What Technique Are You Learning Or Just Recently Learn

Decorating By sweetmonkeycheese Updated 21 Feb 2011 , 6:21pm by NanaSandy

sweetmonkeycheese Posted 20 Feb 2011 , 5:53pm
post #1 of 16

I am nothing more than a "just for the fun of it girl" so I am not learning much as I only make a cake every other month or so everything is new to me. I was just wondering what everyone else was learning, thought it would be interesting to see what both beginners, intermediates and masters would have their minds ticking and tocking

15 replies
zespri Posted 20 Feb 2011 , 7:05pm
post #2 of 16

I was thinking that same thing myself, that every time I do a cake I learn new things, and love it!

In my most recent cakes from this weekend (two of them for twins), I learned:
1) Royal icing transfers
2) Buttercream icing upside down to get sharp edges
3) Applying silver lustre dust with vodka
4) How to make grey fondant (it's not as easy as you'd think!)
5) Not all brands of coloured sprinkles will work in a confetti cake

sullymel13 Posted 20 Feb 2011 , 7:47pm
post #3 of 16

I'm currently planning my first topsy turvy cake! Actually two - one for a 15th birthday for practice, and then a wedding! The first event isn't until April, but I have been planning for a while, and watching Sugarshack's DVD. I can't wait to get started!

zespri Posted 20 Feb 2011 , 7:50pm
post #4 of 16

sullymel, that's what I did with my first tiered cake. I made one for my cousins 21st birthday, learned HEAPS, then put it all into practice for a wedding. I watched sugarshacks buttercream and fondant videos over again before doing it too. It's like having someone standing next to you helping.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 20 Feb 2011 , 8:00pm
post #5 of 16

I learned the upside down method of frosting a cake a while ago and only used it on a couple. I thought it was a great technique, but I've noticed that I can get pretty sharp edges regardless of the technique. So last week I did a practice cake just to use up some leftover frosting and cake layers. As I finished, I thought the top needed a little more, so I added a border around the top edge. I realized then that the edge wasn't as even as I thought and so I've resolved to using the upside down method more.

I've been wanting to try a topsy turvy cake and I have my birthday coming up in a few months. I think I might do my first topsy turvy for that.

NanaSandy Posted 20 Feb 2011 , 8:01pm
post #6 of 16

Have just learned how to make some fondant figures, (still figuring that one out icon_cool.gif ) and I have started torting my cakes. They look so much better and makes the cake tastes better too. I did zebra stripes for the first time the other day. Ummmm....and always learning new fondant/gumpaste flowers. I still consider myself new to cake decorating, even though I have been doing it for several years. I am always learning something new on a cake. yeah........love caking!! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

NanaSandy Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 5:54am
post #7 of 16

what are you talking about? Upside down method????? Any answers would be appreciated!! TIA

zespri Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 6:02am
post #8 of 16

like so:
http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

what are you talking about? Upside down method????? Any answers would be appreciated!! TIA


Kitty5Kat Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 7:50am
post #9 of 16

I've never seen this method before. I really want to try it out. Does this work for cakes covered in crusting buttercream too or just the ones covered in ganache?

AngelFood4 Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 3:35pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitty5Kat

I've never seen this method before. I really want to try it out. Does this work for cakes covered in crusting buttercream too or just the ones covered in ganache?




I've used this method on crusting BC, IMBC, and ganache - pretty much anything that gets hard while in the fridge thumbs_up.gif

debbief Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 5:11pm
post #11 of 16

I LOVE the upside down method. It makes it so much easier to get a nice flat top and sharp edges.

I made my first large RKT figure. Mickey Mouse about 2 feet tall icon_smile.gif Here's a pic if you want to take a look

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/1947204

I asked for an airbrush for christmas cause I thought that would be so much better than mixing the color into my fondant (especially dark colors). Weill I got one, but I still haven't been brave enough to break it out icon_redface.gif So hopefully that will be the next new thing I learn.

metria Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 5:19pm
post #12 of 16

i'm learning how to work with rice cereal treats as the internal structure for modeling. boy what a mess! i'll be sweeping my kitchen for days once i'm done.

sweetmonkeycheese Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 5:21pm
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

like so:
http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

what are you talking about? Upside down method????? Any answers would be appreciated!! TIA




what is emulsifier?
Step 1: Make the Ganache: Heat the heavy cream until it just starts to bubble, pour over chocolate and let it sit for about a minute to melt. Use an emulsifier to blend it all together for about 30 seconds, set aside to cool. After cooled, cover and let it sit overnight at room temperature to set. The Ganache will set into a thick but smooth peanut butter consistency.

debbief Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 5:31pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetmonkeycheese

Quote:
Originally Posted by zespri

like so:
http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by NanaSandy

what are you talking about? Upside down method????? Any answers would be appreciated!! TIA




what is emulsifier?
Step 1: Make the Ganache: Heat the heavy cream until it just starts to bubble, pour over chocolate and let it sit for about a minute to melt. Use an emulsifier to blend it all together for about 30 seconds, set aside to cool. After cooled, cover and let it sit overnight at room temperature to set. The Ganache will set into a thick but smooth peanut butter consistency.




I'm thinking an emulsifier is something like this maybe?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EGA6QI/?tag=cakecentral-20

I've made lots of ganache and never used anything other than a wisk to mix it together. That works fine.

zespri Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 5:49pm
post #15 of 16

I did mine on buttercream (commented on your blog afterwards, I was so excited!). My friend also pointed me to your blog post with the square cake, so I'm looking forward to that too. It's one of those moments where I feel like I've discovered one of the great secrets of the universe... well, the cake universe anyway icon_smile.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelFood4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitty5Kat

I've never seen this method before. I really want to try it out. Does this work for cakes covered in crusting buttercream too or just the ones covered in ganache?



I've used this method on crusting BC, IMBC, and ganache - pretty much anything that gets hard while in the fridge thumbs_up.gif


NanaSandy Posted 21 Feb 2011 , 6:21pm
post #16 of 16

thank you for the link on the upside down method. Will be giving it a try soon!! I see a practice cake in my future!! icon_rolleyes.gif

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