Cher2309b Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 2:04am
post #1 of

Let's establish a global list of substitutes and definitions of cake decorating ingredients, etc.

"What's half and half?" "What does a stick of butter weigh?"

"What are Graham Crackers?" "What is Dream Whip?"

"We don't have Crisco; can I use Copha?" "Is that a 20ml or 15ml Tblspn?

How often do we read similar queries on CC?

We're spread across the world and I know I'm not the only one who is sometimes confused by cake decorating ingredients that don't exist in Australia, or wherever.

I would like to establish a Google doc where we can share substitutes and definitions around the globe. I need your help!

Could CCers please post relevant details or queries here so that I can get started on integrating the information? Don't forget to identify the country of relevance.

Thank you Melvira for your advice and everyone in anticipation of your input.
All the best,
Cheryl

48 replies
zespri Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 7:51am
post #2 of

Good idea icon_smile.gif I always have this problem here in NZ.

We don't have corn syrup here, but we have glucose. To make it the same consistency as corn syrup, put two teaspoons of warm water into a measuring cup, then fill it up to the 1/2 cup mark with glucose, and stir it in.

Half & Half - I use lite cream.

Chala86 Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 8:45am
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

Good idea icon_smile.gif I always have this problem here in NZ.

We don't have corn syrup here, but we have glucose. To make it the same consistency as corn syrup, put two teaspoons of warm water into a measuring cup, then fill it up to the 1/2 cup mark with glucose, and stir it in.

Half & Half - I use lite cream.




In the UK, I believe corn syrup if Golden Syrup - at least that's what I use. If I'm wrong it'd be nice to know.

Cher2309b Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 9:26am
post #4 of

This is great! Good to hear from you.

Zespri, I understand you started the thread" Kiwis check in here!"? Given The horrific earthquake you are currently dealing with, I feel it's not appropriate for me to ask for any input from your friends at this stage. My thoughts are with you and with everyone in Christchurch and New Zealand. Hopefully, in time, some of your friends may like to have some input here. Thank you for yours.

I also note your comments in the above-mentioned thread that a USA cup is 240mls and a NZ cup is 250 mls (250mls in Australia too.)

Also that a NZ tablespoon is 15mls whilst an Austalian tablespoon is 20mls.
Who'd like to define an English, American or European tablespoon? I think in Europe they talk in mls and grams - no spoon or cup measures; is this right?
Chala86 - my own comment on corn syrup vs golden syrup would be that golden syrup is thicker, sweeter, darker and stronger in flavour; we have both in Australia. Any other comments on this?

Thanks again for your input; please keep it coming.

sabriana Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 9:34am
post #5 of

oh boy.. this could be a long one. I am an American expat living in Ireland. It has taken me 7 years to manage my way thru the translations!

Half and Half is half milk half cream. If you are in Uk or those type places, DONT use double cream. I have found that different countries produce creams with different fat contents... Whipping cream = UK double cream. Lite cream = regular UK cream or all Irish creams.

Corn Syrup is best replaced with Golden syrup - the off shoot from sugar refining. In fact, I prefer to use Golden syrup rather than importing corn syrup.

Crisco is a vegetable fat shortening - pure white in colour and very soft. The closest thing I can find here to it is Trex (and they have stopped carrying in in Ireland icon_cry.gif ). It is NOT coconut oil, it is NOT margarine...

When US says semi-sweet chocolate they mean approximately 50- 60% cocoa content. Bittersweet is 68-72% cocoa content.
A "stick" of butter is a quarter of a pound - 4 ounces or 114grams.

Dreamwhip is a non-dairy whipped topping = sold under the name Angel Delight or Tesco makes an equivalent and puts the word delight in its name - be sure to use the VANILLA only.
Vanilla extract is NOT vanilla essence!
Cake flour cannot be bought in Europe - the EU doesn't allow bleached flour to cross our lips.
HTH

Cher2309b Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 9:44am
post #6 of

OK; so let's look at a few other puzzles:

A stick of butter in the States is, I understand, 4oz in the UK and approximately 125gms in Australia and Europe.


Crisco in the States is Copha in Australia. What about elsewhere?
Zespri, you mentioned that you use lite cream for half and half. I always wondered what that was. Any other thoughts on this?

This is great input; please keep it coming.

I just need to work out how to get this into a Google doc to make it more user friendly.
All the best,
Cheryl

Cher2309b Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 9:47am
post #7 of

Fantastic Sabriana; thank you so much for your input.

Chala86 Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 10:57am
post #8 of

1 tablespoon in the UK is 15ml

Cher2309b Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 11:11am
post #9 of

Thanks Chala.
Wonder where the Aussie 20ml teaspoon came from. Is it 20mls in the States?
All the best,
cheryl

solascakes Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 11:22am

Thanks sabriana, you broke it down,living in the UK I'm tired of looking for stuff I can't get.I usually just get on with it or just experiment till i'm happy or at least make sure the product is acceptable. Thanks Cher2309b for starting this thread,i'm sure it'll fly.

sabriana Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 12:45pm

Here's another one -

Graham Crackers are Digestive Biscuits...

I can't think of any other items at the moment but will keep checking back.

By the way, Butter in America is sold in one pound boxes - made up of 4 individually wrapped sticks - which is why we Yanks think of sticks... a stick is also equivalent to 1/2c. of butter which is the other way people write their recipes.

sillywabbitz Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 1:25pm

I just tested the US tablespoon and it's 15 ml. I have a nifty measured and kitchen scale so I'm happy to contribute any US conversions if you need them.
Because the CC notifications are a little flaky, PM me if there is anything that no one responds to state side.

Cher2309b Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 10:21pm

So Graham Crackers are digestive biscuits? They're wholemeal or half wholemeal aren't they? I've always used Arnott's milk coffee or milk arrowroot biscuits as a substitute. They work but they're smooth and white.

We now know that half and half is half milk and half cream. I've also read that you can substitute evaporated milk for half and half.

What other ingredients confuse people?

Marianna46 Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 10:57pm

In Mexico, butter is sold in 90gr sticks, which is not a big problem: 2 1/2 sticks here is equal to 2 sticks (225gr) in American recipes. The teaspoon here is also 15ml, but the cup is 250ml, as it is in Australia. This isn't a biggie, since all my measuring cups are measured in both ounces and milliliters.

No such thing as Dream Whip, Cool Whip or cake flour here, either, but the most common brand of shortening is Manteca Inca, which works just fine - I think it's the same as Crisco.

I just love the idea of this thread, Cher2309b,and hope it grows and grows. I'll certainly let you know if I think of anything else. By the way, these aren't ingredients, but it's extremely hard to come by rubber spatulas, wire cooling racks and the ever-present kitchen sponge here!

mclaren Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 11:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabriana

Dreamwhip is a non-dairy whipped topping = sold under the name Angel Delight or Tesco makes an equivalent and puts the word delight in its name - be sure to use the VANILLA only.
HTH




Hi Sabriana,

Would you care to share the exact name of the Dream Whip equiv that Tesco sells? The one you mentioned Angel Delight isn't the one that Tesco produces, is it? Sorry I'm a bit confused. .. icon_redface.gif

mclaren Posted 26 Feb 2011 , 11:42pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabriana

Corn Syrup is best replaced with Golden syrup - the off shoot from sugar refining. In fact, I prefer to use Golden syrup rather than importing corn syrup.


HTH




I normally replace corn syrup with Glucose here. However I've been seeing corn syrup sold here recently so that problem is solved thumbs_up.gif

ShandraB Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 12:10am

US sugar

We have granulated sugar, which most people just call sugar. icon_biggrin.gif

Then there is superfine sugar, which I have learned is the same as castor (or caster) sugar in the UK. It's finer than granulated. If you can't find it you can approximate it my pulsing granulated sugar in your food processor.

Then there is confectioner's or powdered sugar which is a mixture of sugar that has been made into a powder and usually has cornstarch or other things added to it. I believe it is the same as icing sugar.

Chala86 Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 9:03am
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclaren

Quote:
Originally Posted by sabriana

Dreamwhip is a non-dairy whipped topping = sold under the name Angel Delight or Tesco makes an equivalent and puts the word delight in its name - be sure to use the VANILLA only.
HTH



Hi Sabriana,

Would you care to share the exact name of the Dream Whip equiv that Tesco sells? The one you mentioned Angel Delight isn't the one that Tesco produces, is it? Sorry I'm a bit confused. .. icon_redface.gif




Tesco do sell Angel Delight and probably have their own brand too. Does anyone know what the equivilant to Crisco is sold here in the UK?

sabriana Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 9:25am

Let me preface all my posts to state that these are US to Irish/UK conversions. I lived in the US all my life (until 35) and then I have lived in Ireland for 8 years. So I know what the US product is that everyone is referring to and I know what I have had available to me here in Ireland.

Re: Angel Delight
Sorry couldn't think of the name of the stuff! Tesco sells a product (sold in the jelly aisle I think) that's called "Vanilla delight". Its a bit richer tasting than the Dream Whip, but I have used it in Indydebi's icing recipe with GREAT success!

Megan1979 Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 10:04am

I don't think copha is a substitute for Crisco. Crisco is more of a whipped vegetable shortening where Copha is rock hard. I have tried Copha in buttercream and it was AWEFUL and I ended up having lumps of hard copha through it (gross). I get a product called sno creme from Carolines Sugarart services in Adelaide Australia which is 100% vegetable fats.

Cher2309b Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 10:08am

Thanks ShandraB for the sugar details. That pretty well tallies with Australia. We have icing sugar mixture, which is icing sugar with cornflour added and pure icing sugar, which is just powdered sugar.

CakemummyCC Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 10:25am

Thank you Cher2309b for starting this thread, its cleared up a lot of confusion I had as a new starter...I always thought Copha was a substitute for Crisco too, so thanks to Megan1979 for letting me know it isn't...
One other thing, am I right in assuming "Saran wrap" is the same as Aussie "cling" wrap..?

jillyscakes Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 10:38am

[quote="Chala86"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by mclaren

Quote:
Originally Posted by sabriana

Dreamwhip is a non-dairy whipped topping = sold under the name Angel Delight or Tesco makes an equivalent and puts the word delight in its name - be sure to use the VANILLA only.
HTH



Hi Sabriana,

Tesco do sell Angel Delight and probably have their own brand too. Does anyone know what the equivilant to Crisco is sold here in the UK?





Its Trex icon_smile.gif

Cher2309b Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 11:08am

Thanks Megan1979. You've saved me from a wasted batch of lumpy Copha "buttercream". Copha is often suggested as an alternative to Crisco but I've never actually tried it.
If it's just a matter of making buttercream white then perhaps a little added "Wilton Icing Color, White-White" would do the trick.
Perhaps I'll try to get hold of some Sno Creme and try it out. What is the benefit of using Crisco over butter for buttercream?

Hi CakemummyCC. I don't know Saran Wrap but I Googled it and it appears to be the same as Cling Wrap Or Glad Wrap.

I was looking at a Wilton Facebook site where a discussion was taking place re the Crisco/Copha dilemma and lumpy Copha buttercream in Australia. Some suggestions were to buy high-ratio shortening from CK Products online, Solite available in small tubs from cake decorating shops and to buy Crisco online in 3lb tubs from USA Foods in Melbourne.
Has anyone done any of these things?

Cher2309b Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 11:18am

Sabriana, You mentioned, way back, the various creams. Does anyone have more information on types of cream in various countries?

I understand that, when a recipe mentions double cream, this is NOT the very thick King Island double cream that we see in supermarkets in Sydney. I believe it's half way between this and our regular (whipping?) cream, and I believe not available here.

I have used half regular cream and half King Island double cream mixed together. Can't remember what the recipe was but it worked out fine. Perhaps regular cream may have worked out just as well.

Cake_Karen Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 12:39pm

Ref to cream.

In England we have

Single Cream This is a pouring cream
Double Cream This is a thicker pouring cream like the above or can be whipped to make cream that will 'peak'
Extra thick Double Cream This is just a thicker version again

Hope this helps

LisaPeps Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 12:50pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclaren

Quote:
Originally Posted by sabriana

Corn Syrup is best replaced with Golden syrup - the off shoot from sugar refining. In fact, I prefer to use Golden syrup rather than importing corn syrup.


HTH



I normally replace corn syrup with Glucose here. However I've been seeing corn syrup sold here recently so that problem is solved thumbs_up.gif




Please could you tell me where you have seen it? I would like to try it out... Assuming your from the uk. Thanks.

Bluehue Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 2:24pm

Cher2309b...great thread.

This link gives a very good description to those wanting to know about the different creams found in Australia....the fat content and uses.
http://www.dairyaustralia.com.au/Products-and-Recipes/Dairy-Products/Cream/Types-of-Cream.aspx


This link gives a small insight into corn syrup/glucose strup.
http://womansday.ninemsn.com.au/food/foodfeatures/993619/corn-syrup

This link shows a picture of the glucose syrup i buy - widely available in suoermarkets throughout Australia.
http://www.queenessences.com.au/products/show.php?categoryid=5

This link gives a great insight into all Sugars available in Australia and what ingrediants go into making them...
Click on any picture and the full useage of each type is given.
The pure Icing Sugar is just that - it contains no corn flour = corn starch.
What is needed for making the smoothest BC
http://www.csrsugar.com.au/Products-And-Nutrition.aspx


This link is by far the best table i have found....and use if using a recipe from overseas.
It covers every measurement one woulod need... when conveting for an American recipe.
Just find the meausrement you require - type in the ammount and then click on Calc. -
http://www.dianasdesserts.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/tools.measures/Measures.cfm

About copha
http://www.bestrecipes.com.au/glossary/Copha-L283.html

About Crisco
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/copha.htm

I purchase Crisco from here...
http://www.usafoods.com.au/c14/desserts/cake-mixes-baking-chips-flour/


Just thought some of these links might help others find/know about the different products.


Bluehue

cookiecutters Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 2:37pm

What about a substitute for Pastry Pride or Rich's Bettercreme that is non-dairy? I know this is not exactly global, but is there anything that is shelf stable in the southern US that is equivalent?

sabriana Posted 27 Feb 2011 , 8:18pm

OK, did some digging and came up with a quick table on the fat contents of Cream in US/UK/Au/NZ

Can't attach so PM me with an email address and I will send on to you.

Hope it is helpful.

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