What Size Slab For 80-100 Guests Who Will Help Themselves?

Decorating By cloetzu Updated 4 Mar 2011 , 11:13pm by cabecakes

cloetzu Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 7:10pm
post #1 of 9

I just received a request for a quote for a fondant decorated 'slab' cake for a christening large enough to feed 80-100 people. I'm pretty sure the cake will be placed on a table and folks will help themselves so the sizes of the slices will vary... wondering if anyone can help me figure out what size slab to go with?

8 replies
caymancake Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 7:33pm
post #2 of 9

A 12x18 slab (either torted and filled or a double layer) will give you 72 servings, according to Wilton. A 14x22 slab will give 98 servings. So somewhere between the two will give you what you need. Personally, I base my servings on the Wilton charts. If customers want to have a bigger slice of cake, they have to pay for more servings! Once customers saw that I actually torted and filled my cakes, and that my typical cakes were anywhere between 3 1/2 to 5 inches tall they realized that the 'smaller' slice of cake went far! I hope that helps!

jewels710 Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 8:03pm
post #3 of 9

I have seen sheet cakes that have a grid design piped on them, meant to be sort of a decorative cutting guide. You could always do something like that also.

imagenthatnj Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 8:12pm
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jewels710

I have seen sheet cakes that have a grid design piped on them, meant to be sort of a decorative cutting guide. You could always do something like that also.




Me too. There is someone here that I can't find, who used to pre-cut the sheet cake into squares (a little on the surface) before icing, and then piped in between. I remember her saying that she worked at a bakery and that they did that with all the sheet cakes.

cloetzu Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 8:17pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jewels710

I have seen sheet cakes that have a grid design piped on them, meant to be sort of a decorative cutting guide. You could always do something like that also.




hmmm - that soundsinteresting... wondering how you could do it and not take away from the design or make it look like a quilt or something...

CWR41 Posted 1 Mar 2011 , 1:38am
post #6 of 9

A (98-100 serving) full sheet cake,

2 (49-54 serving) half sheet cakes (two 2" layers stacked, 2" layers side by side, or 2" layers separate),

4 (25 serving) quarter sheet cakes.

Single layers cut into 2x2x2 servings (8 cu. in.),
double layers cut into 1x2x4 servings (8 cu. in),
according to the industry standard:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

cloetzu Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 9:16pm
post #7 of 9

i don't have a full sheet pan so am recommending two 11x15s because I think folks will take pieces larger then 1x2x3 but not larger then 2x2x3... thanks for the information!

CWR41 Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 10:42pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloetzu

i don't have a full sheet pan so am recommending two 11x15s because I think folks will take pieces larger then 1x2x3 but not larger then 2x2x3... thanks for the information!




You do realize that two 11x15 1/3 sheets won't serve the 80-100 goal.

IF they took pieces 1x2, they'll get 74 servings (for double layer), but since you said they'll probably take up to 2x2 servings, they'll get fewer than 35 servings or so. Nowhere near the 80-100 servings requested.

cabecakes Posted 4 Mar 2011 , 11:13pm
post #9 of 9

It is probably a good idea to get in the habit of establishing a serving size. Don't let the customer set the serving size. Tell the customer that the normal serving size is "blah, blah, blah", and this is what you based you servings upon. If she doesn't think these are large enough portions, she may want to order a large cake. If you let the customer establish your servings sizes, you are going to get ripped off everytime.

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