egg whites and sugar over the simmering water because I know the heat is killing anything in the raw eggs. It's said that the sugar syrup does the same when you pour it into the eggs whites during the beating stage.

I'm not sure you saw, but I edited my post above with the links.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:09pm
post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmarks0

I think overall the taste and silky texture is the same. I think there are fans of both methods. It's really which you prefer. I think I prefer the egg whites and sugar over the simmering water because I know the heat is killing anything in the raw eggs. It's said that the sugar syrup does the same when you pour it into the eggs whites during the beating stage.

I'm not sure you saw, but I edited my post above with the links.




Good point about the eggs...that kind of freaks me out too.

And it can be kept at room temp for several days, right?

I really appreciate all the info, sorry to start a new thread on it...

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:12pm
post #26 of 46

Using powdered egg whites will eliminate any fears of salmonella. I can buy them at my local grocery store, but www.fondantsource.com also sells it. I can't taste any difference between the two. I make both.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:13pm
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissfulbaker

Using powdered egg whites will eliminate any fears of salmonella. I can buy them at my local grocery store, but www.fondantsource.com also sells it. I can't taste any difference between the two. I make both.




What section do they sell it in, at the store? Sounds less wasteful than eggs....and safer.

pmarks0 Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 9:14pm
post #28 of 46

I've never kept mine long enough to know about storage (FromScratchSF probably knows) as I tend to make it the same day I need it. I do have some in the fridge right now from a few weeks ago (mainly because I had a little left and didn't want to throw it out LOL).

And I wouldn't worry about starting a new thread. Sometimes I think a new thread is better than adding to an older thread. I just know that when I read that three page thread I gave you I learned tons and I love that FromScratchSF has a blog. The info she gives is fantastic!

Good luck! I'm sure whichever you make will taste great.

blissfulbaker Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 10:08pm
post #29 of 46

In my local grocery store the powdered egg whites they are in the baking isle by the powdered buttermilk. www.fondantsource.com sells powdered egg whites too and it is cheaper than my local store.

3GCakes Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 10:48pm
post #30 of 46

I like to use the liquid egg whites in a carton. I prefer the Kroger Store brand, other brands don't work.

Here are some pics of the meringue I get with a whole carton of them.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-688611-.html

For me, it is easier to just have a carton on hand than to have to seperate the egg whites and yolks, and I don't make anything that I need a reserve of yolks for.

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