Help Need Gluten Free Recipes

Baking By rntyler Updated 5 Mar 2011 , 8:02pm by rntyler

rntyler Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 3:35am
post #1 of 12

I have an order and customer that is allergic to gluten I need to find gluten free cake recipes any kind I would like to give them as many option as I can any recipes that you can give would be appreciated

11 replies
FromScratchSF Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 4:04am
post #2 of 12

I offer 2 gluten-free options. My flourless chocolate cake is a basic chocolate custard sprinkled with a little powdered sugar and garnished with some sort of fruit or jam. My 2nd option is a cheesecake. I make a very old school vanilla cheesecake (no flour or corn starch) but for the crust I homemake candied walnuts (and/or pecans), sprinkle a little cinnamon and fresh nutmeg over them, and line the bottom of the pan in place of the crust (parchment lined cake pan, not springform). Pour batter over the top and bake as usual. When the cheesecake is cooled/chilled, I turn it out onto a cake board (or plate for personal sized ones) with the nut side up - the sugar from the candied walnuts mix with the extra liquid from the cheesecake batter and makes a natural gooey nutty caramel that dribbles over the sides.

I stay away from full-on gluten free baking because the customer tends to be let down... they want a cake that tastes like a regular cake - and I've yet to ever have a gluten free cake that tastes like a cake made with wheat flour. Not to say they aren't out there, I just haven't had one yet.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 4:10am
post #3 of 12

Have you tried doing a google search? I did a quick search and this is what I came up with:
http://www.google.com/search?q=gluten+free+cake+recipes&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:IE-SearchBox&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=ie7&rlz=1I7RNSN_en

I know that betty crocker has a gf cake mix and cherrybrook kitchen has them also. I have seen the cherrybrook brand at I believe target

laurenboxall Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 6:53am
post #4 of 12

I use this recipe and just sub out flour to GF SR flour and ensure the cocoa is also gluten free.


Chocolate Cupcakes

230g Butter
4 tbsps cocoa powder
1 cup boiling water
2 cups self-raising flour (can be gluten free)
2 cups sugar
½ cup buttermilk
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla

Pre-Heat Oven to 180C


In saucepan melt butter, add cocoa to the melted butter and stir. Add in boiling water and let it boil for 30 seconds, then turn off heat and set aside.

In a large bowl mix together flour and sugar. Pour in chocolate mixture and mix together just until combined.

In a separate bowl combine buttermilk and eggs and beat. Add in vanilla and mix together well.

Pour into chocolate mixture and mix well.

auzzi Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 8:37am
post #5 of 12

CHECK with the client, "allergic to gluten" is not the same as "coeliac" - "allergic" can be life-threatening ..

Quote:
Quote:

the customer tends to be let down... they want a cake that tastes like a regular cake - and I've yet to ever have a gluten free cake that tastes like a cake made with wheat flour. Not to say they aren't out there, I just haven't had one yet.




What is regular cake? Pound cake? butter cake? sponge cake? chiffon cake? a standard recipe or a mixture out of a box? A consistent and practised gluten-free baker can produce wonderful concoctions that are just as good, or better than, wheat-based products.

As laurenboxall says, the Chocolate Cupcakes listed can be easily changed to GF by using a GF flour mix. As they are cupcakes, it is not really necessay to include xanthan gun [gluten substitute]. Some mixes have it included, most blends do not. The recipe is not suitable as a cake, unless it includes an amount of xanthan gun.

People who are coeliac, allergic to wheat, or just gluten- sensitive or intolerant, are vigilant about what they eat. The times that they are "glutened" is when they ingest product that is cross-contaminated at the food source.

Wheat Flour dust [containing gluten] can stay airborne in kitchens for many hours after use. When it settles, it will contaminate surfaces, utensils, and uncovered gluten-free food.

Baking Notes: not complete and not limited to -

1. NO wooden utensils: they are highly absorbent [no rolling pin, no cake board]
2. NO wooden and plastic cutting boards: nicks, grooves and scratches can retain particles
3. NO Plastic storage containers (absorbs gluten just like food odours and colours).
4. DON'T use the same flour-sifter for gluten-free and regular flours.
5. DON'T prepare gluten-free foods on the same surface used to prepare foods with gluten unless the surface has been thoroughly cleaned.
6. DON'T "Dip and spread" products, eg peanut butter or honey - they could be contaminated from previous usage.
7. items [eg piping tips, cookie cutters], and baking pans that are made with "seams", "rivets", or crevices, may accumulate gluten material and runs a risk of contamination.

laurenboxall Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 10:45am
post #6 of 12

I've used the cupcake recipe for cakes - just cooked it for longer. It's still fairly light though so I's only use it for single tier cakes or small multi-tier cakes.

I used it for this cake and it worked fine: http://laurenboxall.weebly.com/1/post/2011/02/coopers-mario-kart-cake.html
To get some perspective, the top tier was only 4"

rntyler Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 12:28pm
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

CHECK with the client, "allergic to gluten" is not the same as "coeliac" - "allergic" can be life-threatening ..

Quote:
Quote:

the customer tends to be let down... they want a cake that tastes like a regular cake - and I've yet to ever have a gluten free cake that tastes like a cake made with wheat flour. Not to say they aren't out there, I just haven't had one yet.



What is regular cake? Pound cake? butter cake? sponge cake? chiffon cake? a standard recipe or a mixture out of a box? A consistent and practised gluten-free baker can produce wonderful concoctions that are just as good, or better than, wheat-based products.

As laurenboxall says, the Chocolate Cupcakes listed can be easily changed to GF by using a GF flour mix. As they are cupcakes, it is not really necessay to include xanthan gun [gluten substitute]. Some mixes have it included, most blends do not. The recipe is not suitable as a cake, unless it includes an amount of xanthan gun.

People who are coeliac, allergic to wheat, or just gluten- sensitive or intolerant, are vigilant about what they eat. The times that they are "glutened" is when they ingest product that is cross-contaminated at the food source.

Wheat Flour dust [containing gluten] can stay airborne in kitchens for many hours after use. When it settles, it will contaminate surfaces, utensils, and uncovered gluten-free food.

Baking Notes: not complete and not limited to -

1. NO wooden utensils: they are highly absorbent [no rolling pin, no cake board]
2. NO wooden and plastic cutting boards: nicks, grooves and scratches can retain particles
3. NO Plastic storage containers (absorbs gluten just like food odours and colours).
4. DON'T use the same flour-sifter for gluten-free and regular flours.
5. DON'T prepare gluten-free foods on the same surface used to prepare foods with gluten unless the surface has been thoroughly cleaned.
6. DON'T "Dip and spread" products, eg peanut butter or honey - they could be contaminated from previous usage.
7. items [eg piping tips, cookie cutters], and baking pans that are made with "seams", "rivets", or crevices, may accumulate gluten material and runs a risk of contamination.







Thank you everyone the cust is allergic he is family friend. I think I may just stick with a box because of this I will take extra precautions with everything that will be involved. I feel for the guy he can't eat hardly anything. Thank you for all the recipes and recommendations it is very.much appreciated. Let me just say I love this site. Everyone here is so kind and helpful.

FromScratchSF Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 6:12pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

What is regular cake? Pound cake? butter cake? sponge cake? chiffon cake? a standard recipe or a mixture out of a box? A consistent and practised gluten-free baker can produce wonderful concoctions that are just as good, or better than, wheat-based products.




I live in San Francisco, I've had gluten free stuff that even I didn't know was gluten free, and that says a LOT since I am way into food science and scratch organic baking. But I am not a gluten free baker, I choose to not get into that because of all the hazards you listed. I make sure my customers sign "serve/eat at your own risk" waivers, saying that I followed a gluten-free recipe but it's not guaranteed since all my confections are made in a gluten-using kitchen.

Anyway, I don't disagree with you, this was not meant as an insult to gluten-free bakers - but keep in mind the majority of the posters here on CC make cake out of a box and can't or don't make scratch cakes, let alone are interested in learning to become consistent practiced gluten free bakers (case in point - post 3... "they make box mixes!"). They want a quick recipe that they can serve for this one-time request. Gluten free ingredients are also not available everywhere and/or super expensive, so running a test kitchen to perfect a recipe in most cases is not feasible.

I only assumed all that from the very short original request looking for gluten free recipes and did not get the impression the OP wanted to become a gluten-free baker, so if my assumptions are incorrect sorry about that. That's why I said to stick with recipes that by their nature don't contain flour and contain ingredients they probably have on hand, because a lot of people here would make a recipe once, sub out flour for GF flour then call it an expensive failure because the texture is NOT the same, especially if they are comparing it to that artificially flavored and artificially moist WASC box cake that "every LOVES!"

You know what I mean?

Rock on, and good luck!

Jen

rntyler Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 5:27pm
post #9 of 12

I would love to perfect some gluten free scratch recipes just so that I have options for people that have this allergy but I don't want to experiment on a customer I would rather use a box until I perfect them at home my family loves to let me try new recipes out on them and if I can perfect some to the point that my family who has never had gluten free food loves them then I would be comfortable using it in my business. No offense taken to your posticon_smile.gif I think I will stick to a good box until I get some perfected.recipes though. If any does have some recipes that are gluten free I would love to get them. Thank you all for your help

rntyler Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 8:02pm
post #11 of 12

Thank you I will try soon

rntyler Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 8:02pm
post #12 of 12

Thank you I will try soon

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