Lumpy Ganache

Baking By chefjennalee Updated 24 Aug 2011 , 3:37pm by artscallion

chefjennalee Posted 17 Mar 2011 , 4:32pm
post #1 of 15

I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I've been using the same ganache recipe forever but now every time I make it it gets lumpy! I've tried heating it in the microwave after making it to get the lumps out but its no working. What am I doing wrong?!? I have 2 cake orders coming up that are ganache cakes and I can't have them looking like this.

HELP!

14 replies
Cupcations Posted 17 Mar 2011 , 4:37pm
post #2 of 15

The best thing to do when making Ganache is to add the whipping cream in small portions

The last time I made ganache it started to get lumpy, but I think I put too much whipping cream at a time, I started to whisk it very fast & thank goodness they all went away.
Sorry not much help but you can try whisking it while still hot icon_rolleyes.gif

HTH

splymale Posted 18 Mar 2011 , 5:31pm
post #3 of 15

I would try it in a double boiler, gives you more control than in a microwave & you can stir it constantly.

gbbaker Posted 18 Mar 2011 , 5:42pm
post #4 of 15

If you have a food processor use that , chop your chocolate add pulse it in the food processor till small bits. If you don't have a food processor chop into very small pieces , add your cream that you boiled and pour over the chocolate and cover tightly with plastic wrap and let sit one minute,then whisk. I have been a pasty chef for 20 years and a food processor is my first choice,(pour the boiling cream over the fine chocolate).

Marianna46 Posted 18 Mar 2011 , 5:45pm
post #5 of 15

I also do my ganache in the microwave, but if I were having trouble, I'd switch to the double boiler for awhile, too. If the lumps aren't going away when you reheat it, I'd say your chocolate has seized up, something which can happen either when it gets overheated at some point or when water gets into it (I suppose these are two different kinds of seizing, but the end result is the same - you can't use that chocolate anymore). I hope this is not the case, but if it is, use your ganache to make hot chocolate with and start over. Unfortunately, it's the only way.

artscallion Posted 18 Mar 2011 , 5:46pm
post #6 of 15

You're not using chocolate chips by any chance?

lrlt2000 Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 2:31am
post #7 of 15

Had to "bump" this, as I need an answer to the same question but using white chocolate chips!

artscallion: why do you ask about "chips"? I've made white chocolate ganache with melting chocolate ("candy" chocolate) and not had lump problems. But the last two times, I've used chips and had this problem!

What is it and is it ruined?

artscallion Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 10:59am
post #8 of 15

chocolate chips contain less cocoa butter than baking chocolate because they are designed to hold their shape. This makes them more difficult to work with when melted and they are more likely to reform limps.

lrlt2000 Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 12:10pm
post #9 of 15

Even with white chocolate? I didn't think it contained any real cocoa. But I'm glad you told me: I've never done regular chocolate ganache, but when I do, I'll be sure not to use chips. What do you use, blocks, baker's chips, bars? Thanks!

artscallion Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 1:10pm
post #10 of 15

White chocolate does contain cocoa butter. It' cocoa solids that it does not contain. That is why it is technically not considered chocolate. And, past that, you have to pay attention to the label with white chocolate if you're going to use it for anything. Make sure you get "white chocolate chips" not, "white baking chips", which are closer to WIlton candy melts.

When I make ganache, I generally use block chocolate that has the percentage right on the label. I never use chips. And I only use bars if I need a fast ganache and I can't get to the market that sells blocks. And when I say blocks, I don't mean the baking squares, I mean giant blocks that are chopped into hunks you can buy. They're sold by weight and list the cocoa fat percentage right on the label)

lrlt2000 Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 1:54pm
post #11 of 15

Ahhhhh, thanks for the education. So, is it because there's not enough moisture/oils to melt the chips into the cream well?? Should I add more cream and re-warm? I should clarify: I'm using ganache only as the layer under fondant, to get sharp edges and a nice flat finish. So, I like a 4:1 ratio because it sets up firmly.

Given this, what should I look for on the label if I buy in blocks? I have seen this at our local gourmet shop, but for the amount I need to cover a cake (two layers), it's kind of expensive. Or can I stick with cheaper chips or candy melts for this purpose??

Thanks.

artscallion Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 2:11pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrlt2000

Ahhhhh, thanks for the education. So, is it because there's not enough moisture/oils to melt the chips into the cream well?? Should I add more cream and re-warm? I should clarify: I'm using ganache only as the layer under fondant, to get sharp edges and a nice flat finish. So, I like a 4:1 ratio because it sets up firmly.

Given this, what should I look for on the label if I buy in blocks? I have seen this at our local gourmet shop, but for the amount I need to cover a cake (two layers), it's kind of expensive. Or can I stick with cheaper chips or candy melts for this purpose??

Thanks.




for white choc I usually use a 3:1 ratio and it firms up fine (using real white chocolate.)
I should clarify, the percentages listed on the blocks are for the cocoa liquer content (derived from the solids), not the fat. So they are more of an indicator of the intensity of the chocolate flavor. There are minimum standards for this for each type of chocolate. The commercial bars you find in the market are usually close to the minimum percentage. The blocks you find at the gourmet store are usually varying degrees higher than the minimum, and thus considered more flavorful and better quality.

lrlt2000 Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 3:18pm
post #13 of 15

I have tried 3:1 and found it was too soft for sharp edges under fondant. Do you think it matters what the chocolate's quality of flavor is for this purpose? I don't know what effect flavor/quality would have on firming characteristics, so excuse my ignorance icon_razz.gif

carmijok Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 3:29pm
post #14 of 15

I use chips all the time and never have lumping problems. My recipe is 1 1/2 cups whipping cream, a 12 ounce package of chocolate chips (Nestle toll house is what I use) and 3 TBL of butter. I heat the whipped cream to scalding, take off the heat, add the chips, stir til melted then whisk in the butter. This makes an awesome ganache that you can whip or use as is.

If your ganache is lumping could it be getting a drop of water from somewhere? That could certainly make it seize.

artscallion Posted 24 Aug 2011 , 3:37pm
post #15 of 15

The flavor/quality will not really have an effect on firming. As to whether or not it is worth the expense for the flavor/quality, that would depend on how refined the palate of the customer is. For a kids party it wouldn't matter. I would use candy melts. For your average adult party, I'd use regular market bars. If you cater to a higher end clientele that would be used to a better quality of chocolate and might notice the diff, I would go with the higher quality gourmet store stuff.

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