sugardugar Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 4:29am
post #1 of

Hi everyone. Two questions!!!!

I'm new to cake decorating and fondant. I always use buttercream as I never really "got" how people put ganache under their fondant. I have only ever poured ganache and made truffles out of it and heard mixed reviews on if I should whip it prior to spreading (when it's going under fondant) or...? Do I make it as if I were pouring and let it settle/thicken and then spread?

This brings me to my next question.
I think some of my fondant troubles spawn from the way I'm prepping my cake. When stacking cakes I find I have an indentation that leaves an uneven side. To balance it I fill it in with icing - this tends to get thick. What I do when I need to fondant a cake is torte it, buttercream (thick if it's uneven and it ALWAYS is), refridgerate overnight. The next day I add a thin layer and stick the fondant to that. Of course when my buttercream softens my fondant is not smooth looking.
How do I fix this? I feel the even cake thing is out of my control. Do you guys slice uneven edges off as you would slice an uneven top off? If so, how do you manage to ice what's left? My cakes crumble if I'm not icing a smooth edge that was touching the pan (if that makes sense). And...how can I ganache under my fondant if I can't smooth my cake (it feels ganache would be less forgiving than buttercream).

Sorry if my questions are confusing - tysm!!!

18 replies
sugardugar Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 9:44pm
post #2 of

icon_sad.gif
No one here uses ganache under cakes or knows about trimming?

Moondance Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 9:55pm
post #3 of

Hi there,

prepare your ganache as you would for pouring, then leave it to set overnight. Next day, beat the ganache to soften it to spreading consistency and spread an even layer around the sides and top of ypur cake. Smooth it with a palette knife and leave to set - overnight or in the fridge if you are in a rush. Then take a clean palette knife or royal icing spreader, dip in boiled hot water, wipe on a dry cloth and smooth your ganace. You should be able tp get a really clean, smooth finish, as the heat smooths it out. Whilst it is still damp, I then cover it with fondant

second question - if you don't start with an even cake - you won't finish with one, whatever you do. I always level my cakes before I even begin to fill and ice! Check Planet Cake for ganache ing (?) cakes - good luck x

Coral3 Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 9:57pm
post #4 of

Use ganache that is set to room temperature (firm, but spreadable) and smooth it with a bench scraper around the sides, & a long straight spatula on top. You can trim ragged edges off the top edge with a hot serrated bread knife after the ganache has set up on the cake if necessary. If you want good instructions on using ganache under fondant then 'Planet Cake' by Paris Cutler is a really great place to start. The cakes in the book are nothing special design-wise, but the technique and finish on them is very good.

Coral3 Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 9:58pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moondance

Hi there,

prepare your ganache as you would for pouring, then leave it to set overnight. Next day, beat the ganache to soften it to spreading consistency and spread an even layer around the sides and top of ypur cake. Smooth it with a palette knife and leave to set - overnight or in the fridge if you are in a rush. Then take a clean palette knife or royal icing spreader, dip in boiled hot water, wipe on a dry cloth and smooth your ganace. You should be able tp get a really clean, smooth finish, as the heat smooths it out. Whilst it is still damp, I then cover it with fondant

second question - if you don't start with an even cake - you won't finish with one, whatever you do. I always level my cakes before I even begin to fill and ice! Check Planet Cake for ganache ing (?) cakes - good luck x




LOL you just beat me to it! Looks like we have the same book icon_biggrin.gif

sugardugar Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 10:24pm
post #6 of

Thanks guys!

So it's agreed keeping sides uneven and filling with icing is a bad idea lol..


How do you ice a cut cake? Mine always crumble, which is why I was 'filling in" instead.

hbarberycakes Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 10:43pm
post #7 of

wow this forum came in perfect timing for me! I'm doing one with ganache under fondant for the first time as well in a couple weeks! Glad I checked this out =)

Moondance Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:31pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coral3



LOL you just beat me to it! Looks like we have the same book icon_biggrin.gif




Great minds Coral!

Moondance Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 4:34pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugardugar

Thanks guys!

So it's agreed keeping sides uneven and filling with icing is a bad idea lol..


How do you ice a cut cake? Mine always crumble, which is why I was 'filling in" instead.




When I say 'level' the cakes, I mean I level the top - use a long, sharp knife or a cake leveller. The you turn the levelled top over so it becomes the bottom of your cake on the board, and your nice flat bottom is the top. I don't level the sides - place on a board the same size, and use the ganache to create a level surface - hope that helps - icon_smile.gif

sugardugar Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 6:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moondance

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugardugar

Thanks guys!

So it's agreed keeping sides uneven and filling with icing is a bad idea lol..


How do you ice a cut cake? Mine always crumble, which is why I was 'filling in" instead.



When I say 'level' the cakes, I mean I level the top - use a long, sharp knife or a cake leveller. The you turn the levelled top over so it becomes the bottom of your cake on the board, and your nice flat bottom is the top. I don't level the sides - place on a board the same size, and use the ganache to create a level surface - hope that helps - icon_smile.gif




yes i level top with a cake leveller. my problem is...the sides never seem to meet perfectly. maybe it's because i have to cut so much off the top...but the sides of my cakes are never straight. instead i would add a generous amount of bc to fill this in and pop it in the fridge over night. the next day, post-fondant, when the bc comes to room temp, i find it causes buldges...should i level the sides? ugh!

Dayti Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 6:47pm

You can "crumb coat" the sides of your cake with ganache, the same as you would with buttercream. Aim to get your ganache fairly thin to do this - you can zap it in the microwave a few seconds at a time, stirring in between to make sure it is evenly melted. Apply with a spatula to the sides of the cake - you will get crumbs in this coating, but that's fine, they will stick to the ganache and not go anywhere. After this coat has set up and is firm, you can do your final coat of ganache - here is where you keep adding and scraping, adding and scraping, until you have totally filled, even, vertical sides icon_wink.gif
If you make a "dam" out of ganache, using a piping bag, before you fill your layers with buttercream or whatever, you shouldn't have any bulges coming out the sides of the layers.

sugardugar Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 5:04am

will try ty icon_smile.gif

Chellescakes Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 1:18pm

Some great advice up there , so I won't repeat , I will add that once my ganache is set and dry , I use a little sugar syrup lightly brushed on the cake to stick the fondant to it. Make sure you clean the bottom of the cake where it meets the boasrd of any excess with a paper towel .

kimma1299 Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 2:01pm

Ok, quick question. AFter I spread the ganache and leave it to set, does it need to be covered or can it just sit out on the counter?

Moondance Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 9:00pm

I leave mine on the counter in a cake box so it's not exposed to dust etc. You can put it in the fridge though

Vanessa7 Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 9:22pm

sugardugar, some pans do not have straight sides and are larger at the top than the bottom. When I first started I really had trouble with my wilton pans causing this and soon realized it was my pans. What a pain! Check your pans. If they are flared at the top it will definately cause your sides to not be even when you layer them. You will need to level the sides in order to get a clean smooth sides. Putting an even layer of ganache and/or buttercream on the sides will help if the sides are not too far off. Hope that helps.

robbemorka Posted 15 Feb 2011 , 10:14pm

I don't care if my cakes are level or not, after using this method they most certainly are. icon_smile.gif

http://sugarsweetcakesandtreats.blogspot.com/2010/05/covering-cake-in-ganache.html

hth

cakindiva Posted 11 Oct 2013 , 12:46pm

AThis is a great post! Question.. I'm making a 3d purse and wanted to try ganache method was wondering how hard is it to cut the ganache is it like trying to cut through a chocolate bar?

810whitechoc Posted 11 Oct 2013 , 12:54pm

No, Ganache sets firm but because it is cream and chocolate it is more like cutting through fudge.

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