Fondant In The Fridge

Decorating By angshink Updated 12 Mar 2011 , 4:07pm by cowie

angshink Posted 11 Mar 2011 , 7:38pm
post #1 of 12

newbie here. Making a cake for my neice's 13th. The problem is that cake must be made one day ahead of the party and it has cream cheese icing in the layers, and cream cheese buttercream under the fondant. Is it that bad if I make the cake, cover it in fondant and then put it in the fridge the day before the party? I am thinking with the cream cheese icing it has to be kept cool. If I pull it out of the fridge a couple of hours before the party maybe the fondant will warm back up to room temp. for eating? Any thoughts or help EXTREMELY welcome. icon_biggrin.gif

11 replies
nadia0411 Posted 11 Mar 2011 , 8:13pm
post #2 of 12

yes, cream cheese needs to be refrigerated, one tip though for avoiding fondant sweating, use shortening to roll out fondant or a complete non stick mat. dont dust sugar for rolling it out, this will minimize fondant sweating a great deal. Also take it out form fridge a couple of hours and you should be good to go.I also place my cakes under fan or ac to speed up drying the condensation.
HTH

utrwong Posted 11 Mar 2011 , 11:56pm
post #3 of 12

Is it OK to put the buttercream cream cheese frosting on the cake, refridgerate it, then take it out and put the fondnat on? Or should I do it all at once and then refridgerate it? I don't know how to time myself since I have a pretty hectic schedule. I don't have a whole day to decorate the cake, so what I've done in the past was dirty ice, cover in fondant, and then leave it out since it was plain buttercream. Now with cream cheese... is it ok to refridgerate and then cover it w/ fondant? What is the best way to tackle?

Kitagrl Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 12:11am
post #4 of 12

I use my fridge for everything! The cake stays in there. The filled cake, crumb coated, stays in there. The iced cake stays in there. The fondant goes on the cold cake, and goes back in there. The finished cake stays in there. If I could put my fridge in my minivan to deliver the cake, I would. haha.

utrwong Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 3:37am
post #5 of 12

Oh nice reply! I have my red velvet baking right now. I plan to ice it with creamcheese buttercream frosting tonight and stick it in the firdge, and after i get off work tomorrow, I plan to cover it in fondant and decorate my heart out icon_smile.gif

I am trying my best to keep my cakes as fresh as possible when I work full time, and cake baking/decorating is a side hobby (a VERY expensive side hobby) and when one of my friends request a cake, I want to try to make it as fresh and nice looking as possible.

Is it OK to bake like 10 cakes, wrap them up really good, and freeze them? Buddy said it's good for up to 3 months in his book.

Kitagrl Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 3:40am
post #6 of 12

Yes I usually freeze for a day or two on purpose, I think it makes the cakes a bit more moist and flavorful.

utrwong Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 3:52am
post #7 of 12

I know this is off topic, but is Tylose sugar something that is easy acceissble in a store? Or is this something you have to special order? Unfortunately for me, I live in a small city and most of my decorating supplies come from either Hobby Lobby or Michael's. I use Duff's fondnat (bought w/ a coupon!) and his fondnat taste great! It's just so soft, it tears too easily. My friend suggested tylose sugar. I have mixed Wilton gumpaste into the Duff fondant and it works to a certain extent, except it whitens the color and don't look as bright. Besides tylose or gumpaste, what else can be done to prevent fondant tears?

Kitagrl Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 3:59am
post #8 of 12

You have to order it usually....I would not add it to fondant you are covering a cake with though....its more for drying fondant out faster, for like if you are making a decoration with it that needs to get stiff fast.

Maybe mix the Duff fondant half and half with Wilton, or try making marshmallow fondant and mixing it half and half with the Duff to see if it makes it easier to work with for you.

utrwong Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 4:15am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

You have to order it usually....I would not add it to fondant you are covering a cake with though....its more for drying fondant out faster, for like if you are making a decoration with it that needs to get stiff fast.

Maybe mix the Duff fondant half and half with Wilton, or try making marshmallow fondant and mixing it half and half with the Duff to see if it makes it easier to work with for you.




Mix with Wilton white fondant or Wilton Gumpaste? I done gumpaste and it works ok. As far as covering goes, do you recommend to cover the cream cheese buttercream cake as soon as I take the cake out of the fridge, or should I let it sit out for awhile? Or cover it as soon as I'm done icing with the cream cheese? I just took my cakes out. Waiting for them to cool down now.

utrwong Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 5:33am
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I use my fridge for everything! The cake stays in there. The filled cake, crumb coated, stays in there. The iced cake stays in there. The fondant goes on the cold cake, and goes back in there. The finished cake stays in there. If I could put my fridge in my minivan to deliver the cake, I would. haha.




will the sweating affect the fondant texture or taste? That's my main concern with fondant cakes. Buddy supposedly uses a special refridgerator to keep his fondant cakes fresh.

Kitagrl Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 1:43pm
post #11 of 12

I have refrigerators that are regular, but are just for cakes. They work just fine. I always cover my cakes ice cold and firm.

I personally would never mix gumpaste into fondant I'm covering a cake with.

cowie Posted 12 Mar 2011 , 4:07pm
post #12 of 12

I personally have added Tylose powder to fondant to cover a cake with. I have had to use this if the fondant is super soft, I only add a little amount though and you have to be very careful that it doesn't get too dry. I'd only use if to cover a cake if necessary. Most types of fondants I don't think you would have to do this to though.

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