Tips To Avoid Burn Out?

Business By Lenette Updated 4 Mar 2011 , 1:21pm by VanillaCoke

Lenette Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 11:16pm
post #1 of 6

I got so sick of cakes and clients I just stopped for a while. I am feeling like I want to get back into cakes/cookies but I know I need to do some things differently. I just thought I would check in here and see if there are any suggestions for avoiding burn out in the first place. Thanks!

5 replies
Corrie76 Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 11:35pm
post #2 of 6

Due to working full time at the "real job" I only accept two orders per week. At first it was hard to say no to the other would-be orders but now I'm used to saying no and I personally find that limiting my self to just two orders a week keeps me from getting worn down with juggling job, kids, house, and caking. Raising your prices helps with burn-out as well, it's one thing to be up until 2AM for a 300.00 cake but quite another for a 20.00 cake...moments like that is what burns people out...If possible be selective with your customers, if your gut tells you that a certain person is going to be a PITA then decline their order, because chances are they will be a PITA and we all know how irrational, mean people can burn anyone out.

Kitagrl Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 11:45pm
post #3 of 6

The best two ways to avoid burn out is not to overextend yourself (don't take more orders than you can comfortably handle...if you are staying up until 3am several nights, that means you are too busy).

The other is to charge enough money for your work. If you DO stay up until 3am, you'd rather do it knowing are earning a nice amount of money. But if you know you shortchanged yourself, you will grumble the entire time because its no fun if you are exchanging sleep for an underpriced, overworked cake.

I was getting burned out so I have tried to scale back and focus my business on bigger orders, and only like 2 (large tiered, or sculpted) per weekend. And I try to charge well for the cake orders I accept. It brings in enough money for me (since its not our main source of income, its just a very helpful side income) and its not so much work that I'm stressing out constantly.

cupadeecakes Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 1:25am
post #4 of 6

I completely agree. When I first started my business, I took any order that would pay any money. Now I have a $250 minimum order and I have started taking less bookings. And WORD on dropping PITA clients!

ysa Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 12:20am
post #5 of 6

yeah that's true..! Dropping PITA clients.! There are times i can't avoid to get burn out from cakes and clients...especially if i stay at midnight, 3 a.m. and often times longer than that.. after working on those cakes.. i will immediately go out of the house or my working area and i'll have some relaxation.. i always choose my clients..i drop them if i know they will preassure me.. 'coz i really wont be able to enjoy myself, making those cakes, or i make sure the cake is paid enough for such hardwork,only once in a blue moon, lol. icon_smile.gif

VanillaCoke Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 1:21pm
post #6 of 6

Make sure you dictate how and when things will be done. I do tastings on MY schedule. I pick the flavors. I pick the schedule things will be done according to. I let people know all of this, nicely, and I never give them the impression that they can take advantage. I agree- limit orders, and pay yourself well! I like to listen to good music while I work, and set the 'mood' icon_wink.gif

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