lisa_mae Posted 1 Feb 2011 , 11:29pm
post #1 of

Does anyone have a cake recipe for some one who cant have dairy, soy, gluten, or corn?

27 replies
tryingcake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 1:41am
post #2 of

stay away from cake.

I know I sound rude, but I don't understand people looking for cake recipes that make a cake not a cake any longer.

You sooooooo did not ask for my opinion but this is a subject that burns my craw because my children had MANY dietary restrictions growing up, including milk.

If you are diabetic: no sugar = no cake
can't eat gluten = no cake

my 2 sons couldn't eat red dye growing up - so nothing with red die which was a lot back then. I just taught them if you can't eat it - simply don't eat it - and don't look for substitutes. You can't eat it - accept it. Drive on. Life's too short.

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 2:02am
post #3 of

I must respectfully disagree with the above poster. I am a gluten free baker - having started my cake business before finding out I needed to stop eating gluten, I changed my entire business over to gluten free cakes and goodies - including many vegan and allergy friendly choices. There are lots of delicious options out there.

Can you give me an idea OP, are you needing a cake that stacks and can be decorated, or more of a dessert cake, like a flourless chocolate torte? Let me know what you're looking for and I'll see if I can help you out.

Kitagrl Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 2:22am
post #4 of

I disagree respectfully as well...nothing wrong with baking a cake for a child who usually cannot eat cake!!!

I have a nephew allergic to wheat, eggs, soy, and nuts and mild dairy and if I lived closer, I'd really work on baking whatever I could for him!!! People with severe allergies go through a lot!

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 2:30am
post #5 of

OP, Here's one route you can take if you want to avoid buying a bunch of products (gf cakes take a few different flours to get your flavor and texture profile right, so you'll have to buy a few things you may not end up using up if you go the from scratch route). Namaste foods offers a vanilla cake mix, chocolate cake mix, and spice cake mix (which is easily made into a carrot cake). http://www.namastefoods.com/products/cgi-bin/products.cgi?Category_Id=4

I tried their spice cake mix made as a carrot cake before I attempted my own scratch cakes so I could compare mine with products on the market. It was quite good - good texture, lovely flavor, but baked up fairly flat (probably because of the lack of baking powder - most baking powders have corn starch in them).

I'd go this route if you're not a gluten free baker - partly because it'll save you buying the myriad of ingredients, and partly because you'll avoid cross contamination (i.e. if you've ever scooped a tbsp of another of your ingredients, like sugar, etc. after having used the same spoon for flour - the sugar, etc. would be contaminated. I encourage you to do some research on how to avoid cross contamination as it is extremely important in keeping a gluten/corn/etc. intolerant person safe and healthy. I know I react very severely to even trace amounts of gluten. So, clean everything very well ahead of time, wipe down your countertops, all parts of your mixer, re-wash your cake pans and get into the corners, use silicone spatulas (not wooden spoons as they can hold gluten in the crevices)....a.k.a. - super-clean everything icon_smile.gif There's lots of information online about baking safe allergy friendly foods - so research a little first so you keep your client safe.

It looks like Namaste also carries a frosting mix, but you can also make safe frosting just using crisco or palm oil, and subbing coconut milk or water for any milk. Do double check any flavorings (vanilla extract, etc.) to be sure they are safe.

I hope that helps!

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 2:41am
post #6 of

Also, don't sub margarine for butter in icing unless it's labeled dairy free...most margarines have some dairy/casein. Earth Balance buttery sticks do not have dairy, but probably have soy. I'd just use palm oil shortening to avoid hassle.

tania9 Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 2:54am
post #7 of

Sounds a lot like me, I have to cut out so many foods it feels like there aren't many left.

If you like baking from scratch, this is a great recipe
http://melangerbaking.com/2010/08/26/gluten-free-dairy-free-orange-almond-cake/
I substituted the oranges for lemons.

Almond meal makes a beautiful cake and nut butters are beautiful. My daughter made me some almond cookies using almond meal and macadamia nut butter, they were honestly the best cookies I've ever had! Nut butters are easy to make yourself and there's videos on youtube to show you how.

The reason there are substitutes is so that everyone can enjoy all foods, so please make them a cake icon_smile.gif

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 3:06am
post #8 of

I know what you mean icon_smile.gif We're gluten free, my husband is dairy free, pork free, and tomato free right now lol.

That recipe looks lovely! OP would just need to buy special corn-free baking powder (they do make it - it has potato starch instead of corn starch). I bet you can find it online.

tania9 Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 3:25am
post #9 of

oops.. knew I forgot something.. it's so hot here, not thinking icon_smile.gif

Gluten Free Homemade Baking Powder

Cream of tartar:2 parts

Baking Soda:1 part

potato flour :1 part

sift together keep in an airtight container keeps for 24months

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 3:30am

Awesome! Is it potato flour, or potato starch?

tania9 Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 3:34am

we have potato flour in our health food shops..
I found this

POTATO FLOUR:
Potato flour is made from cooked, dried, and ground potatoes. It is used as an ingredient in potato based recipes to enhance the potato flavor and is often mixed with other types of flour for baking breads and rolls. It is also used as a thickener for soups, gravies, and sauces. Potato flour is often confused with potato starch, but potato flour is produced from the entire dehydrated potato whereas potato starch is produced from the starch only

I made a cake with potato flour, and it was unbelievable, and I have absolutely no idea where that recipe could be, all I know is that I made it in 1994 lol

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 3:46am

I just looked up a couple recipes for the corn free baking powder - they all say potato starch (as opposed to potato flour) ....I think the flour would be much too heavy for that purpose.

I'll have to try your above recipe....I bought 25 pounds of almond flour a while ago and need to use it up! I think I've only used a third of it!

tania9 Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 3:53am

Maybe they work the same in the baking powder?

make some cookies too, my 16 yr old daughter was baking choc chip cookies (i'm not allowed chocolate either) she didn't want me to miss out, so she came up with a recipe for some cookies and wow, honestly try some macadamia nut butter as a dairy/soy substitute, it's amazing!

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 4:04am

Just thinking about confectioner's sugar too...it usually has cornstarch in it. I'd buy the Namaste mix to make that easy too....unless you can make your own powdered sugar with another kind of starch

tania9 Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 4:17am

not sure about that one because we have packets of 'pure icing sugar' which is powdered sugar but nothing added. Easy enough to make, just blend sugar til suuuuuper fine

Oh no I just realised that I can't have IMBC anymore (the food thing has only been a month) I think i'll go cry now icon_sad.gif

tryingcake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 4:19am

Why are people so afraid of their kids missing out? Everyone is not created the same. We really aren't. There are so many other wonderful things out there to enjoy. I stand by the fact that I taught my kids to accept what issues they may have and enjoy life anyway. I just don't get it. I never will. There are things I can't eat- so I don't. Cake-free recipes don't taste a thing like cake. So why are we pretending they do? Isn't better to teach kids reality? We are not all the same and we all have different limitations and handicaps. Every last one of us. Why should my kids feel they have to be the same as everyone else or feel left out? There are things they can do but others can't. Should those other kids feel left out?

I can't eat lettuce - there is no substitute for lettuce. Does this mean I'm missing out?

I taught my kids this so they would never make a mistake and eat the wrongs foods because they all look alike. For my youngest son especially eating the wrong things can mean death. Sooooo not worth the risk for me. We can not watch every move our kids make. I wanted them to be well trained by the time they were old enough to be out of my site and making decisions. By then I wanted it to be habit to refuse these foods and not feel like they are missing out.

But I'm always the underdog in this conversation and I actually accept that. My grown kids are well adjusted but according to many others they supposedly missed out on candy and caffeine and such their entire childhoods. Even though they were taught to be happy with other treats and actually are happy and don't feel lacking.

I just don't understand.

OH, and I would do anything for my kids, too. Including keeping them safe. Cake is a luxery. It's required in life to be happy.

tania9 Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 4:43am
Quote:
Originally Posted by tryingcake

Why are people so afraid of their kids missing out? Everyone is not created the same. We really aren't. There are so many other wonderful things out there to enjoy. I stand by the fact that I taught my kids to accept what issues they may have and enjoy life anyway. I just don't get it. I never will. There are things I can't eat- so I don't. Cake-free recipes don't taste a thing like cake. So why are we pretending they do? Isn't better to teach kids reality? We are not all the same and we all have different limitations and handicaps. Every last one of us. Why should my kids feel they have to be the same as everyone else or feel left out? There are things they can do but others can't. Should those other kids feel left out?

I can't eat lettuce - there is no substitute for lettuce. Does this mean I'm missing out?

I taught my kids this so they would never make a mistake and eat the wrongs foods because they all look alike. For my youngest son especially eating the wrong things can mean death. Sooooo not worth the risk for me. We can not watch every move our kids make. I wanted them to be well trained by the time they were old enough to be out of my site and making decisions. By then I wanted it to be habit to refuse these foods and not feel like they are missing out.

But I'm always the underdog in this conversation and I actually accept that. My grown kids are well adjusted but according to many others they supposedly missed out on candy and caffeine and such their entire childhoods. Even though they were taught to be happy with other treats and actually are happy and don't feel lacking.

I just don't understand.

OH, and I would do anything for my kids, too. Including keeping them safe. Cake is a luxery. It's required in life to be happy.




What or who realistically defines 'cake'? There are hundreds of different kinds of chocolate cakes .. flourless, German chocolate, Mudcake, chocolate fluff sponges etc etc etc, there is no one flavour or texture.
So why can't gluten free/dairy free etc, be a different kind of cake? why can't it be one of the "many other wonderful things out there to enjoy" ? I was a cake-o-holic and I have been VERY impressed with the cakes I have been able to eat now.
I am honestly very happy that the way you raised your children worked for you, but it's not for everyone. Not everyone is told that they have food intolerances/allergies when they are young and it can be hard. Eg me, I'm 38 and I finally found out a month ago what I shouldn't eat, and my list of foods that I can eat, from ALL food groups now fits on less than an A4 piece of paper, and I used to eat EVERYTHING. So for now I need substitutes otherwise I'll feel like I am eating the same things over and over.
You're right, cake is a luxury and everyone deserves a slice (of a cake they are able to eat) if they want icon_smile.gif

MJoycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 12:01pm

Tryingcake, I don't mean this with any disrespect - I know there are people who feel the way you do....I'm not one of them icon_smile.gif

The cakes that I make are gluten free....there are many alternate flours in this world...tapioca, sorghum, white rice, brown rice, sweet rice, millet, almond flour, potato flour/starches. Baked goods can be made with many combinations of these flours. In changing my business over, I learned that though many of us believe(d) that cakes are limited to being made with wheat flour, that it just isn't true - delicious cakes can be made with no wheat flour and they are just as tasty as the wheat flour version. When you say "Cake-free recipes don't taste a thing like cake" - these recipes are nothing close to cake-free, they just happen to be wheat free....gluten is not what makes a cake a cake. I have served my GF cakes to friends, neighbors, and strangers alike who raved about the cakes and had no idea they were gluten free and in many cases, dairy free.

In terms of children, my youngest, who is not yet 3 is gluten intolerant, and is allergic to oats (even GF oats). We're having her tested soon for more foods as she gets rashes on her face when she eats a few other foods. She, at two, already knows that there are differences in baked goods. She talks a lot about "gluten free" and already knows to ask whether something is safe for her to eat before she eats anything outside of our home (everything at home is safe for her). Now, granted, and thankfully, she doesn't have any allergy that would cause anaphylaxis....I'm sure I would feel differently about certain things if that were the case.

I guess my point in responding is to suggest that you reconsider making blanket statements about gluten free/allergy free cakes not tasting like cake. I have lots of folks who would attest quite the opposite icon_smile.gif

chezzajd Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 1:54pm

my niece has galactosemia, no dairy no gluten, i think oh god how am i going to do her birthday cake, the answer came from her mum we went through what she could eat and the only think we had to change was the butter, for dairy free, and it didnt taste any different, its amazing the amount of substatutes out there,
it was a lot of checking packaging labels on products and me calling in a blind panic to double check, my niece was alowed it, but overall seeing her have a 1st birthday cake just like everyone else was worth it all.

elliespartycake Posted 2 Feb 2011 , 2:39pm

One of the best books on the subject of gluten free baking is called Easy Gluten-Free Baking by Elizabeth Barbone. It has some amazing recipes and she spends the first part of the book talking about all of the GF ingredients she uses in her recipes. My daughter is GF and I have found that many of the recipes are fantastic...can't tell they are GF. I highly recommend the chocolate cake, Rosie's perfect pumpkin bread, white sandwich bread.
Your library may have a copy so you can test bake from it and it is available on Amazon for much less than it's $24.95 price tag.

chimom Posted 15 Feb 2014 , 11:22am

I know this is a super old post, but thought I'd share a recipe for anyone else who might be searching. I usually bake dairy/egg/nut-free due to family allergies, with good success. It certainly is a challenge to add gluten to the list of allergens, though! Having two different friends'  kids with these allergies PLUS allergies to soy and wheat, I couldn't resist the challenge to bless them. :) This recipe has gotten the thumbs up from both kids, as well as the mom (who has no allergies, but has tasted many allergy-free foods). I bake as a hobby, and am not a professional baker by any means. But hopefully this recipe can help someone (since I probably couldn't contribute much knowledge otherwise)!

 

 

Dairy/Gluten/Egg/Soy-free Chocolate Cake

Yield: Makes one 9" round cake, or about 14 cupcakes.

 

Ingredients:

1.5 cups of GF flour (I make my own combination by weight: 84g brown rice flour + 63g white rice flour + 63g potato starch)

1 tsp xanthan gum

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup (or 4 Tbsp) unsweetened cocoa powder

2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

5 Tbsp canola oil

1 Tbsp vinegar

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 cup water

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. If making cupcakes, I recommend using foil liners, otherwise the paper ones get pretty greasy.

2. Whisk together dry ingredients (first 6 ingredients listed).

3. Add oil, vinegar and vanilla. Mix to thoroughly moisten. Mixture will be crumbly.

4. Add water and mix to combine/incorporate.

5. Bake in prepared 9" round pan for about 35 minutes, when center looks set (not so shiny) and springs back at slight touch (or at least doesn't sink). I didn't feel that the toothpick test was quite as reliable, since it may come out clean but still be too moist/pasty in the middle.

 

Cake is still more dense, but is decent. I haven't played around with other flours to see if I could get a better crumb. If I do one day, I'll let you know!

 

Incidentally, many people with soy allergies can have soybean oil and soy lecithin. It is helpful to know if this is the case (best to check with their doctor of course). But it's a huge game changer if they can! My friend thought her daughter had to avoid all soybean oil, and did that painfully for years until I questioned her about it. She checked with the doc, and they got the thumbs up on soybean oil & soy lecithin! So... I also bake with Fleischmann's UNSALTED margarine sticks without any issue for both my friends' children... AND, at the risk of sounding sacrelig on a cake forum, this also opens the door for using Pillsbury tub frosting:-X (most flavors are okay, even the "milk chocolate" one)!

chimom Posted 15 Feb 2014 , 11:45am

Hmmm... I make my GF flour based on 140g per 1 cup as on glutenfreegirl's site. However, I just read on joyofbaking that 130g flour = 1 cup. So... just FYI for anyone trying out the recipe posted above.

auzzi Posted 16 Feb 2014 , 12:48am

Quote:

joyofbaking that 130g flour = 1 cup

 

 

True .. but .. that is wheat flour not gluten-free flours or starches

 

* brown rice flour    1 US cup = 130-135g depending on the grind
* white rice flour     1 US cup = 160g depending on the source [asian, indian, commercial]
* potato starch       1 US cup = 165g

 

thus based on the weights above:

 

0.64 cup + 0.39 cup + 0.38 = 1.4 cups - slightly less than chimon's 1 1/2 cups ...

chimom Posted 16 Feb 2014 , 3:26am

Wow, thanks for the clarification! I have much to learn indeed. I was going by glutenfreegirl's recommendation for 1 cup of GF flour = 140g, with that weight having a ratio of 40% whole grain flour to 60% white flour/starches: http://glutenfreegirl.com/2012/07/how-to-make-a-gluten-free-all-purpose-flour-mix/ . Her whole point was to go off of 140g = 1 cup GF flour, but play around and use different types of flours. As long as you stick with a 40/60 ratio, you should be good.

 

However... you made me realize just now that I got my ratio BACKWARDS all this time! :duh:  Duh... I made a chart long ago and have been using that chart, not realizing that I made a 60/40 ratio of whole grain/white starch instead of 40/60... makes me curious to try it the suggested way and see how that is different...

 

So perhaps this won't be helpful to anyone after all, but who knows, maybe it will help the one random person years down the road...

 

Based on the 40/60 ratio from glutenfreegirl's recommended 140g, that would make:

* brown rice flour = 56g

* white rice flour = 42g

* potato starch = 42g, making a total of 140g

 

Or, 40/60 ratio based on Auzzi's weights would make:

* brown rice flour = 0.40 cup x 135g = 54g

* white rice flour = 0.30 cup x 160g = 48g

* potato starch = 0.30 cup x 165g = 49.5g, making a total of 151.5g

 

Humbly learning here! Appreciate all the knowledge and experience so graciously shared on this site!

chimom Posted 16 Feb 2014 , 3:33am

Holy toledo, someone shoot me now. I'm losing my mind and can't think straight. I did have the ratios right... assuming 1 cup = 140g per glutenfreegirl, 1.5 cups = 210g, and 40% of that = 84g brown rice as originallys tated.

 

Since these posts are being moderated, feel free to just delete my last reply (pending) and including this one! I should probably just crawl back into my little cave and just let the experts talk! So sorry!!! I'm making such a mess about something very few people probably have interest in...

dilikestobake Posted 16 Feb 2014 , 1:42pm

Google Paleo Cakes, and you'll find recipes for sure. On a paleo diet, you can't have grains, dairy, legumes, sugar...so most recipes are gluten and dairy free. Just make sure to look at the ingredients just in case

MsGF Posted 16 Feb 2014 , 2:41pm

I strictly bake Gluten-Free and make accommodations for  Dairy/Lactose Free, Egg-Free, Grain-Free, Soy-Free and Corn Free.  All are possible and make very yummy cakes.  If they weren't yummy I wouldn't sell them.

 

Here are 2 recipes sites with very good  allergy friendly recipes:

 

http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.ca/2009/09/gluten-free-cake-cupcake-recipes.html

 

 http://www.thesensitivepantry.com/recipes/

 

Be VERY careful of cross-contamination when baking for people with sensitivities, allergies and Celiac.

 

Have fun.

 

MsGF

Eachna Posted 27 Feb 2014 , 1:43am

Quote:

Originally Posted by tryingcake 

Why are people so afraid of their kids missing out? Everyone is not created the same. We really aren't. There are so many other wonderful things out there to enjoy. I stand by the fact that I taught my kids to accept what issues they may have and enjoy life anyway. I just don't get it. I never will. There are things I can't eat- so I don't. Cake-free recipes don't taste a thing like cake. So why are we pretending they do? Isn't better to teach kids reality? We are not all the same and we all have different limitations and handicaps. Every last one of us. Why should my kids feel they have to be the same as everyone else or feel left out? There are things they can do but others can't. Should those other kids feel left out?

I can't eat lettuce - there is no substitute for lettuce. Does this mean I'm missing out?

I taught my kids this so they would never make a mistake and eat the wrongs foods because they all look alike. For my youngest son especially eating the wrong things can mean death. Sooooo not worth the risk for me. We can not watch every move our kids make. I wanted them to be well trained by the time they were old enough to be out of my site and making decisions. By then I wanted it to be habit to refuse these foods and not feel like they are missing out.

But I'm always the underdog in this conversation and I actually accept that. My grown kids are well adjusted but according to many others they supposedly missed out on candy and caffeine and such their entire childhoods. Even though they were taught to be happy with other treats and actually are happy and don't feel lacking.

I just don't understand.

OH, and I would do anything for my kids, too. Including keeping them safe. Cake is a luxery. It's required in life to be happy.

 

Did you mean to say cake is a luxury and it's _not_ required to be happy in life?

 

You're allergic to lettuce, does that mean you don't eat anything with a leaf? Can you eat field greens (and if you can, do you)?

 

If you do eat field greens (or something else leafy)...why? You're allergic to lettuce. Why shouldn't you accept your allergy and miss out on other leafy foods as well, so as not to confuse anyone around you?

 

No one is allergic to "cake", and I have no idea what a "cake-free" recipe is. People are allergic to things that are commonly found in (among other things) cakes. They're allergic to gluten, or lactose, or eggs, or yeast, or wider classes of grains than just gluten grains, or chocolate...or maybe more unusual things like particular additives or preservatives. Some people have specific dietary rules because of their religion (like kosher and halal). They can have restrictions because of non-religious philosophical beliefs (vegetarian, vegan, farm to table). Maybe they're just following the fad diet of the year/decade/century.

 

If you're not catering for them, it doesn't mater what they do or don't eat. If you are catering for them...it's up to you to decide if you want them as a customer.

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