Guide Rings For Rolling Pin

Decorating By suzied Updated 30 Aug 2016 , 7:22pm by soldiernurse

 suzied  Cake Central Cake Decorator Profile
suzied Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 8:21am
post #1 of 11

Does anyone use the wilton guide rings to roll out fondant to cover a cake? The thickest is 3/16 which is slightly smaller than 1/4". or is there any other brand of guide rings that are better. Any tips on rolling out fondant evenly, please. thanks. is the correct thickness 1/4 inch??

10 replies
 solascakes  Cake Central Cake Decorator Profile
solascakes Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:10am
post #2 of 11

I have never used mine, they kept getting in the way, they are useless.

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HamSquad Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:57am
post #3 of 11

Has anyone ever tried this rolling pin before? I just saw this in an article in the newspaper yesterday. This seems to do the same thing as the wilton rings for the rolling pin. HTH
www.williams-sonoma.com/products/joseph-joseph-adjustable-rolling-pin/?pkey=e|rolling%2Bpin|10|best|0|1|24||1&cm_src=PRODUCTSEARC

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Elcee Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 1:59pm
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by solascakes

I have never used mine, they kept getting in the way, they are useless.




I agree, hated them, too. When rolling out the fondant I couldn't always keep it in between the guides and so would end up with "track marks" and have to start over!

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bobwonderbuns Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 2:08pm
post #5 of 11

Save yourself some money, use two wooden yardsticks if you have to have a guide. Personally I just eyeball it and call it a day.

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lilscakes Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 2:16pm
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Save yourself some money, use two wooden yardsticks if you have to have a guide. Personally I just eyeball it and call it a day.




Excellent idea bobwonderbuns! Thanks for the tip. sometimes it's the simple things that make you say "why didn't I think of that?" icon_biggrin.gif

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leah_s Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 2:24pm
post #7 of 11

Of course I didn't buy the W brand rings, but I have a set and use them often. For rolling out cookie dough and fondant pieces that are too big to go thru the pasta machine or that I want thicker than the widest setting on the fondant machine. I really like them.

In culinary school the guides, aka yardsticks (my set are stainless steel) are called "candy bars." They are mostly used for getting a molten candy to a uniform depth before cutting.

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bcarb Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 2:25pm
post #8 of 11

Oh Bobwonderbuns, you have my interest. Can you take a minute to explain how you would use 2 yardsticks, unless you just meant to manually measure the width at times with a ruler.
Thanks agiain for everyone's time.

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bobwonderbuns Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 2:41pm
post #9 of 11

Well there's really nothing to it, just put a yardstick on either side and use those as the guides to rest the rolling pin on. The average yardstick is probably a touch less than 1/4 inch thick, which is good for fondant. (You can roll it thinner if you need to.) If you are wondering how to gauge thickness of fondant without a gauge, remember 1/4 inch is two nickles on top of each other, 1/8 inch is two dimes in top of each other. That will help you to eyeball it.

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bcarb Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 3:04pm
post #10 of 11

Bobwonderbuns, thank you for the explaination, I was way off in my thinking. icon_lol.gif

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soldiernurse Posted 30 Aug 2016 , 7:22pm
post #11 of 11


Quote by @bobwonderbuns on 11 Feb 2011 , 6:41am

Well there's really nothing to it, just put a yardstick on either side and use those as the guides to rest the rolling pin on. The average yardstick is probably a touch less than 1/4 inch thick, which is good for fondant. (You can roll it thinner if you need to.) If you are wondering how to gauge thickness of fondant without a gauge, remember 1/4 inch is two nickles on top of each other, 1/8 inch is two dimes in top of each other. That will help you to eyeball it.


Thx!! this was REALLY helpful!! as usual!!


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