Measuring Flour With A Scale Vs A Measuring Cup

Baking By paigereese Updated 15 Mar 2011 , 4:09am by FromScratchSF

paigereese Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 2:29pm
post #1 of 12

Hi there:

Is there an easy way to figure out how to translate cups to ounces when measuring dry ingredients... I have realzied that using a scale is much more accurate especailly when measuring flour, however, most recipes that i have are in cups... (example: if a recipes calls for 2 1/2 cups of flour, how do you measure that in ounces on a scale becuase it is a solid and not a liquid.) Thanks very much.

11 replies
Tea42 Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 2:46pm
post #2 of 12

I get a lot of my conversions here:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/IngredientSubstitution.html

There has to be a better source for getting all the ingredient changes but I don't know where/what it is.

Tea42 Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 2:47pm
post #3 of 12

I get a lot of my conversions here:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/IngredientSubstitution.html

There has to be a better source for getting all the ingredient changes but I don't know where/what it is.

jmt1714 Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 3:15pm
post #4 of 12

next time you make the recipe per normal, why not weigh the ingredients as you add them and record it in your cookbook?

flamingobaker Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 3:18pm
post #5 of 12

Because flour and weather can vary, I measured out one cup of flour 2 or 3 times and averaged it out. I use 130gm - 135 gm and check it a couple of times a year.

I also do the same sugar and shortening (200gm & 191gm) but they don't seem to vary for me.

DDiva Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 3:19pm
post #6 of 12

You'll never find a complete chart of ingredient weights because so much of what you use is unique to you. What I did, and what I teach in my class, is to create your own chart. Once you know the weight of an item, for example--one cup of flour weighs 4 ounces, then break that down from 1/4 through one cup. Do that for all ingredients that you use on a regular basis. I keep my chart in a sheet protector and it's posted on a bulletin board in my kitchen. That way when I need to determine a weight I can just turn around and glance at the chart. If I need 2-1/2 cups of flour, I can easily see that it'll be 10 ounces. Also, when you determine the weight of an item in a recipe, jot it next to the item on the recipe card (or sheet). Saves a bunch of time!! Oh, I created my chart in EXcel, that way I can add to it as needed. HTH

infinitsky Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 3:36pm
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDiva

You'll never find a complete chart of ingredient weights because so much of what you use is unique to you. What I did, and what I teach in my class, is to create your own chart. Once you know the weight of an item, for example--one cup of flour weighs 4 ounces, then break that down from 1/4 through one cup. Do that for all ingredients that you use on a regular basis. I keep my chart in a sheet protector and it's posted on a bulletin board in my kitchen. That way when I need to determine a weight I can just turn around and glance at the chart. If I need 2-1/2 cups of flour, I can easily see that it'll be 10 ounces. Also, when you determine the weight of an item in a recipe, jot it next to the item on the recipe card (or sheet). Saves a bunch of time!! Oh, I created my chart in EXcel, that way I can add to it as needed. HTH




Ditto! thumbs_up.gif

I did the exact same thing, with the difference that I use grams (UK metric measurments) not ounces just because it is easier for me.

KATHIESKREATIONS Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 7:58pm
post #8 of 12

Great ideas! thumbs_up.gif I came across this site with so much information & LOVE it for conversions of many types. You can put in exactly what you want & it does everything for you. It is traditional oven .com icon_smile.gif

artscallion Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 8:22pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by KATHIESKREATIONS

...I came across this site...It is traditional oven .com




Hmmm...that address brings me to a site on how to build a wood burning stove.

dchockeyguy Posted 14 Mar 2011 , 9:48pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitsky

Quote:
Originally Posted by DDiva

You'll never find a complete chart of ingredient weights because so much of what you use is unique to you. What I did, and what I teach in my class, is to create your own chart. Once you know the weight of an item, for example--one cup of flour weighs 4 ounces, then break that down from 1/4 through one cup. Do that for all ingredients that you use on a regular basis. I keep my chart in a sheet protector and it's posted on a bulletin board in my kitchen. That way when I need to determine a weight I can just turn around and glance at the chart. If I need 2-1/2 cups of flour, I can easily see that it'll be 10 ounces. Also, when you determine the weight of an item in a recipe, jot it next to the item on the recipe card (or sheet). Saves a bunch of time!! Oh, I created my chart in EXcel, that way I can add to it as needed. HTH



Ditto! thumbs_up.gif

I did the exact same thing, with the difference that I use grams (UK metric measurments) not ounces just because it is easier for me.




Not only that, but grams are more accurate because it's a smaller unit of measure.

saffronica Posted 15 Mar 2011 , 1:23am
post #11 of 12

You may find a conversion chart that you like, but I'd still recommend measuring (with cups) and weighing it a couple of times. The weight of a cup of flour, for example, can vary widely depending on the way you measure it -- scooping and leveling, dip and sweep, etc. It can also vary from one measuring cup to another. I've seen the weight of one cup of flour listed in different charts as anywhere between four and five ounces. That's a big difference! So your recipes may suddenly turn out a lot different than they used to if you use a chart that's not quite the same as your actual measures.

FromScratchSF Posted 15 Mar 2011 , 4:09am
post #12 of 12

Quite honestly, I use the conversion charts in the Cake Bible like they are gospel, and they have been spot on for every ingredient I've converted. It has oz and g.

Jen

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