Cake For A Blind Child?

Decorating By mountain_laurel1183 Updated 24 Feb 2011 , 2:34am by ginger6361

mountain_laurel1183 Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:00am
post #1 of 20

Hi, I have never posted before, but I LOVE getting inspiration and ideas from all of you! Anyways, I am working on a cake for a child who is blind. She LOVES using her other senses such as taste (easy) and touch. I thought about doing some fondant with different textures, but I don't know how to make it look pretty for those who can see while making it a little more interactive. Any ideas?

19 replies
bohemiagetsajob Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:22am
post #2 of 20

What about rolling the fondant on an impression mat so she can feel the pattern? Or wires with decorations sticking out of the cake? Textures like coconut or graham crackers would be fun to touch too.

dldbrou Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:25am
post #3 of 20

Why don't you write in brail in fondant. It could go around the cake. Maybe he favorite poem. Make the dots colorful for others to see. Then put a design on the top of the cake to co-ordinate with the poem.

cakegirl1973 Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:28am
post #4 of 20

Cover RKT in fondant (bumpy), crimp the fondant, cut outs of different shapes, and ffrill the fondant for a border.

Could you incorporate music somehow? I am thinking a craft store might have something that you push a button and music plays. That would be very cool.

artscallion Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:32am
post #5 of 20

Anytime I bake for kids, I use Frontier brand butterscotch flavoring in my buttercream. It has this unbelievable smell of candy and bakery and butter. I don't think I've ever used it when someone didn't mention the delicious aroma of the cake. It really is a smell that she would be able to appreciate and savor. Plus it's delicious!

Jennifer1970 Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:35am
post #6 of 20

Sorry, but I'm a bit grossed out at the thought of the birthday kid getting all "handsy" with the cake. That's not a cake I would want a piece of!

PJ37 Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 12:45am
post #7 of 20

Agree with Jennifer1970, but why not a "smash" cake for the child and a similar larger cake for others...or it could be the top layer (and then remove for the child to "see").

DianeLM Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 1:33am
post #8 of 20

I agree that a separate cake would be preferable since it will be handled. It's gross enough having to eat a cake someone has blown/spit on! icon_smile.gif

I don't think wires would be a good idea. Too dangerous.

How about mixing some chocolate chips into the cake batter for more interest?

Kitagrl Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 1:49am
post #9 of 20

If its just family I'm sure they won't care if the child touches the cake....and most adults don't eat fondant, anyway.

Marianna46 Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 1:49am
post #10 of 20

I'm loving these ideas! The smash cake idea is great, because the party girl definitely needs to be able to feel it, as well as taste, smell and hear it (the music was a sterling idea!). Writing something in Braille is a wonderful thought and if you feel up to sculpting figures, those would be great, too.

Kitagrl Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 2:02am
post #11 of 20

I think if she washes her hands well, it would be nicest if she got to feel her REAL cake instead of just a small one....

I'm sure everyone who knows her will understand. After all, we rub our hands all over the cake when we make it! We just make sure we are clean.

cakegirl1973 Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 2:32am
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I think if she washes her hands well, it would be nicest if she got to feel her REAL cake instead of just a small one....

I'm sure everyone who knows her will understand. After all, we rub our hands all over the cake when we make it! We just make sure we are clean.




I totally agree with Kitagrl. I would not want to make her feel different by making a separate cake for her to experience.

infinitsky Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 2:33am
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I think if she washes her hands well, it would be nicest if she got to feel her REAL cake instead of just a small one....

I'm sure everyone who knows her will understand. After all, we rub our hands all over the cake when we make it! We just make sure we are clean.




Ditto! thumbs_up.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by dldbrou

Why don't you write in brail in fondant. It could go around the cake. Maybe he favorite poem. Make the dots colorful for others to see. Then put a design on the top of the cake to co-ordinate with the poem.




Ditto! thumbs_up.gif

You can even write in brail on decorations too, so the birthday kid can read what are the decorations or what color are the decorations.
For example if you make Dora, she/he can read Dora.

cowboy61s_girl Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 3:26am
post #14 of 20

Have fun with it what would she like? How old is she? What is her favorite character? Wow this could be alot of fun for her. I would do something like a rainbow flavor with color and taste appealing to others but let her try and guess them. I think with texture I would use something she could relate to age appropriate.

Kitagrl Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 1:35pm
post #15 of 20

The braille idea is great...you could even do that in royal. It will get hard enough to feel.

cheatize Posted 18 Feb 2011 , 3:12pm
post #16 of 20

I love the idea of braille! The birthday child will be even more the center of attention as she reads it to the guests.

mountain_laurel1183 Posted 19 Feb 2011 , 7:58pm
post #17 of 20

Great ideas! Thanks! I will definitely use them!

I've been pondering the "handsy" problem myself. I think I may do cupcakes so everybody's is individual. That way, she can feel everything she eats without grossing anybody else out. It doesn't have to be a huge cake.

Thankyouthankyou!!!

CakeCrystals Posted 23 Feb 2011 , 4:58pm
post #18 of 20

Ditto! thumbs_up.gif

You can even write in brail on decorations too, so the birthday kid can read what are the decorations or what color are the decorations.
For example if you make Dora, she/he can read Dora.[/quote]

I like this idea alot. I think describing the decos in braille is a excellent idea.

ginger6361 Posted 24 Feb 2011 , 2:34am
post #19 of 20

Couldn't you take fondant, sculpt over a brail form, let dry, then place on top of the cake so she can ' read' the poem? Most people don't eat the fondant anyway.

ginger6361 Posted 24 Feb 2011 , 2:34am
post #20 of 20

Couldn't you take fondant, sculpt over a brail form, let dry, then place on top of the cake so she can ' read' the poem? Most people don't eat the fondant anyway.

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