Making A Building?

Decorating By KarenOR Updated 24 Mar 2011 , 4:14pm by KarenOR

KarenOR Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:23am
post #1 of 12

I'm getting ready to do Nate's Sesame Street cake and I've decided to actually recreate the main building at 123 Sesame Street. I have never done anything that had to be so precise. Helpful hints?
I was planning on doing fondant unless there is a really compelling reason not to. Will it be too hard to get good corners? Do I need to use something like pastillage and do all the panels ahead of time? I would actally kind of like that, but then how do I get them on ? Royal? Is it easy to make pastillage?
Any help appreciated!
Thanks.

11 replies
cakesrock Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:30am
post #2 of 12

I think fondant would be your best bet. Use ganache instead of BC to get sharper corners.
http://www.artandappetite.com/2009/11/ganache-instead-of-buttercream/

Kitagrl Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:32am
post #3 of 12

You can just make panels out of fondant mixed with a little gumpaste, you would not need to use something so hard as pastillage. Then just stick them on the buttercream iced cake and seal the edges with a matching color of royal icing, and rub smooth with your finger. Good luck!

KarenOR Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:45am
post #4 of 12

Do you think the fondant/gumpaste would retain its shape enough to get it on the cake without total distortion ? I would love to be able to lay out all the windows and everything and then pop up the panels when the cake is done. That would be fabulous. I just didn't know if it would work.

I only make 2 cakes a year, one for each kid, so I don't cover a lot of ground icon_smile.gif

Thanks.

KarenOR Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:51am
post #5 of 12

Suzy, your cakes are amazing!

Kitagrl Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:51am
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenOR

Do you think the fondant/gumpaste would retain its shape enough to get it on the cake without total distortion ? I would love to be able to lay out all the windows and everything and then pop up the panels when the cake is done. That would be fabulous. I just didn't know if it would work.

I only make 2 cakes a year, one for each kid, so I don't cover a lot of ground icon_smile.gif

Thanks.




If you have time to make them ahead of time and let them dry on wax paper or preferably a silicone mat, that would work best! Here are three cakes I have done that used the "dry-a-sheet-of-fondant-ahead-of-time" method:

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1742787

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1696922

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1660099

Kitagrl Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:52am
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenOR

Suzy, your cakes are amazing!




Aw thanks. icon_smile.gif

KarenOR Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 2:56am
post #8 of 12

Oh I have loads of time. I plan it that way! The party isn't until April 16th. I usually need at least a month, working on the weekends to get things done.

It's fun to look at people's cakes. I grew up in PA.

KarenOR Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 3:11pm
post #9 of 12

So, should it be straight fondant, or a gumpaste mixture?

cakesrock Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 3:15pm
post #10 of 12

I'd use fondant with a bit of tylose or gumtex powder. Easier to use than gumpaste.

Kitagrl Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 3:31pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesrock

I'd use fondant with a bit of tylose or gumtex powder. Easier to use than gumpaste.




I agree, with tylose...except if you don't have tylose, gumpaste mixed with your fondant (maybe a 1/4-1/3 ratio) will do the same thing.

KarenOR Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 4:14pm
post #12 of 12

Great! Thanks!
I think I know what I'll be doing this weekend.

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