Stacking Cake Preference?

Decorating By KMKakes Updated 31 Mar 2011 , 3:03pm by KMKakes

KMKakes Posted 30 Mar 2011 , 2:07pm
post #1 of 7

I always have the most trying time stacking 2 cakes. I have read different threads about using different tools to stack them, but tried them it doesn't work very well without sliding on the buttercream icing of the other cake. Is there a trick of the trade that I am missing out on? Is it better with fondant covered cakes? (I purchased the wilton cake lifter and even used a spatula along with that.) Help, all tips welcomed.

6 replies
CWR41 Posted 30 Mar 2011 , 2:48pm
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by KMKakes

I have read different threads about using different tools to stack them, but tried them it doesn't work very well without sliding on the buttercream icing of the other cake.




I don't know what tools you've tried that didn't work, but no special tools are required other than the same spatula that you use to ice the cake with.

Your upper cake (on its own board) can't slide on the buttercream of the cake below if it isn't directly touching it. (If using single-plate separators, it touches the plate. If not using plates, it touches the cardboard above the support system.)

Perhaps this thread will help:
"Any tips for stacking? Fingers/spatula in the way"
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-710889-doubling.html
(hope it answers your question.)

KarolynAndrea Posted 30 Mar 2011 , 3:37pm
post #3 of 7

Sugarshack has a great DVD called Successful Stacking. I highly recommend it! Google "SugarEd Productions" to get the site. icon_smile.gif

KMKakes Posted 31 Mar 2011 , 1:54pm
post #4 of 7

@CWR41:

Quote:
Quote:

Your upper cake (on its own board) can't slide on the buttercream of the cake below if it isn't directly touching it. (If using single-plate separators, it touches the plate. If not using plates, it touches the cardboard above the support system.)


So the top cake is not suppose to touch (rest upon) the bottom tier? I was taught at a Wilton "tall cake" class, to use the wooden dowel rods cut and marked just at the top of the icing of the bottom cake. Once the top tier is set upon the bottom there should not be any space between the two cakes (between the top cake and its board and the bottom cake), yet often all sides will be level except one even if I torte and use a level to make sure it is leveled out. Besides that (the main issue), I can't keep the cake from sliding out of my hands to not dent the bottom cake or to sit in the bottom position without needing to slide it over once it has touched the cake in another area. I am afraid that if there is space between the two cakes, for example a 6 inch and a 8inch, the top cake will be too wobbly and risk falling. icon_cry.gif [/quote]

KMKakes Posted 31 Mar 2011 , 1:55pm
post #5 of 7

@KarolynAndrea: Thanks, I'll have to check into that.

CWR41 Posted 31 Mar 2011 , 2:51pm
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by KMKakes

So the top cake is not suppose to touch (rest upon) the bottom tier? I was taught at a Wilton "tall cake" class, to use the wooden dowel rods cut and marked just at the top of the icing of the bottom cake. Once the top tier is set upon the bottom there should not be any space between the two cakes (between the top cake and its board and the bottom cake), yet often all sides will be level except one even if I torte and use a level to make sure it is leveled out. Besides that (the main issue), I can't keep the cake from sliding out of my hands to not dent the bottom cake or to sit in the bottom position without needing to slide it over once it has touched the cake in another area. I am afraid that if there is space between the two cakes, for example a 6 inch and a 8inch, the top cake will be too wobbly and risk falling. icon_cry.gif




I didn't say anything about leaving a space or that the top cake is not suppose to touch the bottom tier. If you read the link provided, I mention avoiding dropping/sliding it directly on the BC surface--use another circle (this also solves your issue of denting the bottom cake):
"One hand on the spatula and one hand underneath the cake (on its own cake circle) supporting the weight.

If you're using SPS, you can lower one side of the tier onto the plate, remove your hand, slide the tier into place across the plate with your spatula, lower the cake the rest of the way, and remove your spatula.

If you aren't using SPS, it helps with positioning if you're placing your tier onto another cake circle (just as you would with a single plate separator). So rather than trying to lower it on top of a buttercream surface (while denting the lower cake, trying to get your hand and spatula out without making a mess, and possibly disturbing the dowels), you're lowering it onto a corrugated cake circle instead that's already stuck in place on the surface of the lower tier. Doubling up on circles is easier than risking damage and causing internal support issues, and you'll still be able to hammer a center dowel through all tiers without a problem."

KMKakes Posted 31 Mar 2011 , 3:03pm
post #7 of 7

I found Indydebi's blog about it. The "marring" she has on the bottom tier of cake was what I was referring to but mine was a little more larger and away from the top cake. I'll have to give her technique a try!

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