Sheet Cake

Decorating By sandy5491 Updated 28 Feb 2011 , 11:33am by sandy5491

sandy5491 Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 10:59pm
post #1 of 10

I need some help. Can you double a sheet cake.I need to make a sheet cake for a babyshower and she wants a strawberry filling. About 60 people.
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9 replies
Marianna46 Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 11:19pm
post #2 of 10

According to Indydebi, a sheet cake is 18" x 24", normally made by putting two 12" x 18" half sheets together. If it's a single layer, you would cut it into 2" squares giving you 108 servings, so you would have more than enough. Another possibility is making a two-layer half sheet cake. This obviously entails the same amount of cake batter, but instead of putting them side-by-side, you stack the two cakes. Then you cut them to the standard two-layer serving size of 1" x 2", which still gives you 108 servings. Does that help?

Actually, now that I think about it, are you sure you need all 60 servings? Because a half sheet by itself will give you 54 servings. But if you want to be sure not to run out, or if you want to cut the pieces a little bigger, by all means use the full sheet or the double-layer half sheet.

CWR41 Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 11:23pm
post #3 of 10

If you double a 100-108 serving sheet cake it will also double the servings. If you double a 1/4 sheet, you'll get 50 servings. If you double a 1/3 sheet, you'll get 74 servings. You can make cupcakes to go along with the 1/4 sheet, have extra servings if you make the 1/3 sheet, or make one of each to get a little more than 60 servings.

Sangriacupcake Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 12:31am
post #4 of 10

Are you worried about the number of servings, or are you more concerned about how to make a double layered sheet cake?

I make 2 layer 18 x 24 sheet cakes all the time (these are actually called kitchen cakes.) Make sure you have a really supportive board--I use 1/2" foam core. Cardboard will not support such a heavy cake!

sandy5491 Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 12:52am
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

Are you worried about the number of servings, or are you more concerned about how to make a double layered sheet cake?

I make 2 layer 18 x 24 sheet cakes all the time (these are actually called kitchen cakes.) Make sure you have a really supportive board--I use 1/2" foam core. Cardboard will not support such a heavy cake!




I think I'm more worried about the double layered sheet cake? The cake pan I have is 11x15 and how many servings will that make. Is there a chart that I can go by.

Tea42 Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 1:02am
post #7 of 10

I think I'm more worried about the double layered sheet cake? The cake pan I have is 11x15 and how many servings will that make. Is there a chart that I can go by.[/quote]


http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

sandy5491 Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 1:07am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sangriacupcake

This chart is very handy:

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm





I think it would be better to make the 12 x 18 to be safe and can I freeze this.

Thanks Everyone for the information very helpful. thumbs_up.gif

Marianna46 Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 10:58am
post #9 of 10

Yes, you can freeze them. Some people - me included - swear by freezing cakes before decorating them to make them more moist (although I get that other people hate this idea). If you´re going to freeze, though, make sure you wrap the cakes fairly tightly (but not so tightly that you ruin their shape) in at least two layers of plastic wrap and a Ziplock or two (or some aluminum foil, if theý're too big for Ziplocks). I generally thaw them completely before I do anything to them, but others like to work with cold cakes.

sandy5491 Posted 28 Feb 2011 , 11:33am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46

Yes, you can freeze them. Some people - me included - swear by freezing cakes before decorating them to make them more moist (although I get that other people hate this idea). If you´re going to freeze, though, make sure you wrap the cakes fairly tightly (but not so tightly that you ruin their shape) in at least two layers of plastic wrap and a Ziplock or two (or some aluminum foil, if theý're too big for Ziplocks). I generally thaw them completely before I do anything to them, but others like to work with cold cakes.




Very good I just order the cake pan.
Thank you very much for your help. thumbs_up.gif

Thanks Sandy

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