Can I Put A Cake Sealant On Warm Cake?

Decorating By bcarb Updated 24 Mar 2011 , 5:20pm by bcarb

bcarb Posted 22 Mar 2011 , 8:32pm
post #1 of 15

When do I put the cake sealer on. Can I put on the cake when still warm? Has anyone ever tried a sealer of one to one raspberry jam and water?
thanks ahead of time.

14 replies
DeniseNH Posted 22 Mar 2011 , 11:05pm
post #2 of 15

I don't know but the warmer the cake the more likely that the jam would sink into the cake and disappear on you.

sugardugar Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 1:05am
post #3 of 15

No, you really can't, it will melt into your cake.

Shelley51708 Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 1:17am
post #4 of 15

Stupid question....what's a cake sealer???

bcarb Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 1:32am
post #5 of 15

Thanks everyone for the responses. That makes sense that it would melt into the cake and then in part defeat its purpose. I really appreciate everyone taking their time to answer my questions.

Shelley51708, I'm just learning, but I think a sealant is used to seal in the moisture of a cake and to crumb coat.

cakegirl1973 Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 1:33am
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelley51708

Stupid question....what's a cake sealer???




Not a stupid question--I've never heard of it either, and I'd love to know, too!

Shelley51708 Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 5:24pm
post #7 of 15

"I'm just learning, but I think a sealant is used to seal in the moisture of a cake and to crumb coat"

What do you use for a sealant?

bcarb Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 8:16pm
post #8 of 15

Shelley51708, I had never used it before yesterday. I used 1:1 ratio of water to raspberry preserves. I heated the water, then mixed in the preserves, then strained the seeds out. I ended up with a sticky red syrup that I managed to get all over my kitchen. I then brushed onto cake. I could hardly taste, but people did say my cake was very moist, so not sure if that was the reason or if it was because I served it the day I made it.

I've read people use apricot preserves and someone had posted on a thread previously, this recipe. I have not tried it, though.

1 2/3 cup confectioners sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon flavoring
about 1/4 cup water

Hope this helps.

kakeladi Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 10:55pm
post #9 of 15

What she is referring to is 'crumb coat' OR 'dirty icing'.
It sounds like she is in the UK or similar location since she mentions using jams - raspberry or apricot. That is what is used on fruit cakes in the UK.

bcarb Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 3:29am
post #10 of 15

LOL No, I'm not from the UK.
Yes I am using it to crumb coat, sealer to make for a moist cake, and to have something for my ganache to stick to. I'm told it enhanced the flavor of my ganache, too.
Boy, I would like to try one of your fruit cakes, though. Sounds very good.

Sweetcakes23 Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 4:21am
post #11 of 15

Could you be talking about the Simple syrup coating/sealer? I use that and it does keep my cakes very moist.
Recipe:

1 cup granulated suger
1 cup water
In small saucepan, heat mixture to boiling, stirring only once at beginning, to get the sugar disolved. (Use wooden/plastic spoon).
Once boiling, let boil 1 min.
Remove from heat, let cool.

I store this in plastic squeeze bottles in Refrigerator. I squirt it on my cakes evenly then wrap them in plastic.
Recipe may be doubled.

cakegirl1973 Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 4:36am
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetcakes23

Could you be talking about the Simple syrup coating/sealer? I use that and it does keep my cakes very moist.
I store this in plastic squeeze bottles in Refrigerator. I squirt it on my cakes evenly then wrap them in plastic.
Recipe may be doubled.




How much do you squirt on your cake? Do you just squirt the tops or the sides, too? I've been afraid to try a simple syrup because I tend to be heavy handed.

Sweetcakes23 Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 4:50am
post #13 of 15

You CAN just use a pastry brush to pat/spread it on. It should go on lightly. I have just gotten used to putting "the right amount" on and have now switched to using the squirt bottles.
I would say...Just squirt in zig zags in both directions. Once I see most of the top is "lightly" covered, that's good!
You will know if you wet it too much, it WILL get the cake soggy if you're too heavy handed.

cakegirl1973 Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 5:42am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetcakes23

You CAN just use a pastry brush to pat/spread it on. It should go on lightly. I have just gotten used to putting "the right amount" on and have now switched to using the squirt bottles.
I would say...Just squirt in zig zags in both directions. Once I see most of the top is "lightly" covered, that's good!
You will know if you wet it too much, it WILL get the cake soggy if you're too heavy handed.




Thanks so much! I will have to try this on a few practice cakes.

bcarb Posted 24 Mar 2011 , 5:20pm
post #15 of 15

Thanks Sweetcakes23. I'm going to try your version next. Using a silicon pastry brush worked well for me with my raspberry version. Do you ever add flavorings or preserves in yours for a little added taste? I suppose it wouldn't last as long in the frig with the extras added, though.

I was looking for a squeeze bottle and when I found it at Walmart, I couldn't remember why I wanted it! You just reminded me on why. icon_smile.gif

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