Outdoor Wedding Cake??

Decorating By sodagirl Updated 9 Mar 2011 , 4:28pm by Marianna46

sodagirl Posted 8 Mar 2011 , 11:59pm
post #1 of 6

I have a 3 tier fondant cake for a wedding this weekend and I was just told it is going to be outside on the beach. This worries me a little. Any tips from someone who knows how the cake might react would be great. Thank you CC!

5 replies
kakeladi Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 12:35am
post #2 of 6

Though I have never had one displayed at the beach I have made dozens that were for outdoor weddings. There should not be any problems

Marianna46 Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 12:59am
post #3 of 6

What's the weather like where you are? If it's hot and humid, use as little moistening as possible under your fondant. In other words, avoid buttercream and use something like ganache. Try not to have the cake in direct sunlight, because the direct heat can turn your cake into a mess. On the other hand, kakeladi's probably right about their being no problem.

indydebi Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 5:14am
post #4 of 6

First thing I would ask is "is there going to be a tent for the food?" because in my area, HD requires food to be covered, i.e. under a tent or canopy. So know what the state laws require and then find out if they will be following those.

Had to argue with one of my brides, once, on this issue. She didnt' want to spend the money on a tent to protect $4000 worth of food!

sodagirl Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 8:20am
post #5 of 6

Thank you so much for the replies. The wedding is in the evening and it will be under a covered area. Luckily, it is not too hot or humid now. Thank you for the reassurance. One more question..... I plan on refrigerating it overnight, should I bring it back to room temp before I transport it to be left outside?

Marianna46 Posted 9 Mar 2011 , 4:28pm
post #6 of 6

Unless there is something perishable in it, like fresh fruit or pastry cream, there is really no need to refrigerate it at all. The thing about refrigeration is that when you bring the cake back to room temperature, condensation forms on it and you have to let it dry really well or it can mess up your fondant. It takes several hours for the condensation to dry. I never refrigerate because the humidity in Cancún doesn't ever let the cake dry out completely (so I obviously never use perishable fillings, etc.), but if you really need to, I'd say you should plan on letting the cake come to room temperature and drying before you move it. Anybody else have an opinion on this?

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