Baking 4" High Tiers

Lounge By MissCakeCrazy Updated 13 Mar 2011 , 11:05pm by allaboutcakeuk

MissCakeCrazy Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 2:00pm
post #1 of 11

I have had a couple of people interested in high tired wedding cakes (4" high). The thing is, my cake tins are 3" high. How do I go about making in 4"? Shall I just extend the collar or bake the cake in 2 batches. I have tried baking in 2 batches but I find that this time I have to cut the domes off twice leaving me with less cake.

Also, if I do a receipe which creates an 8" cake 3" deep, how do I calulate how much of each ingredient to put in to make that extra inch? Do I divinde each ingredient used into 3 giving me an estimate of how much it takes to make 1 inch of cake, then add this on top of the original receipe?

10 replies
Tea42 Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 2:27pm
post #2 of 11

MissCakeCrazy, I think most bakers here use 2" cake pans and bake 2 layers. Tort each layer into 7/8" to 1" layers and fill. This will create the 4" cake you need.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 2:51pm
post #3 of 11

I know, in america I have found that cake makers use a different cake tin to us. In the UK, one tin which is 3" high is sold. I haven't heard of a cake maker here using a sandwich cake tin.

allaboutcakeuk Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 3:00pm
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

I have had a couple of people interested in high tired wedding cakes (4" high). The thing is, my cake tins are 3" high. How do I go about making in 4"? Shall I just extend the collar or bake the cake in 2 batches. I have tried baking in 2 batches but I find that this time I have to cut the domes off twice leaving me with less cake.

Also, if I do a receipe which creates an 8" cake 3" deep, how do I calulate how much of each ingredient to put in to make that extra inch? Do I divinde each ingredient used into 3 giving me an estimate of how much it takes to make 1 inch of cake, then add this on top of the original receipe?




Hi there MissCakeCrazy I am having exactly the same issue today to make a topsy turvy cake and I've just completed my 2 x 4" cakes (one sponge one fruit) so I hope I can be of help as I don't have any 4" tins. I found a recipe for the fruit cake on the internet and some advice on there. Basically they are saying scale the recipe up by 33% (1/3rd). I baked in one batch and extended the collar. I extended the collar outside and I also cut a piece of baking parchment (folded it in half) and lined the inside of the tin to the same height as the outside collar. I found it gave the cake more stability to rise straight by doubling the thickness of the lining inside and out. Hope this helps. Any other questions pls give me a shout. My sponge has turned out perfectly. Slight dome but more than enough that when I take the little bit off it will still be 4" high.

http://www.cheap-wedding-success.co.uk/recipes-for-8-and-10-wedding-cakes-with-4-depth.html
this is for fruit cake.

I have a recipe for a 4" high sponge if you would like it and it's scaled up for 5" round and 8" round to give a 4" high sponge. I'll PM it to you
HTH

Crazboutcakes Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 3:01pm
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

I know, in america I have found that cake makers use a different cake tin to us. In the UK, one tin which is 3" high is sold. I haven't heard of a cake maker here using a sandwich cake tin.




Just curious, but do you torte your 3" high cakes or just ice as 1 layer?

allaboutcakeuk Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 3:13pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

I have had a couple of people interested in high tired wedding cakes (4" high). The thing is, my cake tins are 3" high. How do I go about making in 4"? Shall I just extend the collar or bake the cake in 2 batches. I have tried baking in 2 batches but I find that this time I have to cut the domes off twice leaving me with less cake.

Also, if I do a receipe which creates an 8" cake 3" deep, how do I calulate how much of each ingredient to put in to make that extra inch? Do I divinde each ingredient used into 3 giving me an estimate of how much it takes to make 1 inch of cake, then add this on top of the original receipe?




Sorry just to add one more thing if you need to do a fruit 4" high and its a basic round or square (no carving required) I was told you can sandwich 2 fruit cakes together with a thin layer of marzipan to get the 4" high

caymancake Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 3:39pm
post #7 of 11

For sponge cakes, I bake two cakes and sandwich them together but for fruit cakes, I build a collar with either wax or parchment paper, and I double the paper to make sure it's sturdy and bake it in my 3 inch tins. Works great! I've recently seen some 4 inch baking tins online, so if you do a lot of wedding cakes, it might be a good investment for some of the popular sizes. I hope that helps!

MissCakeCrazy Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 4:27pm
post #8 of 11

Thanks everyone for your replies. Allaboutcake, did you mean to put the lining paper actually outside the tin aswell as inside? I didn't quite understand how you do the lining, can you explain please?

allaboutcakeuk Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 8:35pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

Thanks everyone for your replies. Allaboutcake, did you mean to put the lining paper actually outside the tin aswell as inside? I didn't quite understand how you do the lining, can you explain please?




Hi I put a double thick lining of parchment inside the tin and outside too so when it rises above the tin line the double thickness stops the parchment buckling and the cake becoming mishapen.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 10:00pm
post #10 of 11

Ok, how do you secure the outside lining to the tin?

allaboutcakeuk Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 11:05pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

Ok, how do you secure the outside lining to the tin?




I just use a piece of string

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