Charging Per Slice Or Per Cake?

Decorating By SSGirly Updated 13 Feb 2011 , 5:40pm by AmysCakesNCandies

SSGirly Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 6:50pm
post #1 of 19

Which do you do?

If you charge per slice, what do you charge?

If you charge per cake, what percentage or how much over your materials costs? (ie: materials cost $50 and you charge $100)

18 replies
sari66 Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 6:54pm
post #2 of 19

I charge per slice as do probably most businesses. As for what to charge call around to bakeries in your area to find a starting point.

hth

FromScratchSF Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 6:54pm
post #3 of 19

Hello!

You should probably start with doing the homework in your area as to what others charge per cake, but it's most likely based on a cost per slice based on their overhead/labor/ingredients. You have to figure your cost of ingredients plus labor/overhead, nobody else can tell you that.

There are a ton of threads on hereabout pricing, do a search and read up on what others have said about this.

Good luck,

jen

SSGirly Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 6:57pm
post #4 of 19

I'm not looking for myself... i'm just wondering what others do. I see a lot of people asking what cakes cost...

TexasSugar Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 7:01pm
post #5 of 19

Those numbers really should be the same.

If you sell an 8in cake for $72 then that would be $3 per serving, you get 24 servings from that size cake.

Have you seen this post about pricing?

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-694973.html

Your per serving/per cake price should be based off of your cost, labor and profit. Not just from pulling numbers out of the air, like bakery A charges $2.75 so that's what I'll charge.

Tclanton Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 7:25pm
post #6 of 19

Sugar - I am confused - my chart says an 8" will only serve 15. Could my chart be inaccurate?

TexasSugar Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 7:28pm
post #7 of 19
Tclanton Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 7:41pm
post #8 of 19

I see the difference - size of portion being served. Thanks for the link, I will print it out for reference as well. The one I have now is Earlene's Cake Serving chart. I am sure you may have run across it on here as well.

leily Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 8:21pm
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tclanton

I see the difference - size of portion being served. Thanks for the link, I will print it out for reference as well. The one I have now is Earlene's Cake Serving chart. I am sure you may have run across it on here as well.




If you use Earlene's chart then you're price per serving should be higher than someone using the wilton chart so the cakes end up costing the same (assuming all of your cost and their cost, plus your skill levels are equal) The wilton chart is industry standard though and even cake civilians tend to cut slices that size even though when they hear the numbers they think they're too small

Tclanton Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 8:40pm
post #10 of 19

Thank you Leily!!

Renaejrk Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 8:51pm
post #11 of 19

An actual serving is 8 cubic inches - 1x2x4, 2x2x2, etc.

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:24pm
post #12 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:25pm
post #13 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:26pm
post #14 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:27pm
post #15 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:28pm
post #16 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:29pm
post #17 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

indydebi Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 9:30pm
post #18 of 19

charging per slice or per cake is just a matter of semantics. A 10" square serves 50. I can charge $3/slice (50 x $3 = $150), or I can charge $150 for the cake ($150 divided by 50 servings = $3/serving).

charging by the cake means you've already done the math and computed it out to a per-cake price.

Having a per-serving price guideline allows you to quickly calculate an approximate cost. In 2.7 seconds you can tell someone how much a cake for 168 people will cost without having to stop and calculate what size cakes you'lll use.

its just semantics

AmysCakesNCandies Posted 13 Feb 2011 , 5:40pm
post #19 of 19

I charge by the cake, but as most have said it all breaks down the same. I only choose to charge by the cake because I find people are somewhat confused by the per slice price... "So if it $4 a slice then how much will it cost me to serve 100?" seriously, I've been asked that. Basic math, but some people just don't get it, so two years ago I switched to per cake.

Since I am not there to cut the cake, I can hope but can't guarantee that they will get exactly the number of slices they ordered. When I did full scale catering this wasn't a problem, but now that I just do cakes, the potential is there. So I also like the per cake pricing because then I can tell my customers the cake will serve a range rather than a specific number, just in case its not cut properly and they end up short a few slices.

But as IndyDebi said.. Its all semantics 6 of one, half dozen of another. Its just what your comfortable with.

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