Question For Those In Florida

Business By dst10spr97 Updated 10 Apr 2011 , 9:48pm by homebasedbaking

dst10spr97 Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 11:35am
post #1 of 9

I'm trying to understand all the legalese in terms of being able to sell custom cakes in the state of Florida. When renting a commercial kitchen I understand you have to list them on your liability insurance. But is the only other thing you'll need to be able to sell cakes/cupcakes is a food handlers permit or whatever its legally called? Just trying to make sure I have all the information I need to do this legally, especially if I decide to do wedding cakes as I understand some facilities require you to be licensed. Still have my fingers crossed that the Cottage Food Law passes! icon_biggrin.gif

Basically I need to know, what legal steps I need to take if renting a kitchen?

What steps do I need to take if I decide to build on a commercial facility at home?

What type of additional licensing I'll need if any, once the Cottage Food Act passes?

Wasn't there a link for Florida on one of these threads?

8 replies
linedancer Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 12:40pm
post #2 of 9

Can't answer your questions, but here is a link to one of the threads concerning the Florida cottage act. It looks like it is scheduled for a second reading, but don't know the date of that. PM Barbara, KrazyaboutCake on this forum. She might be able to help you.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=712309&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

dst10spr97 Posted 1 Apr 2011 , 3:31pm
post #3 of 9

I've been following that thread. But I was just wondering about my other options as well. Thank you.

emilyc262 Posted 3 Apr 2011 , 4:23pm
post #4 of 9

This is what I have found so far after checking out 2 commerical kitchens in FL: I would need the Dept. of Agriculture to inspect the kitchen and within 90 days take the food safety course. 1 kitchen required liability, 1 did not. You also need a county and city permit but, again, 1 kitchen required it, one did not (but to be really legal you need those). My understanding is you can't have a commercial kitchen at your residence. Maybe if it was a completely seperate building and you are zoned for both business and residential? Let's hope the Cottage Law goes thru. No licensing at all. Just follow the rules and be willing to be inspected if they ask.

TPACakeGirl Posted 7 Apr 2011 , 6:21pm
post #5 of 9

So you know, the Cottage Food Act in Florida has past it's 3rd reading. I think it's going to the governor now for approval. If it passes, we will be able to bake from home effective July 1st.

dst10spr97 Posted 8 Apr 2011 , 3:37am
post #6 of 9

I was just coming online to follow up on it. So that means all I'll need is my business license, no inspections?! Would I need a food permit of any kind? Wait I think someone answered this for me in another thread, let me go look again.

jhay Posted 10 Apr 2011 , 6:44pm
post #7 of 9

From what I understand, you won't even need a license. Though, I don't know how the state will be able to keep track of all of us if we aren't registered somehow.


Any thoughts?

jason_kraft Posted 10 Apr 2011 , 7:20pm
post #8 of 9

The FL cottage food bill requires printing your name and address on the label of anything you sell, and the state reserves the right to inspect your facility if there are complaints about your product. The bill also specifically says that cottage food operations are still subject to county and municipal ordinances (i.e. zoning), so you would still need to make sure you are not violating zoning laws in your town.

There would be no permits required from the state, only county/municipal permits or licenses would be required.

homebasedbaking Posted 10 Apr 2011 , 9:48pm
post #9 of 9

You asked:

Basically I need to know, what legal steps I need to take if renting a kitchen? The most practical way to locate this information is to contact the regulatory agency that licensed the commercial kitchen you want to rent; they can provide that information along with any additional rules and regs.

What steps do I need to take if I decide to build on a commercial facility at home?
A commercial kitchen is totally separate from your own home meals.
Contact your county Board of Health and ask for the regulations of commercial kitchens, they usually have a brochure that states all the requirements.
You have to buy equipment that is approved by your county, if you buy a new piece, you must let them know, and they do inspections on a regular basis which you pay for.
All equipment must be labeled NSF, all of it, even baking and cooking utensils. All this information will be provided however.

What type of additional licensing I'll need if any, once the Cottage Food Act passes?
No one can answer this since the Act has not passed and until the legislation is signed into law, chances in the bill may occur.

Wasn't there a link for Florida on one of these threads?
If you want a draft (pdf) of the legislation, just let me know. it really is too long to post here.

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