Any Good Ideas How To Save $ On Cake Stuff?

Lounge By Sorelle Updated 12 Feb 2011 , 5:12am by tryingcake

Sorelle Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:59pm
post #1 of 15

I live in a rural town about 130 miles to do my shopping, so today couldn't afford the gas or time to travel so I shopped in my little town and paid
$3.00 for a doz. jumbo eggs and
6.21 for a 24oz bag of Toll House Choc chips.


It's not going be easy to keep enjoying on my cake hobby .

Just curious what prices are in different parts of the country, and if you have any good ideas for saving $ on cake stuff

14 replies
tiggy2 Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 10:08pm
post #2 of 15

I shop at Costco and buy in bulk.

Sorelle Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 10:22pm
post #3 of 15

I do love Costco and shop there a lot actually, but fuel prices in my area have gone up to 3.45 a gal and Costco is 175 mile round tripicon_sad.gif

mcdonald Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 10:27pm
post #4 of 15

I shop at Aldi's...

dozen eggs 49 cents
butter 1.59
sour cream 99 cents

I have one right down from my "day" job so I dont' have to spend the extra money in gas.. I go on my lunch hour. I too live in a rural town with one little grocery store and they get 4.00 for butter, etc...

tiggy2 Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 10:28pm
post #5 of 15

Fuel is expensive everywhere. Maybe it's time to increase your prices (if you're legal to sell cakes). If items are to expensive locally I don't know what other option you have. Guess you'll have to suck it up like the rest of us.

foxymomma521 Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 10:30pm
post #6 of 15

I order a ton of food from amazon. There's free delivery on a lot of items, and their prices are comparable to bjs for me on many items.

tryingcake Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 2:15am
post #7 of 15

I used to live like that (loved it!!). I went into town once a month to do my "real" shopping and shopped at the little local IGA for perishables that didn't last a month.

You simply have to stock up. Chocolate lasts forever. I'd buy tons of it at Costco or Sam's during the holidays in those big bags. Literally a year's worth. As long as you keep it at a constant steady room temp, it lasts a really long time.

Butter freezes well. Again, Costco, Sam's, places like that. Smart-and-Final actually has the best prices for me where I live now. Aldi's when I lived back east. I would buy several pounds at a time and freeze it. Eggs last awhile. I'd buy the 5 dozen container and they would last a good month.

You can buy tons of flour and sugar and it lasts forever as long as it's stored properly - or cakes mixes, whichever you prefer. Cake mixes typically have a two year shelf life. When those babies are on sale for 69 or 89 cents, I buy a cartful.

Even milk freezes well if you want it to. Or buy evaporated milk and use it instead in your cakes (I do that). Sits on the shelf for months.

You just have to not be afraid to stock up when you do make that 175 mile journey. Food costs what food costs. No one can help you there.

tiggy2 Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 2:29am
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tryingcake

I used to live like that (loved it!!). I went into town once a month to do my "real" shopping and shopped at the little local IGA for perishables that didn't last a month.

You simply have to stock up. Chocolate lasts forever. I'd buy tons of it at Costco or Sam's during the holidays in those big bags. Literally a year's worth. As long as you keep it at a constant steady room temp, it lasts a really long time.

Butter freezes well. Again, Costco, Sam's, places like that. Smart-and-Final actually has the best prices for me where I live now. Aldi's when I lived back east. I would buy several pounds at a time and freeze it. Eggs last awhile. I'd buy the 5 dozen container and they would last a good month.

You can buy tons of flour and sugar and it lasts forever as long as it's stored properly - or cakes mixes, whichever you prefer. Cake mixes typically have a two year shelf life. When those babies are on sale for 69 or 89 cents, I buy a cartful.

Even milk freezes well if you want it to. Or buy evaporated milk and use it instead in your cakes (I do that). Sits on the shelf for months.

You just have to not be afraid to stock up when you do make that 175 mile journey. Food costs what food costs. No one can help you there.



That's what I'm talking about!

Sorelle Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 2:40am
post #9 of 15

Thanks for the responses.
I bake free cakes for foster kids birthdays, a retirement home, service clubs, and family and friends so I don't have prices to raise.
But yeah, I think it's time to do the once a month shopping instead of once a week.
Im sure loving those prices at "Aldis" ! Texas is always doing right by the people (I used to live in Abilene)
I never new that Amazon sells food, thats something to check out.
I just don't want to have to cut back on baking, I do love it icon_smile.gif
Any other $ saving tips would be great to hear!

tryingcake Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 2:45am
post #10 of 15

Charge your family and friends at least cost. If you weren't making cakes, they'd be buying them at the local grocery - right? Charge at least that much and don't you dare feel bad! If you charge the $15 bucks that Costco charges (but your cake is better) - then you have covered your bare minimum cost and have a little left over to cover the cost of the freebies you give to charity.

Even when I'm feeling generous - I never charge less than what the local grocery store charges - heck - they'd be paying that anyway - right?

tiggy2 Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 2:50am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tryingcake

Charge your family and friends at least cost. If you weren't making cakes, they'd be buying them at the local grocery - right? Charge at least that much and don't you dare feel bad! If you charge the $15 bucks that Costco charges (but your cake is better) - then you have covered your bare minimum cost and have a little left over to cover the cost of the freebies you give to charity.

Even when I'm feeling generous - I never charge less than what the local grocery store charges - heck - they'd be paying that anyway - right?


That's fine as long as you don't get caught operating illegally.

Sorelle Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 2:57am
post #12 of 15

Yeah I think even if people just pay for the ingredients it is illegal, I wonder if THEY shop for ingredients and bring them to my home, I may get around this... hmmm anybody know this answer?

tryingcake Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 3:24am
post #13 of 15

No - you can not charge them at all - are your family and friends really gonna turn you in... really?

Yes, if they buy the ingredients and hand them to you - you are legal. If they buy the ingredients then you make it in their home and charge for your time, you are legal (that's a personal chef vs a baker or caterer and that's legal most places).

But really... your family would turn you in for charging them for ingredients only - not even utilities? WOW!

mrsbriggs06 Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 3:59am
post #14 of 15

the issue isn't so much your family/friend turning you in---
it's when your aunts sister gets a cake and serves it to the teacher who then wants a cake for her daughter's wedding-- the daughter that just so happens to be marrying the health inspector and oh boy they know just the lady to come to for cheap cake.

it's a snowball. even if it's 'just' a hobby right now, someone is going to ask you to make a cake for some function... and they'll offer to pay (even if it's too little).... and you'll need the money/practice/whatever and then someone at the party sees the cake & wants one...

i'm lucky to live in a state with cottage laws that i'm operating under until we finish reno work on the ground level of our tri-level home (that level will house my work space), but i speak as someone who has only advertised with word of mouth. i can easily book 2-3++ cakes each week if i were comfortable taking on that volume (I'm not-- as my 3 kids are my first job). I'm in my 2nd year of business (taxes, additional bank account, all that jazz) and just now printed up cards for those many friends who refer me. I don't solicit business but if i were operating illegally in a 'no home based kitchen' state, i'm sure i'd be up the creek with some hefty fines by now solely from word of mouth.

tryingcake Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 5:12am
post #15 of 15

Before I went legal I didn't get that far. I simply said no, I can't sell you a cake, I'm not legal. I only make them for my niece's birthday party, etc.....

So, I still say, "wow."

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