Help! A Teaching Birthday Party.... What Would You Do!?

Business By CiNoRi Updated 1 Apr 2011 , 6:27pm by CiNoRi

CiNoRi Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 3:36pm
post #1 of 9

Hi everyone,

I was just approached at local craft store by a mother looking for someone to come into her home And teach at her child's birthday party. The kids are huge fans of all the cake shows and she thought it would be fun to have something like this done.

I have never done anything like this so I'm not sure how to charge. There was mention of her baking the cakes and I come in with fondant and decoration stuff. There is also the possibility of me baking the cakes. Looking like a guest list of 18 kids. And what would you do for materials like rolling pins and things that I don't have multiples of?

The mom is supposed to call me this afternoon, I hope you all can help me plan this out a little.

Thanks!

8 replies
Dreme Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:10pm
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Woah Cinori, I just got the same request and was about to ask the same question. LOL. Im in NC too. Are you located in Raleigh?

cakesbycathy Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:14pm
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If you are providing everything (cakes or cupackes, frosting, decorating supplies) then a mininimum of $40 PER KID. If you are just showing up to teach then half that.

ddaigle Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:34pm
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I did this and charged $40 per kid. Next time, it will be $55. If I was traveling to someone's home--I'd charge $60 per kid. There is a ton of prep work.

I had 3 stations..cookies, cupcakes and cake (6" single). I'd eliminate the cookie station next time and just do 2 cupcakes: a cute fondant animal and a swirl with sprinkles.

The cake was a 6" single and already iced--they could care less about icing a cake and I knew it would look awful if they did it. I wanted them to have fun and have a presentable cake in the end. I chose the design--a jungle theme and provided each kid enough springles & sugars to decoarate their cake. Each child only had one deco bag--a paper parchment pre cut with the leaf tip and we showed them how to do a vertical, leaf type border and they stuck their animal sugars around the sides. They did the same on top.

They shared a (parchment) writer bag...they all wanted to write their name. I had all 3 stations done in 2 hours. You could do 2 in 1 1/2 so they are not rushed.

The key is to have everything ready and organized.

CiNoRi Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:56pm
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Dreme: I was! In the Michaels on Capital... weird

cownsj Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 5:02pm
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I did one for a friend, so I can't tell you about charging and thankfully it looks like you already have good advice there. For rolling pins, since they were only rolling small amounts of fondant for little cookie cutters, I gave them each a thick lollipop stick to use, and it worked perfectly for them. You could probably also use wooden dowels, but the thicker lollipop sticks worked just fine. We did just cupcakes. I also went to Walmart and bought some of their vinyl by the yard and cut it into mats. I divided the width by 3 and went 18" long, they were almost square. Plus I brought waxed paper for them to practice their piping skills on first. Next time I would make, I think they're called Icing Bullets to use. Instead of having to refill the piping bags, you have icing that's been rolled in plastic wrap that you freeze ahead of time. When their bag is empty just cut the end off the bullet, drop into the bag and when it's empty pull out the remainder of the plastic and drop in a new one. I haven't done it yet, but a friend told me it works like a charm and it saves time. That was where most of my time was consumed, refilling bags for 9 year olds. I let my friend have all the cupcakes baked and ready for when I got there. I had a ball right along with the kids.

CiNoRi Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 5:12pm
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The more I thought about it I was considering teaching a specific thing like they making a mini purse cake... Ideally I'd show up with blocks of cake
pre-iced and Each person decorating materials organized. Yeah my goal is the to keep it simple it's possible!

lorieleann Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 6:18pm
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if you want to do a teaching party and not just a demonstration, the Wilton site has a nice syllabus geared for a Girl Scout badge. It is three hours, but you can cut it down and use it as a starting point. 18 is a huge decorating party if they are going to be hands on along with you. I did one for 11 girls and it was a good size.

CiNoRi Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 6:27pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann

if you want to do a teaching party and not just a demonstration, the Wilton site has a nice syllabus geared for a Girl Scout badge. It is three hours, but you can cut it down and use it as a starting point. 18 is a huge decorating party if they are going to be hands on along with you. I did one for 11 girls and it was a good size.





Cool ideal, thanky. Yeah we talked about splitting the group... but that might be harder, the kids and myself would feel rushed. Will have to see icon_wink.gif

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