Have You Ever Been Burned?

Lounge By dldbrou Updated 4 Apr 2011 , 6:11pm by dchockeyguy

dldbrou Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 6:03pm
post #1 of 7

I was emailed this note and was wondering if anyone has ever tried this. I burn myself on my antique oven all the time and I think I will try this next time.



Once I was cooking some corn and stuck my fork in the boiling
water to see if the corn was ready. I missed and my hand went
into the boiling water....

A friend of mine, who was a Vietnam vet, came into the house, just
as I was screaming, and asked me if I had some plain old flour...I
pulled out a bag and he stuck my hand in it. He said to keep my hand
in the flour for 10 mins. which I did. He said that in Vietnam , this guy
was on fire and in their panic, they threw a bag of flour all over him to
put the fire out...well, it not only put the flour out, but he never even had
a blister!!!!

SOOOO, long story short, I put my hand in the bag of flour for 10 mins,
pulled it out and had not even a red mark or a blister and absolutley NO
PAIN. Now, I keep a bag of flour in the fridge and every time I burn myself,
I use the flour and never ONCE have I ever had a red spot, a burn or a blister!
*cold flour feels even better than room temperature flour.

Miracle, if you ask me. Keep a bag of white flour in your fridge and you will be
happy you did. I even burnt my tongue and put the flour on it for about 10 mins.
and the pain was gone and no burn. Try it! BTW, don't run your burn area under
Cold water first, just put it right into the flour for 10 mins and experience a miracle

6 replies
scp1127 Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 10:48pm
post #2 of 7

I burn myself all the time. Thanks for the tip.

By the way, I'm a Yorkie mom too! And she's a frosting fiend.

warchild Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 6:44pm
post #3 of 7

Received the same email. Flour cure for burns is FALSE.

http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/flourburns.asp

CWR41 Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 7:11pm
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by warchild

Received the same email. Flour cure for burns is FALSE.

http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/flourburns.asp




Thanks for an interesting read! It makes absolute sense that flour would hold in the heat.

I also enjoyed the stories about dust explosions. I've seen the results of way too many explosions from mechanical flour sifters (sometimes ignited by a spark, other times not). Having 8-16 ft. deep flour to clean up by the maintenance crew isn't a pretty sight!

warchild Posted 2 Apr 2011 , 8:33pm
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by warchild

Received the same email. Flour cure for burns is FALSE.

http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/flourburns.asp



Thanks for an interesting read! It makes absolute sense that flour would hold in the heat.

I also enjoyed the stories about dust explosions. I've seen the results of way too many explosions from mechanical flour sifters (sometimes ignited by a spark, other times not). Having 8-16 ft. deep flour to clean up by the maintenance crew isn't a pretty sight!




Yes, its unfortunate so much missinformation is out there. For burn treatment, and for so many other medical problems. I can't imagine anyone following the so called, miracle remedies we read and hear, without doing some research beforehand.

The dust explosions are something else. Have seen a few on my news over the years. Grain silos, sugar and flour refineries, large scale bakeries, mines are very susceptible to them. The finer the dust, the more explosive it is. So makes perfect sense throwing flour on a burning person or fire, would end up having a deadly effect.

Geez, I can't imagine having 8-16 feet deep flour to clean up! icon_eek.gif



Adding information from the Mayo Clinic on burn care for anyone that might be interested. Wouldn't hurt to print it out and keep on display since we bakers seem to be so burn prone!
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Burns: First aid
By Mayo Clinic staff

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Original Article:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/first-aid-burns/FA00022
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Mayo Clinic staff

To distinguish a minor burn from a serious burn, the first step is to determine the extent of damage to body tissues. The three burn classifications of first-degree burn, second-degree burn and third-degree burn will help you determine emergency care:

First-degree burn
The least serious burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin is burned, but not all the way through. The skin is usually red, with swelling, and pain sometimes is present. Treat a first-degree burn as a minor burn unless it involves substantial portions of the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or a major joint, which requires emergency medical attention.

Second-degree burn
When the first layer of skin has been burned through and the second layer of skin (dermis) also is burned, the injury is called a second-degree burn. Blisters develop and the skin takes on an intensely reddened, splotchy appearance. Second-degree burns produce severe pain and swelling.

If the second-degree burn is no larger than 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) in diameter, treat it as a minor burn. If the burned area is larger or if the burn is on the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or over a major joint, treat it as a major burn and get medical help immediately.

For minor burns, including first-degree burns and second-degree burns limited to an area no larger than 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) in diameter, take the following action:

■Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cool water or cool it with cold compresses. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don't put ice on the burn.
■Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Don't use fluffy cotton, or other material that may get lint in the wound. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin. Bandaging keeps air off the burn, reduces pain and protects blistered skin.
■Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns.
Minor burns usually heal without further treatment. They may heal with pigment changes, meaning the healed area may be a different color from the surrounding skin. Watch for signs of infection, such as increased pain, redness, fever, swelling or oozing. If infection develops, seek medical help. Avoid re-injuring or tanning if the burns are less than a year old doing so may cause more extensive pigmentation changes. Use sunscreen on the area for at least a year.

Caution

■Don't use ice. Putting ice directly on a burn can cause a burn victim's body to become too cold and cause further damage to the wound.
■Don't apply butter or ointments to the burn. This could cause infection.
■Don't break blisters. Broken blisters are more vulnerable to infection.
Third-degree burn
The most serious burns involve all layers of the skin and cause permanent tissue damage. Fat, muscle and even bone may be affected. Areas may be charred black or appear dry and white. Difficulty inhaling and exhaling, carbon monoxide poisoning, or other toxic effects may occur if smoke inhalation accompanies the burn.

For major burns, call 911 or emergency medical help. Until an emergency unit arrives, follow these steps:

Don't remove burned clothing. However, do make sure the victim is no longer in contact with smoldering materials or exposed to smoke or heat.
Don't immerse large severe burns in cold water. Doing so could cause a drop in body temperature (hypothermia) and deterioration of blood pressure and circulation (shock).
Check for signs of circulation (breathing, coughing or movement). If there is no breathing or other sign of circulation, begin CPR.
Elevate the burned body part or parts. Raise above heart level, when possible.
Cover the area of the burn. Use a cool, moist, sterile bandage; clean, moist cloth; or moist towels.
Get a tetanus shot. Burns are susceptible to tetanus. Doctors recommend you get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was more than five years ago, your doctor may recommend a tetanus shot booster.

linedancer Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 12:57am
post #6 of 7

For minor burns around the house, hitting the oven rack, hot glue, that sort of thing, use a tea bag. Just wet the bag and apply it to the burn. Or if it is a larger area, brew some strong tea and cool it with ice, then wet a rag and apply it to the burn. The tannin in the tea takes the pain away and it rarely leaves a blister. This is true, have used it for years...give it a try next time you hit your arm on the oven rack, or get a drop of hot glue on your finger.

dchockeyguy Posted 4 Apr 2011 , 6:11pm
post #7 of 7

I mostly burn myself on sugar! I'm still healing some blisters from last weekend assembling a sugar piece.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%