How To Paint A Design On Fondant If U Aren't A Good Artist?

Decorating By usmdesigner Updated 1 Apr 2011 , 5:40pm by luddroth

usmdesigner Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 12:45pm
post #1 of 13

I'm wanting to paint the starbucks logo on some fondant but know that I'm not a good artist at all. (the black and white portion of the girl inside the green circle)

Can anyone give suggestions of how I would do be able to do this without buying one of those printers that do the edible paper?

I thought of printing out the logo and then trying to "trace" out lines with a pointed shaper tool, but my paper is really thick. I also thought about getting some parchment paper and trace to it and then try that same idea with the pointed tool, but I'm not sure if that will work either.

Any suggestions?

12 replies
pbhobby Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 12:51pm
post #2 of 13

I've used parchment paper with some luck before but with a design that detailed it's not easy. I'm curious to see what other will suggest.

online_annie Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 12:55pm
post #3 of 13

I think a lot of people use an edible image. You can take a copy of the logo and have one printed up. They work great on fondant as well as buttercream. It might be worth your while to check it out. They can print multiple images so you can try it on a scrap piece of fondant before using it on the real deal. That's my suggestion. Let's us know how it turns out!

mmmmmmmmcake1954 Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 1:19pm
post #4 of 13

Trace the design onto parchment paper, then using a non-toxic pencil retrace on the other side of the parchment and place this side down on top of the cake, then retrace the first side, you should get a very light outline which will give you something to work with - but make sure that you use non toxic pencil. The you can use dust colours mixed with clear alcohol or cocoa butter to paint your design. HTH thumbs_up.gif

usmdesigner Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 3:43pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmmmmmmcake1954

Trace the design onto parchment paper, then using a non-toxic pencil retrace on the other side of the parchment and place this side down on top of the cake, then retrace the first side, you should get a very light outline which will give you something to work with - but make sure that you use non toxic pencil. The you can use dust colours mixed with clear alcohol or cocoa butter to paint your design. HTH thumbs_up.gif




I had actually thought of this (but was thinking to paint it and not use a nontox pencil). Of course when I thought of it with paint, that way seemed like it would be filled with errors from me placing it and then get smearing.

Your idea seems much better though. Any idea where to get the nontox pencel from? Walmart? Hobby Lobby? Micheals?

luddroth Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:02pm
post #6 of 13

Regular No. 2 pencil lead is soft enough to work that way and it's not lead, it's graphite. The infinitessimal amount that would be transferred would be harmless, and probably removed in the painting process anyway. I wouldn't worry about it. But if you are, then you could do the whole thing on a separate fondant or gumpaste plaque, that would be removed before serving.

quietude Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:05pm
post #7 of 13

You could also use a light food color marker as well to trace out your image prior to painting. I use the Americolor brand and this has been very helpful for me.

ChefAngie Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:10pm
post #8 of 13

Roll your fondant thin enough to see the logo thru it and use the food writers to draw and color it or use an air brush to draw and color in picture- this is what I do. Hope this helps.
Happy Baking and Decorating,
Chef Angie

imagenthatnj Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 4:18pm
post #9 of 13




You could also paint on rice paper.

usmdesigner Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 5:18pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

Regular No. 2 pencil lead is soft enough to work that way and it's not lead, it's graphite. The infinitessimal amount that would be transferred would be harmless, and probably removed in the painting process anyway. I wouldn't worry about it. But if you are, then you could do the whole thing on a separate fondant or gumpaste plaque, that would be removed before serving.




This seems reasonable enough to me. I've never had anyone go off and grab fondant extras and eat them. There just isn't any real incentive to do so. There is like, 1 person that rarely does fondant cakes in our city. Hardly anyone knows what it is.

I would most likely asked them to just remove that before cutting it anyway.

I'm going to play with some ideas over the weekend to see how it all works out though, and if all else fails (or I can't find a nontox pencil) then I'll go with this one

mamabaer Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 5:39pm
post #12 of 13

I print out the actual logo the size that I want it and then cut out the various pieces with scissors. then I lay them on the fondant and either trace with an edible marker then fill in with food color, or I trace lightly with my exacto knife then fill in with paint. If you see my lego star wars cake and my sweethearts candy box cake, this is what I did.

luddroth Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 5:40pm
post #13 of 13

Nice work, imaginethatnj! You did the research to confirm my not-very-authoritative point! Thanks.

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