Oil Instead Of Butter?

Baking By Bean123 Updated 13 Mar 2011 , 4:11pm by LindaF144a

Bean123 Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 6:43pm
post #1 of 10

just wondered how I would go about replacing butter with oil in my cakes/cupcakes?

9 replies
KoryAK Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 6:53pm
post #2 of 10

Try it one for one. Yes, there is some milk in the butter that would be getting replaced with oil, but a little extra fat just means a more tender cake. If you don't like the results try replacing the butter 20% with milk and 80% with oil (a tablespoon of butter weighs 14g and 11g of that is fat)

platinumlady Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 7:03pm
post #3 of 10

I use Extra light virgin olive oil instead of butter/margarine. It keeps the cake moist longer among other benefits like taste light & fluffy texture...etc I buy it by bulk at Sam's it can be kinda pricey at the regular grocery stores. It's a direct swap...so if it calls for 1/3 cup of butter/margarine then I use 1/3 cup of the oil.

And the price has stayed constant even tho' other dairy items have gone up

KoryAK Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 11:21pm
post #4 of 10

I prefer standard vegetable oil

cakeyouverymuch Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 11:32pm
post #5 of 10

It would depend on the recipe. If it is a recipe that requires the butter and sugar to be creamed it might not work too well.

platinumlady Posted 2 Mar 2011 , 11:53pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeyouverymuch

It would depend on the recipe. If it is a recipe that requires the butter and sugar to be creamed it might not work too well.




so true never thought about that. Great point

I knew a gentlemen when I was growing up that used to use butter flavored Crisco...I wonder would that work with the new Crisco if it needed to be creamed ... hmmm

auzzi Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 12:13am
post #7 of 10

Oil is 100% fat while butter is 80% fat ..

FromScratchSF Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 2:38am
post #8 of 10

Depends on your recipe - I actually just did an extensive test on replacing my existing butter white cake recipe with oil. It did NOT work. General baking science is you should not replace a solid fat with a liquid fat. Oil is 100% fat, butter is only 80%, oil does not hold air like butter does so you need to adjust your egg to accommodate and hold the air, yet lessen your milk/buttermilk by 20% to accommodate for the extra water in the butter. Anyway, it's not a simple matter of replacing it 1=1. White cake is tricky, so I might have had luck using a different recipe like a chocolate butter, but I doubt it.

I did, however have total success replacing butter with shortening 1=1. Side by side with the same cake made with butter it looked and tasted exactly the same. My tasters couldn't tell a difference.

Jen

tryingcake Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 4:50am
post #9 of 10

well, first of all are you talking scratch or mix?

I'm afraid of changing scratch recipes and stick to whatever the creator says.

Mix, I have successfully exchanged butter, standard vegetable oil, canola oil, sunflower oil and applesauce (yes, applesauce), measure for measure. No issues.

LindaF144a Posted 13 Mar 2011 , 4:11pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

Depends on your recipe - I actually just did an extensive test on replacing my existing butter white cake recipe with oil. It did NOT work. General baking science is you should not replace a solid fat with a liquid fat. Oil is 100% fat, butter is only 80%, oil does not hold air like butter does so you need to adjust your egg to accommodate and hold the air, yet lessen your milk/buttermilk by 20% to accommodate for the extra water in the butter. Anyway, it's not a simple matter of replacing it 1=1. White cake is tricky, so I might have had luck using a different recipe like a chocolate butter, but I doubt it.

I did, however have total success replacing butter with shortening 1=1. Side by side with the same cake made with butter it looked and tasted exactly the same. My tasters couldn't tell a difference.

Jen




Ditto here and what everybody else said.
When you substitute oil, you need to only substitute 80% of what the butter is called for. Then you need to add 20% more liquid.
So for instance if the butter is 8 oz, 80% is 6.4 ounces of oil and another 1.6 oz of liquid.

However, if it is a recipe where you cream the butter/sugar together you will get a different cake. it will be heavier and denser due to the lack of air incorporated into the creaming process. You may like it, how knows. It is at least worth a baking experiment to see if it works. They will be edible, you just need to define your meaning of edible! icon_wink.gif

If you use all oil, try the one-bowl method or the two-stage method. Google both terms and you will find explanations on how to use those two mixing methods.

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