Upside Down Icing Technique

Decorating By Freyde Updated 23 Mar 2011 , 7:36pm by zespri

Freyde Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 8:12pm
post #1 of 9

i have been looking for videos on the net on upside down icing method but couldnt seem to find any...does anyone of any?? Is this method much easier?? i want to try this out but im abit worried about flipping the cake.. icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif

8 replies
cakedout Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 9:19pm
post #2 of 9

I've tried this once on a small cake and it works. I just don't use it on a regular basis because I don't use an icing like this.

Anywho- go to the SEARCH section and put in Upside Down Technique...or go to the recipe section and in the Techniques section there is a tutorial posted by Jackie. I'd post the link, but I'm not good at figuring out how to do that! icon_confused.gif

HTH

bobwonderbuns Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 9:37pm
post #3 of 9

I've done Oriental Stringwork which involves flipping a cake upside down, but I only do that with a 3 inch solid (no filling) cake. Otherwise... well, you can imagine. There's an article here on CC about this method.

yums Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 9:51pm
post #4 of 9

I have done this method with a 10" cake with no problems. I refrigerate my cakes so they are pretty solid.

q2wheels Posted 10 Mar 2011 , 4:42pm
post #5 of 9

There is a step by step article here on CC (no video):

http://cakecentral.com/articles/69/upside-down-icing-technique-for-perfectly-smooth-icing

I've done it with squares, round and 1/2 sheet (12"x18")...worked really well for me.

HTH,

Toni Ann

Jeff_Arnett Posted 11 Mar 2011 , 5:57pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freyde

i have been looking for videos on the net on upside down icing method but couldnt seem to find any...does anyone of any?? Is this method much easier?? i want to try this out but im abit worried about flipping the cake.. icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif


Hi...this is actually my technique, so I can help you with it. The tutorial mentioned in the post above is me as well. It's really not hard to flip a large cake....more scary to think of than anything....

Over time, I have made some changes to the original technique.....

1. I've tried a number of different materials and have now found that plastic coated freezer paper gives the best results....much better than parchment or waxed paper will.

2. Some people have had problems with small holes in the top of the cake when they peel off the paper....to help fix this.....spread the icing to within 1/2 inch or so of the outline, cover with a piece of waxed paper or plastic wrap and use a fondant smoother to press down hard on the icing, rubbing in circles until you have it spread out to fill your outline. Then chill and proceed as usual.

If you need anymore help, let me know. You are more than welcome to email me privately if need be.

Jeff

imagenthatnj Posted 11 Mar 2011 , 6:10pm
post #7 of 9

There's good instructions on this blog (from AngelFood4, a CC member). That's all she uses with IMBC, regular BC, and also with ganache.

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2011/01/baptism-cake.html

LisaPeps Posted 11 Mar 2011 , 6:28pm
post #8 of 9

What I do is Sellotape a piece of parchment to one of my glass chopping boards, making sure it attached well and isn't wrinkled. I then draw the size of the cake onto the parchment eg 8" round or 8" square, then I add the ganache to the shape like jeff described. I then stack and fill my layers, finishing with a thin layer of ganache to adhere a cardboard round/square to the top (which will be the bottom when finished) of the cake. I then make sure it is level using a spirit level (you could weight the cake down now to ensure there's no bulge, with ganache I have found that there is no need). I then ganache the sides following the shape of the cardboard round/square. Check the sides are straight using the spirit level again. I use the dough scraper to "hot knife" it, just heat it over your gas burner. Then chill the cake and flip it over when it's set. When you use ganache everything sets much firmer and you can hold the sides when you flip the cake so there is relatively no risk involved.

zespri Posted 23 Mar 2011 , 7:36pm
post #9 of 9

That's very kind of you to help Jeff icon_smile.gif

May I ask, what's plastic coated freezer paper? There are different products/names in different parts of the world, so I'm hoping there will be something equivalent in NZ.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett

1. I've tried a number of different materials and have now found that plastic coated freezer paper gives the best results....much better than parchment or waxed paper will.


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