KMaryP Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:19am
post #1 of

I baked my first 6x3 square and 2 6x2 rounds at my normal baking temp of 325. All came from the same batch of batter and were cooked together in the same oven/same time. The 2 rounds came out perfect, but the square was a total fail. The sides rose really fast, and although the center eventually cooked, it remained a good inch lower than the rest of the cake. By the time the middle was done, the sides were overdone. I've never had to use a heating core in a 6" pan, but then again, they were round pans. Is a heating core a necessity no matter the size of a square pan? Is a flower nail even tall enough to work in a 3" deep pan?

BTW, the pan is a magic line - very heavy duty. I have to say the corners turned out beautifully - too bad there's a giant crater in the middle!

22 replies
Brenda41 Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:32am
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Maybe it wasn't the pan. Sometimes the flour used in the batter is not good and this happens.

cheatize Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:36am
post #3 of

I don't think it was the pan. Where did you sit the pans in the oven?

sebrina Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:37am
post #4 of

Oh no! Sometimes that happens to me when I over beat my eggs. icon_redface.gif

leah_s Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 5:00am
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I think it was the 3" tall pan. They don't bake right IMO.

bakingkat Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 5:39am
post #6 of

If the pans are too close to each other they will rise towards each other, or if it's too close to the sides of the oven those areas will rise quicker/higher. You want at least 3-4 inches between each cake and the walls, that should help getting even cakes. I baked 12" squares last week using the bake even strips and they turned out perfectly. HTH

CakeandDazzle Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 6:10am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I think it was the 3" tall pan. They don't bake right IMO.


cake_architect Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 6:12am
post #8 of

grrrrr i just bought a set of 3" tall magic line sqare pans- i sure do hope its not the pans!

KMaryP Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 1:03pm
post #9 of

Thanks for all the replies. I used the same batch of batter for all 3 cakes.

I had the pans situated in the oven in a triangle formation. The 2 rounds were closest to the sides of the oven, in the front, and the square was in the center of the oven in the back. Half-way through the baking time I reversed the formation. I felt there was plenty of space between the pans and the sides of the oven.

I sure hope it wasn't the pan! Like cake_architect, I just bought several of 3" tall magic line pans (all square) and those babies weren't cheap!

leah_s Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 1:26pm

Magic Line pans are the best. However, I don't like any brand of 3" pan.

Brenda41 Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 3:42pm

You opened the oven? You're not supposed to open the oven until baking is over.

Emmar308 Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:08pm

If you open the oven during baking, your cakes going to sink.

LindaF144a Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:09pm

The best way to find out if it was the recipe, pan or oven is to bake them individually in the oven instead of all at once. Then if it bakes fine, you will know it was the amount you had in the oven, or from opening the oven too much. If it fails, then it could be the pan or the recipe.

mareg Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:36pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I think it was the 3" tall pan. They don't bake right IMO.



Ditto I hate mine. Not one cake has baked right. icon_sad.gif

imagenthatnj Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 4:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Magic Line pans are the best. However, I don't like any brand of 3" pan.




Better to get 2" pans. I'm with Leah. I learned this after buying a few 3" pans. Had to give them away.

KMaryP Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 1:01am

Thanks everyone. I may try again with only the square pan in the oven with a heating core and see what happens. If I have the same results, I'll have some 3" magic line pans in various square sizes for sale - cheap! icon_sad.gif

indydebi Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 5:59am

I dont' think it had anything to do with being square .... I think its the 3" pan.

logically, a 3" pan will need to bake longer than a 2" pan, so I would reduce the temp on the 3" tall pan. Also, I've never used a heating core in any of my cakes (nor have I used flower nails ... not even in my 14x22x2 sheet pan) but I am a firm believer in the baking strips. Gosh, a heating core would eat up the whole center of a 6" cake! icon_surprised.gif

here's the link on where I explain the science on why baking strips work ... and why the middle of your cake baked slower than the edges: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6626888.html#6626888

CakeandDazzle Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 8:22am

opening an oven doesnt make a cake fail......

indydebi Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 11:10am
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

opening an oven doesnt make a cake fail......


This was my thought also, but it may depend on the recipe. I've never had in happen in my life (and when I bake multiple cakes at once, that door is open and shut alot to pull the smaller ones out as they finish baking before the larger ones) but I remember as a kid in my aunts house we had to tiptoe thru the kitchen when she was baking. Part of it, I think, was overreaction to what SHE had been taught growing up, 'coz for all of the caution and concern, I don't recall any fallen cake disasters in my lifetime.

I think slamming an oven door RIGHT at the EXACT wrong moment might cause some harm ...... icon_rolleyes.gif

CakeandDazzle Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 3:05pm

I do the same thing. i throw in 5 different cakes in different sizes and replace them when taken out... not only is my oven opened a ton, but i move & rotate my pans as well.... Yes an old wives tale I think, unless youre making a souffle!

emiyeric Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 3:40pm

All of my square pans (and one of my 8-inch rounds) are Magic Line 3-inch. I'm hardly a pro, so I absolutely love them because I can torte and level with all confidence and know I will still end up with a 4-inch-tall tier. But I do always use a flower nail on my 8-inch squares and up (not the case for your 6-inch), and like Indy said, I do have to let them stay in the oven considerably longer than the rounds. I bake at very low temps regardless, so I don't generally have the problem of grossly overdone sides with underdone middle, but the flower nail is a must. HTH!

KMaryP Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 3:42pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Gosh, a heating core would eat up the whole center of a 6" cake! icon_surprised.gif



You're right! I meant a flower nail (I use the terms interchangeably.) icon_redface.gif Actually, I don't know if a flower nail is long enough to stick out the top of a 3" cake or if that would even matter. I guess that's another experiment I'll have to try.

I do have bake even strips - I don't know why I didn't think to use them.

As for opening the oven, I ruled that out as the culprit because 2 of the 3 cakes I baked came out perfectly. icon_wink.gif

Emmar308 Posted 6 Mar 2011 , 6:37pm

[quoteopening an oven doesnt make a cake fail......[/quote]

I beat a ton of air into my cakes (madeira recipe) , and always get at least an inch and a half to 2 inch rise on all cakes i make. I cook at 140 c for a longer time than the recipe states, with newspaper wrapped round the tin (i also use 3 inch high tins). My cakes never dome but if i open the oven door at any point before the cake is completely baked, it will sink in the middle and the centre of the cake will be sad.

If you're baking for example a fruit cake which doesn't rise so much, then this wont happen. As far as cake mix cakes, i don't know. But i promise you a scratch cake, airy mix will sink if you open the door. I guess not every cake recipe bakes the same.

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