Home Kitchen Idea??!?

Business By platinumlady Updated 27 Feb 2011 , 11:06pm by platinumlady

platinumlady Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 6:49pm
post #1 of 5

I wanted to run this buy you all before I talked to my landlord. I live in Kansas & I know that you have to have a separate kitchen & entrance if I you want to have a cake business from home.

So I had this idea & of course it sounds good in my head but wanted to get some feedback.

Right now I live in an apartment & I'm not sure if I wanna go invest in a house with it being just me & daughter is no longer here. I was thinking about moving from my 3 bedroom apt to 2 one bedroom apartments. This way I would have one apartment to live in & the other one bedroom would be for caking only.

This way the kitchen is separate there's a separate entrance & all caking materials & ingredients are completely separate from my personal dwelling.

In the city I'm in we can't get a license but we can register our Home cake business. I'm just not at a place where I can afford to rent a bakery. Do you think this could work? thumbs_up.gif or thumbsdown.gif Advice is definitely needed & welcomed!

Thanks in advance

4 replies
jason_kraft Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 6:58pm
post #2 of 5

Both the landlord and the city zoning board would probably take issue with a commercial business run out of a residential apartment.

In any case, I'm pretty sure renting a commercial kitchen (not a retail storefront) would be cheaper than renting a second apartment.

platinumlady Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 7:10pm
post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft



In any case, I'm pretty sure renting a commercial kitchen (not a retail storefront) would be cheaper than renting a second apartment.




Thanks Jason

What the difference between a commercial Kitchen & Store front. or where can I get information on it?

jason_kraft Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 8:10pm
post #4 of 5

A commercial kitchen rental (or an incubator kitchen) is typically for manufacturing only. Products made in a rented commercial kitchen could be picked up by customers at the kitchen on an appointment basis or delivered directly to the customer, but there's no retail shop where customers can stop by and browse what you have for sale.

Depending on the landlord, you can rent a kitchen by the hour, by the day, or by the month, and you usually share the kitchen with other tenants.

Here's an example of an incubator kitchen in Kansas City:
http://ennovationcenter.com/Kitchen_Incubator.html

platinumlady Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 11:06pm
post #5 of 5

Thank you very much Jason I really appreciate this information

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