Covering Biscuit Cake In Fondant

Decorating By Mamerpp Updated 29 Apr 2014 , 9:30am by Mimimakescakes

Mamerpp Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 9:05pm
post #1 of 31

Hi just looking for some advice on covering a biscuit cake in fondant please.

Would love to know whats the best thing to use underneath and is there any tips to make it come out alright?! Thanks a million!

30 replies
leah_s Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 10:53pm
post #2 of 31

What on Earth is a biscuit cake? I suspect you're not U.S. based?

cheatize Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 11:59pm
post #3 of 31

Biscuits should mean cookies. Are you stacking cookies and want to cover them in fondant?

lilmissbakesalot Posted 3 Mar 2011 , 12:06am
post #4 of 31

I think just covering a cookie with fondant vs royal icing??

What I do is to pop the cookies in the oven and cut the fondant out with the same cutter and let that set up a wee bit while the cookies are baking... then as soon as they come out I place the fondant on the cookie while it's piping hot and it melts onto the cookie and stays put.

Then you let it cool and the fondant sets up nice and firm and you can decorate with more fondant or royal icing.

icon_smile.gif

Charmed Posted 3 Mar 2011 , 12:13am
post #5 of 31

I think the biscuit is a sponge cake.

Bluehue Posted 3 Mar 2011 , 12:25am
post #6 of 31

Miight it be where one makes large biscuits and then stacks them using a filling inbetween each on.

I have seen these on Google.
Different countries make different flavoured biscuits - and then a filling more suited to that country.
http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=en&source=imghp&biw=1021&bih=618&q=biscuit+cake&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=



What Americans call cookies here in Australia we call Biscuits.
Its only since joining CC that the term Cookie has come into my vocab icon_smile.gif


Bluehue

Mamerpp Posted 3 Mar 2011 , 9:21pm
post #7 of 31

Oh dear sorry about the confusion girls!!! Yes Im from Ireland and never thought about the different names for things!

Im talking about Chocolate biscuit cake. This one here is covered with fondant -

http:[email protected]/4428207730/

You possibly know them under a different name? They taste so yummy and are very popular here. Im only new to cake decorating, and really wanted to try one but wanted to check first about getting it smooth enough etc. I've since read that you can use marzipan or just buttercream as normal.

Here's a recipe if anyone is interested:

This makes a 6"square / 7" round cake.

1lb dark chocolate
4oz butter
2 Packs of Rich Tea biscuits/cookies roughly broken
2 tins of condensed milk

Melt the butter on a low heat, when the butter is melted start adding the chocolate a few pieces at a time until it is all melted.
Stir in the two cans of condensed milk.
Stir Choc/milk mixture into the broken biscuits and put into tin

Nuts such as flaked almonds or hazelnuts can be added or things like raisins or a packet of maltesers.
Also alcohol such as Baileys or rum.

Sorry for the confusion! I've kind of answered my own question now!

leah_s Posted 3 Mar 2011 , 9:39pm
post #8 of 31

So what's a malteeser?

Relznik Posted 3 Mar 2011 , 10:26pm
post #10 of 31

I only know what choc biscuit cake is, because my best friend lives in Ireland.

Where abouts are you? icon_smile.gif

lilmissbakesalot Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 12:40am
post #11 of 31

just because I love this little trick... LOL

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=maltesers



That looks wickedly good though... I've never made one, but I imagine you just have to level it off and cover it like a rich fruitcake. A layer of marzipan would even things out before you go at it with fondant as would buttercream.

=]

cheatize Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 1:48am
post #12 of 31

It looks like maltesers are malted milk balls. The big brand name over here is Whoppers. Also the name of a hamburger sandwich from Burger King. But I digress....

I learn something new every day. icon_smile.gif

Mamerpp Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 8:08pm
post #13 of 31

LOL lilmissbakesalot!!! That link is very good!! Thanks for the tips.

Yep thats what maltesers are - sorry for the confusion again!

Last week I mentioned mmf in a local cake forum as I made it recently and had learned all about it on here, and they didnt know what I was on about!! Always fun to hear the differences in countries!

Im originally from County Roscommon in the west of Ireland but now living in County Kildare, about 1 hour outside Dublin.

Love this site!

cheatize Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 8:35pm
post #14 of 31

Over here a biscuit is a bread leavened by baking powder or baking soda instead of yeast. Like a dinner roll, but homestyle.

Chellescakes Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 11:14am
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

Over here a biscuit is a bread leavened by baking powder or baking soda instead of yeast. Like a dinner roll, but homestyle.




we would call that a scone , Or a big one we would call a damper . But then I am an Australian with an Irish heritage icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Chellescakes Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 11:19am
post #16 of 31

yum for the bikkie cake , especially with maltezers . We used to make something similar at work like it but it was called a Hedgehog , it was made as a slice. I think it had coconut in it as well.

Chellescakes Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 11:29am
post #17 of 31

Oh and to cover it , I would probably ganache it first , then cover in fondant , once the ganache is dry I just brush it with a little sugar syrup carefully wiping up the excess from the bottom and then cover with fondant,

there can never be enough chockie right ?

Mamerpp Posted 5 Mar 2011 , 9:57pm
post #18 of 31

Thanks for all the advice girls, much appreciated.

Kilmogany Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 9:50pm
post #19 of 31

AHi there I'm on line doing a search for how to cover a biscuit cake with fondant and saw your post can you tell me how it's done please. Thanks

Relznik Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 11:23pm
post #20 of 31

My friend makes a lot of chocolate biscuit cake...  she covers in ganache, which she leaves to set and then covers in sugarpaste (fondant).  She lightly brushes the ganache with a simple syrup before covering with the sugarpaste so that it sticks.

lovelycakes1234 Posted 13 Apr 2014 , 2:44pm
post #21 of 31

I am also having the same problem. The issue I have is Ganache has cream in it ... and fondant icing cant sit in a fridge .. which is what the fresh cream would need?! 

 

Is there any thing else that could be put under the icing?? 

cakegrandma Posted 13 Apr 2014 , 4:13pm
post #22 of 31

lovelycakes1234,

You can put a fondant covered cake in the fridge if you like.  When you take it out, let it set on the counter until all the condensation is gone.  Don't try to wipe it with anything or touch it as all marks will stay on there from fingers.  It will work just fine.;-D

stucker92 Posted 24 Apr 2014 , 1:35pm
post #23 of 31

AA quick way I've discovered around the ganache is to use a chocolate spread :) the exact same principal involved. Just use a hot knife, palate knife or scraper to smooth

Mimimakescakes Posted 24 Apr 2014 , 9:29pm
post #24 of 31

Ganache is shelf stable and does not need refrigerating . That is why we mainly use it in Australia. It is usually good for about two weeks out of the fridge.  Although I know some of my cakes it has lasted up to three. ( people unable to cut the cake because they didn't want to destroy it )

Relznik Posted 27 Apr 2014 , 9:17am
post #25 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mimimakescakes 
 

Ganache is shelf stable and does not need refrigerating . That is why we mainly use it in Australia. It is usually good for about two weeks out of the fridge.  Although I know some of my cakes it has lasted up to three. ( people unable to cut the cake because they didn't want to destroy it )

 

Mimimakescakes - unfortunately, in the UK many of our Environmental Health Officers (local authority officers in charge of food businesses, amongst other things) don't agree.  Frustratingly, it does seem to vary upon personal opinion of the EHO as to whether ganache is allowed to be used without our stringent rules regarding refrigeration of cream!

Mimimakescakes Posted 27 Apr 2014 , 10:37am
post #26 of 31

You can make it with , coconut cream or even water or fruitjuice.  Although surprisingly the coconut cream version does not last as long . 

Relznik Posted 27 Apr 2014 , 10:08pm
post #27 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mimimakescakes 
 

You can make it with , coconut cream or even water or fruitjuice.  Although surprisingly the coconut cream version does not last as long . 


I thought if you get water into melted chocolate it 'seizes'? 

MBalaska Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 2:10am
post #28 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Relznik 
I thought if you get water into melted chocolate it 'seizes'? 

 

Yes but sometimes it works in your favor.  You can make a batch of Nestles chocolate chip fudge, add about a half cut of super hot water, and use it as a cake filling.

Crazy-Gray Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 8:00am
post #29 of 31

I have had to spend a lot of time (and money!) convincing my Environmental Health Officer that ganache is stable. if anyone else needs some evidence to do the same there is a book called "the art of the chocolatier" by Ewald Notter,  it has a section on ganache and states that it's safe at room temperature for 2 weeks (page 115, you can find the page in Google Books).  I have also had ganache made with elmea long life double cream tested in a lab. and it is also safe for 2 weeks, I can PM the results if your EHO needs more convincing, it'd be great to get them all to accept it over here!!!

:)

Relznik Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 8:05am
post #30 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crazy-Gray 
 

I have had to spend a lot of time (and money!) convincing my Environmental Health Officer that ganache is stable. if anyone else needs some evidence to do the same there is a book called "the art of the chocolatier" by Ewald Notter,  it has a section on ganache and states that it's safe at room temperature for 2 weeks (page 115, you can find the page in Google Books).  I have also had ganache made with elmea long life double cream tested in a lab. and it is also safe for 2 weeks, I can PM the results if your EHO needs more convincing, it'd be great to get them all to accept it over here!!!

:)


Oh Gray - that would be fantastic if you don't mind sharing.  Would you mind emailing to me?  That way, it's easy to save and for me to pass on to my EHO.

 

Thank you!

 

Suzanne x

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