*5 Tier Delivery Question*

Decorating By aptarpley Updated 11 Feb 2011 , 9:15pm by cambo

aptarpley Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 12:24am
post #1 of 12

I have delivered 3 and 4 tier cakes already stacked with no problems, this will be my first 5 tier cake for my grandparent's big 50th wedding anniversary celebration. We have the venue booked for the entire day so I was wondering if it would be better to take the tiers seperate and stack them when I get there since there will be plenty of time? Any help or advise would be greatly appreciated! It's a pretty big day for them and I really don't want to mess this up!!!! Thank you!!

11 replies
ConfectionsCC Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 12:31am
post #2 of 12

I am gearin up to do my first 5 tier as well! I am way to scared to deliver it stacked, so I am sacking the top two tiers, the bottom two tiers, and leaving the middle tier; so delivering in 3 pieces! I opted to do it this way 1, to cut down on stacking time at the site, 2. The middle tier will have fruit filling, so I am keeping it in the fridge as long as possible, and holding it in the car because I am afraid of it slipping! Good luck with your delivery! I am anxious to see how others would do it!

princess_09 Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 12:32am
post #3 of 12

If there is plenty of time to stack them when you get there, then I would wait until then. If you think you might be short on time you could stack the first 3 tiers and add the last two when you get there. Hope that helps!

Crazboutcakes Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 12:35am
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by princess_09

If there is plenty of time to stack them when you get there, then I would wait until then. If you think you might be short on time you could stack the first 3 tiers and add the last two when you get there. Hope that helps!




that would be my plan icon_biggrin.gif

cambo Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 12:43am
post #5 of 12

I use my homemade flange/pipe system and "thread" my cakes down over the center pvc pipe so I can literally just drop it off and go! Of course, each tier has individual supports also! This is the same method so many celebrity cake designers use that you see on tv! I also use 1/2" foamcore as my cakeboard (thanks Sharon)! Once I started using this method I've never looked back! Saves me loads of "on-site assembly" time and is 99.9% fail-safe (unless I drop the cake)! Now, a 5-tier is one heavy sucker, but I've done it in very large tiers....just had a helper to lift it! Good luck whichever way you choose to deliver/assemble!

gbbaker Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 1:01am
post #6 of 12

I stack and dowel the bottom 3 tiers and stack and dowel the top 2 tiers and put one dowel through all 5 tiers.

emiyeric Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 1:26am
post #7 of 12

While I have only done a 4-tier cake and never a 5, SPS is something a lot of people swear by. Super secure, easy to use, cheap ... the only thing is that you do have to order it ahead of time. PM Leahs if you have any questions ... she's fantastic, super helpful, has a well-established business with gorgeous cakes, and is the #1 advocate of SPS on this site icon_wink.gif. HTH!

aptarpley Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 2:14pm
post #8 of 12

Thank you all for the suggestions!!!! I really appreciate the help!!!

leily Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 2:42pm
post #9 of 12

if you're stacking 5 tiers make sure you have someone there to help you carry it. I know that i could not carry a cake that large all assembled by myself.

leah_s Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 3:30pm
post #10 of 12

Thanks! And yes, SPS can handle a five tier no problem. I personally can't lift a five tier even with DH's help (bad back) so I'd have to deliver in pieces. But if you can lift it, SPS can support it!

Niki11784 Posted 10 Feb 2011 , 3:59pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cambo

I use my homemade flange/pipe system and "thread" my cakes down over the center pvc pipe so I can literally just drop it off and go!




What is that?

cambo Posted 11 Feb 2011 , 9:15pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niki11784

Quote:
Originally Posted by cambo

I use my homemade flange/pipe system and "thread" my cakes down over the center pvc pipe so I can literally just drop it off and go!



What is that?




It's just a "1-pole" support system that is adhered to your cakeboard (plywood) using a plumbing flange, then you use plumbing couplers (pvc connectors) to secure your PVC (food safe) pole to the flange! VERY inexpensive parts, and once you make sure your cake circles (I use foamboard) have circles cut in the centers, you simply thread the cakes down over the PVC tube (I think my PVC pipe is 1") and there is NO way the cake can fall unless you drop it! Keep in mind that you will still need to use supports for each tier (I use bubble tea straws), but you can have those added before threading the pipe! Once you thread them all, add your borders and you can safely delivery in one piece! I literally just place the cake on the table, take a picture and I'm DONE!

This method is wonderful during the busy season and I can manage to deliver multiple cakes and save lots of time!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%