Wilton Candy Colors Made Chocolate Sieze, Anyone Else?

Decorating By SugarandSpice3674 Updated 17 Feb 2011 , 4:11am by platinumlady

SugarandSpice3674 Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 7:18am
post #1 of 24

I am making a chocolate plaque for a cake, and wanted to use white choc not candy melts, so i got the wilton candy colors and when it came time add it in, I noticed it was changing the texture of the chocolate, I did everything i could to avoid seizing, made sure there was no water near the choc,didnt over heat it as i was using a double boiler, so i tried it again with a new batch of chocolate, with a different color and sure enough, it siezed again, I thought they werent supposed to that since they are oil based, any thoughts on this? could i have done something wrong? i might have to breakdown and get some colored candy melts........and start over icon_sad.gif

23 replies
motherofgrace Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 7:32am
post #2 of 24

Happens to me as well. I add some olive oil, and it helps.

ToniRod Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 8:16am
post #3 of 24

I've had the same problem with the Wilton that I had bought at Michaels. I gave up on it and purchased some Merckens candy melts instead at my local cake supply store. The lady at the cake supply told me that when the Wilton's gets old (if it has been sitting on the shelf for a while at the store) it will tends to do that. I personally think the Merkens tastes better anyhow. HTH

motherofgrace Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 8:30am
post #4 of 24

But candy melts are not real chocolate right? Im just wondering, cuz i can tast ethe difference between candy melts adn white chocolate

ToniRod Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:09am
post #5 of 24

Hmmm... Good question. I'd be interested to know that myself. It's been a while since we used it, and the thought didn't even occur to me that it wasn't real chocolate. I told everyone it was chocolate... Lol. The one thing I could tell you though from what I remember, is the Merkens tasted far superior to the Wilton's in my estimation, and it was easy to work with as well.

indydebi Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 3:30pm
post #6 of 24

Assuming the colors were nto water based, the chocolate may have been old.

SugarandSpice3674 Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 3:43pm
post #7 of 24

well i was using real white chocolate, not candy melts, but i never considered that the choc could be too old, i just bought it, but who knows how long it sat on the shelf lol. i dont have any extra time to c if it happens again so I'm going to use the colored candy melts, good thing i decided to start early ! Thanks for ur advise icon_smile.gif

cheatize Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 4:55pm
post #8 of 24

Did you add a spoon of shortening when it seized?

cheatize Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 4:57pm
post #9 of 24

Did you add a spoon of shortening when it seized?

cheatize Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 4:58pm
post #10 of 24

Did you add a spoon of shortening when it seized?

cheatize Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 4:58pm
post #11 of 24

Did you add a spoon of shortening when it seized?

cheatize Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 4:59pm
post #12 of 24

Did you add a spoon of shortening when it seized?

SugarandSpice3674 Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 6:12pm
post #13 of 24

no i didnt try that,but will definitly next time, thanks! icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:35pm
post #14 of 24

You CAN overheat chocolate in a double boiler and you CAN get condensation from the double boiler into the chocolate without even realizing it.

I find that melting chocolate in the micowave in a plastic microwave safe bowl at 50% power--or less-- works very well.

If using a double boiler, the top pot/bowl MUST be an extremely tight fit to the bottom pot. If you get the water to boiling and then add the top pot with the chocolate, it decreases the amount of steam and is very gentle to the chocolate.

As for adding in candy colors, I'd suggest gently warming them in warm water (place bottle of color in a zip loc bag and put that in warm water) or in a heating pad on low before adding it to the warm chocolate. If trying to make a very dark color, no matter how hard you try, it may affect the quality of the chocolate. Colored cocoa butters work better for darker colors.

If you add shortening or oil, the chocolate will not set up as shiny & hard as it would without the addition of the soft fat.

Rae

shanter Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:56pm
post #15 of 24

Proprietor at my cake store said food coloring for chocolate has to be oil-based. It is different from the paste colors you use to color royal icing, buttercream, cakes, etc., or the grocery store ones. I didn't ask about melted chocolate and powdered colors.
Shanter

BlakesCakes Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 10:03pm
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

Proprietor at my cake store said food coloring for chocolate has to be oil-based. It is different from the paste colors you use to color royal icing, buttercream, cakes, etc., or the grocery store ones. I didn't ask about melted chocolate and powdered colors.
Shanter




Right. And as OP stated, she was using Wilton Candy Colors--oil based colors.

You can use powdered colors. That is how I color cocoa butter for painting. You can also melt colored candy melts and mix them with white chocolate, but obviously, the colors won't be intense.

Rae

SugarandSpice3674 Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 3:59am
post #17 of 24

I really appreciate all the input, i took another try, using both candy melts and white chocolate with the candy colors, i added some shortening and they didnt sieze! may not be as shiny, but worked great, Yay! made my night! LOL thumbs_up.gif

cheatize Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 4:34am
post #18 of 24

Yup. I haven't noticed a difference in the shine but that's probably because I've never seen them side by side. When I'm at the seizing point, or when it jut isn't thin enough, my only option has been to add shortening. I did pick up some cocoa butter a few weeks back but I can't remember why. Blakescakes: can I add that to chocolate to keep it at consistency? Is that why I bought it?

BlakesCakes Posted 12 Feb 2011 , 10:59am
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

. Blakescakes: can I add that to chocolate to keep it at consistency? Is that why I bought it?




With real chocolate, you need to temper the cocoa butter before adding it. That can be a pain.

With candy melts and with real chocolate, you can add paramount crystals without having to temper them. This gives a thinner pouring product, but one that will firm up and shine properly, too.

Rae

cheatize Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 1:05am
post #20 of 24

I've tried the Paramount crystals before and they never dissolved. I had to throw the whole batch out. Are there specific instructions for adding it?

cabecakes Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 1:38am
post #21 of 24

I don't like Wilton's Candy Melts. I'd much rather use Merckens or real Chocolate. I don't care for the taste of the Candy Melts.

Uniqueask Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 2:17am
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

I've tried the Paramount crystals before and they never dissolved. I had to throw the whole batch out. Are there specific instructions for adding it?




I have never had a problem with Paramount Crystals not melting, you have to stir for a while, or maybe you got a bad batch, if there is such thing as a bad batch of Paramount Crystals.

BlakesCakes Posted 14 Feb 2011 , 1:01am
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uniqueask


I have never had a problem with Paramount Crystals not melting, you have to stir for a while, or maybe you got a bad batch, if there is such thing as a bad batch of Paramount Crystals.




They're basically solid palm kernel oil. I don't see how they could go bad and they melt at aroun 80 degrees, so if the chocolate is melted, stirring them into it should melt them, too...........

Rae

platinumlady Posted 17 Feb 2011 , 4:11am
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarandSpice3674

I did everything i could to avoid seizing,




I just started using candy melts for decorations...What is Seizing? ... I'm still learning as you can tell

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